Hud (1963)

112 mins | Western, Drama | 29 May 1963

Full page view
HISTORY

Principal photography began in Claude, TX, just outside Amarillo, TX, on 21 May 1962, a week after the production arrived there for several days of rehearsal, according to the 8 May 1962 and 14 May 1962 issues of DV, and the 30 May 1962 Var. Adapted from Larry McMurtry’s 1961 novel, Horseman, Pass By, the script began under the name Hud, according to the 23 Mar 1962 LAT, but Paramount Pictures changed the title to Wildest of the Thousand before filming began, then changed it again to Hud Bannon during production. Hud Bannon became the preferred title for nearly two months, until it was changed again to The Winner, the 24 Jul 1962 DV noted. By that time, both producer–director Martin Ritt and actor Paul Newman were protesting against yet another studio-suggested title, Hud Bannon Against the World, the 13 Jul 1962 DV reported.
       The 5 Jun 1962 DV announced that the production had moved to the J. B. Henderson ranch near Goodnight, TX, for a week of filming. The 27 Jun 1962 DV reported that the company had returned to the Paramount Studio lot in Hollywood, CA, to begin four weeks of interior shooting the following day.
Tn an on-set interview at Paramount, Martin Ritt told the 5 Aug 1962 NYT that the budget was $2,350,000. He said the film, which at the time was titled The Winner, was a “modern Western” designed to undermine the “hard-fighting, heaving-drinking, loose-living hero” Hollywood had been championing ... More Less

Principal photography began in Claude, TX, just outside Amarillo, TX, on 21 May 1962, a week after the production arrived there for several days of rehearsal, according to the 8 May 1962 and 14 May 1962 issues of DV, and the 30 May 1962 Var. Adapted from Larry McMurtry’s 1961 novel, Horseman, Pass By, the script began under the name Hud, according to the 23 Mar 1962 LAT, but Paramount Pictures changed the title to Wildest of the Thousand before filming began, then changed it again to Hud Bannon during production. Hud Bannon became the preferred title for nearly two months, until it was changed again to The Winner, the 24 Jul 1962 DV noted. By that time, both producer–director Martin Ritt and actor Paul Newman were protesting against yet another studio-suggested title, Hud Bannon Against the World, the 13 Jul 1962 DV reported.
       The 5 Jun 1962 DV announced that the production had moved to the J. B. Henderson ranch near Goodnight, TX, for a week of filming. The 27 Jun 1962 DV reported that the company had returned to the Paramount Studio lot in Hollywood, CA, to begin four weeks of interior shooting the following day.
Tn an on-set interview at Paramount, Martin Ritt told the 5 Aug 1962 NYT that the budget was $2,350,000. He said the film, which at the time was titled The Winner, was a “modern Western” designed to undermine the “hard-fighting, heaving-drinking, loose-living hero” Hollywood had been championing for the previous fifty years. Ritt claimed Paramount executives wanted to change the ending and show Paul Newman’s character “reforming and marrying the nice girl,” until Ritt threatened to take the project to another studio. Husband-and-wife writers Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank, Jr., who had found McMurty’s novel in a Hollywood bookstore and adapted it to the screen, were also co-producers, and therefore present on the set throughout production, ready to make rewrites if necessary.
       The 21 Jun 1962 LAT reported that Hollywood music producer Jimmie Haskell would provide the “pre-scoring” for the film, but Haskell was ultimately not credited.
       During production at Paramount, Geoffrey Shurlock, head of the Production Code Administration, objected to some of the movie’s “rough language,” including the word “bastard,” according to the 13 Jul 1962 DV. However, after the film’s completion, Ritt told the 10 Dec 1962 DV that Shurlock had seen the final print and “approved it with all the lines at first questioned.” Shurlock himself stated in the 22 May 1963 Var that Hud was a “deeply moral” film, and the Catholic Legion of Decency agreed, calling it “morally unobjectionable for adults.”
       Hud opened in Los Angeles on 23 May 1963 and New York City on 28 May 1963, during a long Memorial Day holiday weekend, and received favorable-to-glowing reviews. Paramount announced at a stockholders meeting the previous day that the grosses for Hud were on track to make it the studio’s “biggest boxoffice hit of the year,” according to the 4 Jun 1963 DV.
       The film received four Academy Award nominations: Actor (Paul Newman); Directing (Martin Ritt); Art Direction; and Writing (Screenplay—based on material from another medium) (Ravetch and Frank, Jr.). It won three Academy Awards: Actress (Patricia Neal); Actor in a Supporting Role (Melvyn Douglas); and Cinematography (James Wong Howe).
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Mar 1962
p. 10.
Daily Variety
3 May 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
8 May 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
14 May 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
17 May 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
5 Jun 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1962
p. 8,.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
13 Jul 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
4 Jun 1963
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
23 Mar 1962
Section C, p. 17.
Los Angeles Times
21 Jun 1962
Section C, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
27 May 1963
Section D, p. 11.
New York Times
5 Aug 1962
p. 89.
New York Times
29 May 1963
p. 26.
Variety
30 May 1962
p. 4.
Variety
22 May 1963
p. 4.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Paramount Release
A Salem -Dover Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2nd unit photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus scored by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Dial coach
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Horseman, Pass By by Larry McMurtry (New York, 1961).
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Hud Bannon
Wildest of the Thousand
Hud Bannon Against the World
The Winners
Release Date:
29 May 1963
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 May 1963
New York opening: 28 May 1963
Production Date:
21 May -- late Julyy/early August 1962
Copyright Claimant:
Salem Productions
Copyright Date:
31 December 1962
Copyright Number:
LP25023
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
112
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Hud Bannon, the selfish, self-centered son of veteran Texas cattleman Homer Bannon, is despised by his father, a man of staunch integrity whose philosophy of life is diametrically opposed to Hud's. Homer's bitterness in part rests on his son's responsibility for an auto accident fifteen years earlier that resulted in the death of Hud's older brother; the brother's orphaned son, Lon, now seventeen years old, is divided between adolescent adulation of Hud and loving respect for his grandfather. Also living on the ranch is Alma, an earthy housekeeper physically attracted to Hud, but unwilling to yield to his boorish advances. One of Homer Bannon's cows is found dead, apparently from hoof-and mouth disease, and Hud suggests they sell the entire herd before a government inspector can order the cattle slaughtered; but Homer refuses and agrees to have his cows killed to protect other farmers. Hud regards the decision as proof of the old man's senility and takes steps to have his father declared mentally incompetent. Hud goes on a drinking spree and attempts to rape Alma, but Lon interrupts him, and Alma leaves the ranch the following day. Homer is then stricken by a fatal heart attack while riding on horseback around his deserted land. After the funeral, Lon, now fully aware of his uncle's despicable nature, decides to leave and make his own way in the world. Totally alone, Hud watches the boy depart, shrugs his shoulders, and opens a can of ... +


Hud Bannon, the selfish, self-centered son of veteran Texas cattleman Homer Bannon, is despised by his father, a man of staunch integrity whose philosophy of life is diametrically opposed to Hud's. Homer's bitterness in part rests on his son's responsibility for an auto accident fifteen years earlier that resulted in the death of Hud's older brother; the brother's orphaned son, Lon, now seventeen years old, is divided between adolescent adulation of Hud and loving respect for his grandfather. Also living on the ranch is Alma, an earthy housekeeper physically attracted to Hud, but unwilling to yield to his boorish advances. One of Homer Bannon's cows is found dead, apparently from hoof-and mouth disease, and Hud suggests they sell the entire herd before a government inspector can order the cattle slaughtered; but Homer refuses and agrees to have his cows killed to protect other farmers. Hud regards the decision as proof of the old man's senility and takes steps to have his father declared mentally incompetent. Hud goes on a drinking spree and attempts to rape Alma, but Lon interrupts him, and Alma leaves the ranch the following day. Homer is then stricken by a fatal heart attack while riding on horseback around his deserted land. After the funeral, Lon, now fully aware of his uncle's despicable nature, decides to leave and make his own way in the world. Totally alone, Hud watches the boy depart, shrugs his shoulders, and opens a can of beer. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.