The Guns of August (1964)

99 mins | Documentary | 1964

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HISTORY

Producer Nathan Kroll used footage from government archives in Paris, London, Brussels, Berlin, and Washington, D. ... More Less

Producer Nathan Kroll used footage from government archives in Paris, London, Brussels, Berlin, and Washington, D. C. More Less

CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Created and prod by
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
PRODUCTION MISC
Stills & maps
European research
Titles
ANIMATION
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book The Guns of August by Barbara W. Tuchman (New York, 1962).
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 24 December 1964
Duration(in mins):
99
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

The film is a narrative of the events leading up to World War I, a study of the European royalty and statesmen involved in these events, and a chronicle of the crucial action of the war itself. The film opens with the funeral procession of England's King Edward VII on 20 May 1910 and includes portraits of many of the statesmen in attendance: Czar Nicholas of Russia, Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, Emperor Franz Josef of Austria, King Albert of Belgium, and the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir apparent to the throne of Austria-Hungary. The film then deals with the gathering storm of political and royal intrigue from 1910 to the assassination of Ferdinand in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914; among those shown are Clemenceau, Poincaré, Marshal Joffre, Woodrow Wilson, Major General Ludendorff, Winston Churchill, and Rasputin. The war begins and there is fighting on two fronts. In the east, the crucial Battle of Tannenberg reveals the devastation visited upon the Russian Army by the Germans. Lenin and Trotsky appear. On the western front, the German Army marches through neutral Belgium against valiant but futile resistance, and then takes 10 French cities in 1 1/2 weeks, leaving much of France desolated. The French finally stop the German advance in the Battle of the Marne. Other action includes the Battle of Verdun, the Battle of the Somme, and the final offensive of 1918 under Ludendorff for control of Northern Europe and Scandinavia. The film also details the German Navy's submarine warfare, the American entry into the war, and the Armistice in ... +


The film is a narrative of the events leading up to World War I, a study of the European royalty and statesmen involved in these events, and a chronicle of the crucial action of the war itself. The film opens with the funeral procession of England's King Edward VII on 20 May 1910 and includes portraits of many of the statesmen in attendance: Czar Nicholas of Russia, Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, Emperor Franz Josef of Austria, King Albert of Belgium, and the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir apparent to the throne of Austria-Hungary. The film then deals with the gathering storm of political and royal intrigue from 1910 to the assassination of Ferdinand in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914; among those shown are Clemenceau, Poincaré, Marshal Joffre, Woodrow Wilson, Major General Ludendorff, Winston Churchill, and Rasputin. The war begins and there is fighting on two fronts. In the east, the crucial Battle of Tannenberg reveals the devastation visited upon the Russian Army by the Germans. Lenin and Trotsky appear. On the western front, the German Army marches through neutral Belgium against valiant but futile resistance, and then takes 10 French cities in 1 1/2 weeks, leaving much of France desolated. The French finally stop the German advance in the Battle of the Marne. Other action includes the Battle of Verdun, the Battle of the Somme, and the final offensive of 1918 under Ludendorff for control of Northern Europe and Scandinavia. The film also details the German Navy's submarine warfare, the American entry into the war, and the Armistice in 1918. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.