Any Wednesday (1966)

109 mins | Comedy | 13 October 1966

Producer:

Julius J. Epstein

Cinematographer:

Harold Lipstein

Editor:

Stefan Arnsten

Production Designer:

Alfred Sweeney

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

The 12 Apr 1965 LAT reported that Warner Bros. Pictures had acquired film rights to Muriel Resnick’s 1964 stage comedy, Any Wednesday. The 25 Jan 1966 NYT estimated the purchase at $750,000.
       The studio hoped to star Elizabeth Ashley, Frank Sinatra, and Sandy Dennis in a reprisal of her Broadway role. On 8 Jul 1965, LAT reported that Sinatra had accepted the part of “a businessman who maintains a luxury apartment for his girl friend.” A news item in the 27 Sep 1965 DV announced Joe Anthony as director. The 9 Oct 1965 LAT included Robert Wagner among the cast. However, the 13 Dec 1965 DV noted that Robert Redford was also under consideration. Two days later, the 15 Dec 1965 issue announced Jane Fonda for a lead role. Sinatra had since withdrawn from the project, explaining that he did not want to alter the play by expanding his part to justify his high salary. A 13 Jan 1966 DV news brief noted that Connie Stevens had been campaigning for Fonda’s role. Actress Deborah Kerr was asked to read for a lead part, according to the 7 Jan 1966 LAT.
       Other castings included Tom Cound (20 Apr 1966 DV) ; Betty Breslek, George Neise, and Kay Elhardt (28 Apr 1966 DV) ; Terri Baker (11 May 1966 DV) ; and Karla Most (25 May 1966 DV).
       As the start of production approached, the 8 Feb 1966 LAT announced that ... More Less

The 12 Apr 1965 LAT reported that Warner Bros. Pictures had acquired film rights to Muriel Resnick’s 1964 stage comedy, Any Wednesday. The 25 Jan 1966 NYT estimated the purchase at $750,000.
       The studio hoped to star Elizabeth Ashley, Frank Sinatra, and Sandy Dennis in a reprisal of her Broadway role. On 8 Jul 1965, LAT reported that Sinatra had accepted the part of “a businessman who maintains a luxury apartment for his girl friend.” A news item in the 27 Sep 1965 DV announced Joe Anthony as director. The 9 Oct 1965 LAT included Robert Wagner among the cast. However, the 13 Dec 1965 DV noted that Robert Redford was also under consideration. Two days later, the 15 Dec 1965 issue announced Jane Fonda for a lead role. Sinatra had since withdrawn from the project, explaining that he did not want to alter the play by expanding his part to justify his high salary. A 13 Jan 1966 DV news brief noted that Connie Stevens had been campaigning for Fonda’s role. Actress Deborah Kerr was asked to read for a lead part, according to the 7 Jan 1966 LAT.
       Other castings included Tom Cound (20 Apr 1966 DV) ; Betty Breslek, George Neise, and Kay Elhardt (28 Apr 1966 DV) ; Terri Baker (11 May 1966 DV) ; and Karla Most (25 May 1966 DV).
       As the start of production approached, the 8 Feb 1966 LAT announced that director Joe Anthony had been replaced by Robert Ellis Miller. The 10 Feb 1966 DV noted that Jim Hutton auditioned for the part of “Cass Henderson” before it was assumed by Dean Jones. Eight days later, DV stated that Glynis Johns was being considered to play “Dorothy Cleves,” the role that ultimately went to Rosemary Murphy. Principal photography began 28 Mar 1966 in New York City. The 11 May 1966 NYT identified one location as “165 East 64th Street.” Dean Jones told the 7 Jun 1966 LAT that two weeks of rain forced the company to move production to Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, CA, where “process shots” of New York City would be used as background. According to the 3 May 1966 DV, Jones was given a brief hiatus to recover from a case of strep throat.
       The 20 Apr 1966 DV revealed that director Robert Ellis Miller would include actual footage of the power outage that darkened New York City on 9 Nov 1965. The footage would be tinted to give the illusion of color. Miller also planned to use a “split-screen” technique for scenes depicting telephone conversations. The 6 May 1966 issue announced that the company was returning to New York City over the coming weekend to shoot footage for the next five days. Meanwhile, screenwriter-producer Julius J. Epstein told the 12 May 1966 DV that he avoided censorship of his script by not portraying marital infidelity in a flippant manner. The next day, DV reported that the company encountered resistance from residents of East 64th Street when asked to allow their townhouses to be used for exteriors scenes. Permission was finally granted by the wife of filmmaker Otto Preminger, whose husband encountered a similar problem in Baton Rouge, LA. Upon returning from the East Coast, the crew began filming in San Marino, CA, on 16 May 1966, as stated in that day’s DV. Production ended seven days later, according to the 23 May 1966 edition.
       The 9 Aug 1966 DV reported that composer George Duning hired the Johnny Mann Singers to perform on the soundtrack.
       Any Wednesday opened 13 Oct 1966 in New York City at Radio City Music Hall, and 23 Dec 1966 in Los Angeles, CA, at the Pantages Theatre. Reviews were mixed. The 14 Oct 1966 NYT complained that several of Ellis’s enhancements, including the “power blackout” sequence, did little to improve the story, suggesting that the film could have been shortened instead. Regardless, the 14 Oct 1966 DV reported opening-day receipts from Radio City approaching $23,000.
       The 2 Dec 1966 DV noted that, starting 15 Dec 1966, Dean Jones would appear on billboards and in “window displays,” cross-promoting the picture and Sinclair Paints.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
13 Dec 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1965
p. 1.
Daily Variety
13 Jan 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
10 Feb 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1966
p. 6.
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1966
p. 14.
Daily Variety
25 Mar 1966
p. 16.
Daily Variety
29 Mar 1966
p. 22.
Daily Variety
20 Apr 1966
p. 4, 5.
Daily Variety
28 Apr 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
3 May 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
6 May 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
11 May 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
12 May 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
13 May 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
16 May 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
23 May 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
25 May 1966
p. 7.
Daily Variety
9 Aug 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
13 Oct 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
14 Oct 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1966
p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
13 Jan 1965
p. 18A.
Los Angeles Times
12 Apr 1965
Section D, p. 21.
Los Angeles Times
14 May 1965
Section C, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
8 Jul 1965
Section C, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
8 Aug 1965
Section L, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
28 Sep 1965
Section C, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
9 Oct 1965
Section A, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
7 Jan 1966
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
8 Feb 1966
Section C, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
22 May 1966
Section C, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
27 May 1966
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
7 Jun 1966
Section C, p. 1, 11.
Los Angeles Times
18 Dec 1966
Section B, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
24 Dec 1966
p. 12.
New York Times
22 Feb 1965
p. 13.
New York Times
2 May 1965
Section X, p. 9.
New York Times
16 Jan 1966
Section X, p. 15.
New York Times
25 Jan 1966
p. 46.
New York Times
11 May 1966
p. 38.
New York Times
14 Oct 1966
p. 50.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Cost des
Wigs
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Supv hairstylist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Any Wednesday by Muriel Resnik (New York, 18 Feb 1964).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Any Wednesday," music by George Duning, lyrics by Marilyn and Alan Bergman.
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 October 1966
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 13 October 1966
Los Angeles opening: 23 December 1966
Production Date:
28 March--23 May 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures
Copyright Date:
31 December 1966
Copyright Number:
LP36583
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
109
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Six days a week, middle-aged industrial millionaire John Cleves leaves his New York City office and returns home to his wife, Dorothy, in New Jersey. On Wednesdays, when he is supposedly away on business trips, he goes to the East Side apartment of his young mistress, Ellen Gordon. Because the apartment is listed in John's expense books as an "executive suite," his new and inexperienced secretary gives the address to Cass Henderson, an out-of-town businessman who can't find a hotel room. Upon discovering Ellen in the apartment, Cass concludes she is a party girl supplied by Cleves. The situation becomes even stickier when the secretary next gives the address to Mrs. Cleves, who arrives at the apartment and assumes that Ellen and Cass are married. Delighted to meet a young couple from Ohio, Dorothy insists that the Hendersons join the Cleves for a night on the town. The evening is a disaster for all concerned, culminating in the breakup of the Cleves' marriage. Although John moves into Ellen's apartment, Ellen becomes friends with Dorothy and offers her the use of the "executive suite" whenever she is in town. As a result, John arrives there one day and discovers his as yet undivorced wife taking a bath. Ellen also bursts in, catches them making love, and, furious, races into the arms of the delighted Cass. John then begs Dorothy to take him back. After consideration, she decides he is very poor husband material; but she assures him that he can call her "any ... +


Six days a week, middle-aged industrial millionaire John Cleves leaves his New York City office and returns home to his wife, Dorothy, in New Jersey. On Wednesdays, when he is supposedly away on business trips, he goes to the East Side apartment of his young mistress, Ellen Gordon. Because the apartment is listed in John's expense books as an "executive suite," his new and inexperienced secretary gives the address to Cass Henderson, an out-of-town businessman who can't find a hotel room. Upon discovering Ellen in the apartment, Cass concludes she is a party girl supplied by Cleves. The situation becomes even stickier when the secretary next gives the address to Mrs. Cleves, who arrives at the apartment and assumes that Ellen and Cass are married. Delighted to meet a young couple from Ohio, Dorothy insists that the Hendersons join the Cleves for a night on the town. The evening is a disaster for all concerned, culminating in the breakup of the Cleves' marriage. Although John moves into Ellen's apartment, Ellen becomes friends with Dorothy and offers her the use of the "executive suite" whenever she is in town. As a result, John arrives there one day and discovers his as yet undivorced wife taking a bath. Ellen also bursts in, catches them making love, and, furious, races into the arms of the delighted Cass. John then begs Dorothy to take him back. After consideration, she decides he is very poor husband material; but she assures him that he can call her "any Wednesday." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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