El Dorado (1967)

126 mins | Western | 1967

Director:

Howard Hawks

Writer:

Leigh Brackett

Producer:

Howard Hawks

Cinematographer:

Harold Rosson

Editor:

John Woodcock

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Carl Anderson

Production Company:

Laurel Productions
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HISTORY

Location scenes filmed in Arizona. ...

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Location scenes filmed in Arizona.

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CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Andrew J. Durkus
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score & cond
Accomp
Orch
VISUAL EFFECTS
Paul K. Lerpae
Spec photog eff
process photog
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Prop
Original title paintings
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Stars in Their Courses by Harry Peter M'Nab Brown (New York, 1960).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"El Dorado," words and mysic by Nelson |a Riddle and John Gabriel.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
Denver opening: 7 Jun 1967
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Laurel Productions
31 December 1966
LP34528
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
126
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Gunfighter Cole Thornton rides into the frontier town of El Dorado and is reunited with J. P. Harrah, an old friend who is now the local sheriff. Thornton has been sent for by cattle baron Bart Jason, but he refuses to work for the man when J. P. informs him that his job will be to drive the MacDonald family off their land, which Jason needs for water. When Cole is ambushed while riding back from the Jason ranch, he wounds one of Kevin MacDonald's four sons, who shoots himself to escape the pain. Before Cole can explain the incident to MacDonald's hoydenish daughter, Joey, the young woman shoots him. The bullet lodges itself close to Cole's spine, and old "Doc" Miller feels unqualified to remove it and suggests he see a more equipped surgeon. Sometime later, at a cantina near the Mexican border, Cole strikes up a friendship with a young drifter named Mississippi. He also meets Jason's new hired gunman, Nelse McLeod, and learns that J. P. has been drunk ever since being jilted by a dancehall girl. Accompanied by Mississippi, Cole rides back to El Dorado and attempts to sober up J. P. with a liquid concoction laced with gunpowder. An effort to restore peace by jailing Jason and driving McLeod out of town is temporarily successful, but they return, capture Cole, and then trade him for Jason. As the inevitable showdown nears, Cole's right hand becomes partially paralyzed because of the bullet near his spine; and J. P. is forced to hobble around on crutches because of a leg wound. Aided by J. P.'s wizened arrow-shooting deputy, Bull Harris, and the fiery Joey, they manage ...

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Gunfighter Cole Thornton rides into the frontier town of El Dorado and is reunited with J. P. Harrah, an old friend who is now the local sheriff. Thornton has been sent for by cattle baron Bart Jason, but he refuses to work for the man when J. P. informs him that his job will be to drive the MacDonald family off their land, which Jason needs for water. When Cole is ambushed while riding back from the Jason ranch, he wounds one of Kevin MacDonald's four sons, who shoots himself to escape the pain. Before Cole can explain the incident to MacDonald's hoydenish daughter, Joey, the young woman shoots him. The bullet lodges itself close to Cole's spine, and old "Doc" Miller feels unqualified to remove it and suggests he see a more equipped surgeon. Sometime later, at a cantina near the Mexican border, Cole strikes up a friendship with a young drifter named Mississippi. He also meets Jason's new hired gunman, Nelse McLeod, and learns that J. P. has been drunk ever since being jilted by a dancehall girl. Accompanied by Mississippi, Cole rides back to El Dorado and attempts to sober up J. P. with a liquid concoction laced with gunpowder. An effort to restore peace by jailing Jason and driving McLeod out of town is temporarily successful, but they return, capture Cole, and then trade him for Jason. As the inevitable showdown nears, Cole's right hand becomes partially paralyzed because of the bullet near his spine; and J. P. is forced to hobble around on crutches because of a leg wound. Aided by J. P.'s wizened arrow-shooting deputy, Bull Harris, and the fiery Joey, they manage to kill Jason, McLeod, and the entire gang. With peace restored, Mississippi decides to settle down with Joey; Cole resumes his longtime courtship of Maudie, El Dorado's saloon proprietress; and the now-sober J. P. basks in his renewed self respect.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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