Goodbye, Columbus (1969)

105 mins | Comedy-drama | 3 April 1969

Director:

Larry Peerce

Writer:

Arnold Schulman

Producer:

Stanley R. Jaffe

Cinematographer:

Gerald Hirschfeld

Editor:

Ralph Rosenblum

Production Designer:

Manny Gerard

Production Company:

Willow Tree Productions
Full page view
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Jan 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Jun 1968
p. 8.
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1968
p. 7.
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1968
p. 8.
Daily Variety
20 Aug 1968
p. 12.
Daily Variety
23 Aug 1968
p. 17.
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
5 Dec 1968
p. 23.
Daily Variety
18 Mar 1969
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
6 Oct 1968
Section S, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
29 Mar 1969
p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
6 Apr 1969
Section P, p. 1.
New York Times
15 Aug 1968
p. 39.
New York Times
8 Sep 1968
Section D, p. 18.
New York Times
17 Dec 1968
p. 53.
New York Times
4 Apr 1969
p. 43.
New York Times
13 Apr 1969
Section D, p. 1.
Variety
22 May 1968
p. 20.
Variety
29 Jan 1969
p. 7.
Variety
19 Mar 1969
p. 23.
Variety
6 Aug 1969
p. 26.
Variety
10 Dec 1969
p. 3.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Stanley R. Jaffe Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward des
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup
SOURCES
LITERARY
Inspired by the short story "Goodbye, Columbus" by Philip Roth in his Goodbye, Columbus, and Five Short Stories (Boston, 1959).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Goodbye Columbus," words and music by The Association (Jim Yester), sung by The Association
"So Kind To Me (Brenda's Theme)," words and music by The Association, sung by The Association
"It's Gotta Be Real," words and music by The Association, sung by The Association
+
SONGS
"Goodbye Columbus," words and music by The Association (Jim Yester), sung by The Association
"So Kind To Me (Brenda's Theme)," words and music by The Association, sung by The Association
"It's Gotta Be Real," words and music by The Association, sung by The Association
"How Will I Know You?," music by Charles Fox. "Patricia," music by Pérez Prado
"I Remember You," music by Victor Schertzinger, lyrics by Johnny Mercer
"Hava Nagila," traditional
"Moon River," music by Henry Mancini, lyrics by Johnny Mercer.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 April 1969
Premiere Information:
New York and Los Angeles openings: 3 April 1969
Production Date:
8 July--mid August 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Willow Tree Productions
Copyright Date:
19 March 1969
Copyright Number:
LP36734
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
105
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Recently discharged from the Army, and with no immediate plans for his future, college dropout Neil Klugman has moved into his Aunt Gladys' Bronx apartment and taken a job in the local library. Having been invited by his cousin Doris to spend a day at the country club to which she belongs, Neil is attracted to a vacationing Radcliffe student, Brenda Patimkin, the daughter of a nouveau riche Jewish businessman. Despite his disdain for Brenda's affluent Westchester County way of life, Neil determinedly starts dating her. Mrs. Patimkin becomes concerned about Neil's lack of ambition and concludes that he is unworthy of her daughter, but Mr. Patimkin assures his wife that Brenda will soon tire of the romance. Instead, as her summer vacation nears its end, Brenda invites Neil to spend his 2-week vacation at her home, and each night when the rest of the family is asleep Neil and Brenda make love in her room. Neil discovers that Brenda is not taking birth control pills because they make her sick, and he insists that she get fitted for a diaphragm. On the night before Brenda's return to school, her brother Ron marries his girl friend, whom he met while he was an Ohio State basketball star in Columbus. At the lavish wedding reception, a somewhat inebriated Mr. Patimkin tells Brenda how much he loves her and how much faith he has in her strong moral convictions. Once back at Radcliffe, Brenda writes to Neil and asks him to join her in Boston for a long weekend. In the sleazy hotel room where they check in as husband and wife, Brenda tells Neil that her mother found the diaphragm ... +


Recently discharged from the Army, and with no immediate plans for his future, college dropout Neil Klugman has moved into his Aunt Gladys' Bronx apartment and taken a job in the local library. Having been invited by his cousin Doris to spend a day at the country club to which she belongs, Neil is attracted to a vacationing Radcliffe student, Brenda Patimkin, the daughter of a nouveau riche Jewish businessman. Despite his disdain for Brenda's affluent Westchester County way of life, Neil determinedly starts dating her. Mrs. Patimkin becomes concerned about Neil's lack of ambition and concludes that he is unworthy of her daughter, but Mr. Patimkin assures his wife that Brenda will soon tire of the romance. Instead, as her summer vacation nears its end, Brenda invites Neil to spend his 2-week vacation at her home, and each night when the rest of the family is asleep Neil and Brenda make love in her room. Neil discovers that Brenda is not taking birth control pills because they make her sick, and he insists that she get fitted for a diaphragm. On the night before Brenda's return to school, her brother Ron marries his girl friend, whom he met while he was an Ohio State basketball star in Columbus. At the lavish wedding reception, a somewhat inebriated Mr. Patimkin tells Brenda how much he loves her and how much faith he has in her strong moral convictions. Once back at Radcliffe, Brenda writes to Neil and asks him to join her in Boston for a long weekend. In the sleazy hotel room where they check in as husband and wife, Brenda tells Neil that her mother found the diaphragm in her room, shows him reproachful letters from her parents, and tells him that she can't invite him to her home again. Concluding that Brenda's guilt feelings about their affair subconsciously led her to leave the diaphragm where her mother would inevitably find it, Neil accuses Brenda of posing as someone intellectually and morally free while, in reality, she is essentially the model Jewish daughter her parents want. Disillusioned, and with nothing left to say, Neil picks up his suitcase and walks out into the street. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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