Is Paris Burning? (1966)

173 mins | Drama | 1966

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HISTORY

Copyright length: 136 min. Opened in Paris in Oct 1966 in 70mm under the title Paris brûle-t-il? Initial running time: 173 min. Subsequent cuts resulted in the omission of all of E. G. Marshall's scenes. Most sources credit only Gore Vidal and Francis Ford Coppola with screenplay. ...

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Copyright length: 136 min. Opened in Paris in Oct 1966 in 70mm under the title Paris brûle-t-il? Initial running time: 173 min. Subsequent cuts resulted in the omission of all of E. G. Marshall's scenes. Most sources credit only Gore Vidal and Francis Ford Coppola with screenplay.

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CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Michel Lonsdale
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
WRITERS
Scr (see note)
Addl dial for french scenes
Addl dial for german scenes
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2nd unit cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
2nd unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book Is Paris Burning? by Larry Collins, Dominique Lapierre (New York, 1965).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Paris brûle-t-il?
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 Nov 1966
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Transcontinental Films
10 November 1966
LP33770
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black & white with color sequences
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
173
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In August, 1944, as Allied troops await orders to march into German-occupied Paris, Hitler assigns command of the city to Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz. The Feuhrer's orders are simple and direct--if Paris cannot be held, it is to be burned to the ground. At the same time, the French Resistance movement, which has succeeded in taking possession of two-thirds of the city, is divided over a new plan of strategy. Gen. Jacques Chaban-Delmas, a Free French follower of Charles de Gaulle, strongly opposes those Communists favoring an immediate insurrection, which he fears might turn Paris into another Warsaw. With the help of the Swedish consul, Nordling, he attempts to arrange for the release of an important political prisoner, Bernard Labe, who might succeed in forestalling the uprising; but the plan ultimately fails, and Labe is shot. Word arrives that the Allies have decided to bypass the city and push directly to the Rhine, whereupon the Free French send Major Gallois to convince the Allied High Command that at least one military unit must liberate Paris, thereby enabling Germany to save face and surrender with honor. Von Choltitz, through all of this, procrastinates and ignores Hitler's hysterical demands that the city be burned. Largely responsible for the general's hesitancy is Nordling, who appeals to both von Choltitz' reason and his vanity by pointing out that by refusing to destroy centuries of history merely to satisfy a madman, he would become known as the man who saved Paris. Consequently, the order to burn the city is never given and, on August 25th, American and French soldiers liberate Paris. As von Choltitz is taken prisoner, exultant Parisians surge through the streets to ...

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In August, 1944, as Allied troops await orders to march into German-occupied Paris, Hitler assigns command of the city to Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz. The Feuhrer's orders are simple and direct--if Paris cannot be held, it is to be burned to the ground. At the same time, the French Resistance movement, which has succeeded in taking possession of two-thirds of the city, is divided over a new plan of strategy. Gen. Jacques Chaban-Delmas, a Free French follower of Charles de Gaulle, strongly opposes those Communists favoring an immediate insurrection, which he fears might turn Paris into another Warsaw. With the help of the Swedish consul, Nordling, he attempts to arrange for the release of an important political prisoner, Bernard Labe, who might succeed in forestalling the uprising; but the plan ultimately fails, and Labe is shot. Word arrives that the Allies have decided to bypass the city and push directly to the Rhine, whereupon the Free French send Major Gallois to convince the Allied High Command that at least one military unit must liberate Paris, thereby enabling Germany to save face and surrender with honor. Von Choltitz, through all of this, procrastinates and ignores Hitler's hysterical demands that the city be burned. Largely responsible for the general's hesitancy is Nordling, who appeals to both von Choltitz' reason and his vanity by pointing out that by refusing to destroy centuries of history merely to satisfy a madman, he would become known as the man who saved Paris. Consequently, the order to burn the city is never given and, on August 25th, American and French soldiers liberate Paris. As von Choltitz is taken prisoner, exultant Parisians surge through the streets to greet the return of General Charles de Gaulle.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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