Hawaii (1966)

189 mins | Drama | 1966

Director:

George Roy Hill

Producer:

Walter Mirisch

Cinematographer:

Russell Harlan

Editor:

Stuart Gilmore

Production Designer:

Cary Odell

Production Company:

Mirisch Corp.
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HISTORY

Location scenes filmed in Norway, New England, Tahiti, and Hawaii. Fred Zinnemann, after more than 4 years of preparation, withdrew as director before shooting began; George Roy Hill took over and, after being temporarily replaced by Arthur Hiller, finished the picture. The Hawaiians, which was based on another portion of Michener's novel, was released by United Artists in 1970. ...

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Location scenes filmed in Norway, New England, Tahiti, and Hawaii. Fred Zinnemann, after more than 4 years of preparation, withdrew as director before shooting began; George Roy Hill took over and, after being temporarily replaced by Arthur Hiller, finished the picture. The Hawaiians, which was based on another portion of Michener's novel, was released by United Artists in 1970.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A George Roy Hill-Walter Mirisch Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prolog seq supv
Prolog seq supv
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2nd unit cam
Prolog seq cam
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Vis eff ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des & exec
MUSIC
Orch
Orch
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Linwood Dunn
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Tech res
Prop
Casting
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Hawaii by James Albert Michener (New York, 1959).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"My Wishing Doll," words and music by Elmer Bernstein and Mack David.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
1966
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 10 Oct 1966
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Mirisch Corp.
24 October 1966
LP34404
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
189
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In 1820, following his graduation from the Yale Divinity School, tall, gangling, bumbling Abner Hale volunteers to carry the word of God to the heathen natives of Hawaii. In need of a wife before he can offer himself to the service, he timorously proposes to Jerusha Bromley, a young woman in love with an adventurous sea captain, Rafer Hoxworth, from whom she has not received a letter in over three years. To Abner's astonishment, Jerusha agrees to marry him, and they soon set sail for Hawaii. After a stormy and arduous voyage, during which their tiny two-masted vessel is battered by mountainous waves off Cape Horn, Abner and Jerusha finally reach the islands, where they receive a royal welcome from the Queen, the Alii Nui, Malama. Although Jerusha easily makes friends with the natives and tries to understand their customs, the sanctimonious Abner refuses to make any concessions and rigidly imposes his will upon the pleasure-and-peace-loving Hawaiians. He orders them to destroy their pagan idols, cover their naked bodies, and abolish their ancient practice of incestuous marriage. The Alii Nui instructs her people to obey, although she herself refuses to deny the deep love she feels for her brother, Kelolo. One day a sailing ship arrives in the harbor and Jerusha suddenly finds herself face to face with Hoxworth. Although still attracted to him, she nevertheless rejects his offer of love and chooses instead to remain with Abner. Later, sailors from several ships, including Hoxworth's, set fire to Abner's church as a protest against his forbidding the native girls to mingle with seamen. Led by Abner and Jerusha, the islanders put out the fire and drive off the sailors, ...

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In 1820, following his graduation from the Yale Divinity School, tall, gangling, bumbling Abner Hale volunteers to carry the word of God to the heathen natives of Hawaii. In need of a wife before he can offer himself to the service, he timorously proposes to Jerusha Bromley, a young woman in love with an adventurous sea captain, Rafer Hoxworth, from whom she has not received a letter in over three years. To Abner's astonishment, Jerusha agrees to marry him, and they soon set sail for Hawaii. After a stormy and arduous voyage, during which their tiny two-masted vessel is battered by mountainous waves off Cape Horn, Abner and Jerusha finally reach the islands, where they receive a royal welcome from the Queen, the Alii Nui, Malama. Although Jerusha easily makes friends with the natives and tries to understand their customs, the sanctimonious Abner refuses to make any concessions and rigidly imposes his will upon the pleasure-and-peace-loving Hawaiians. He orders them to destroy their pagan idols, cover their naked bodies, and abolish their ancient practice of incestuous marriage. The Alii Nui instructs her people to obey, although she herself refuses to deny the deep love she feels for her brother, Kelolo. One day a sailing ship arrives in the harbor and Jerusha suddenly finds herself face to face with Hoxworth. Although still attracted to him, she nevertheless rejects his offer of love and chooses instead to remain with Abner. Later, sailors from several ships, including Hoxworth's, set fire to Abner's church as a protest against his forbidding the native girls to mingle with seamen. Led by Abner and Jerusha, the islanders put out the fire and drive off the sailors, and peace is momentarily restored. Gradually, however, more and more white men come to the islands, commercializing and corrupting the simple way of life and leaving behind disease and unhappiness. One day the Alii Nui sends for Abner and, realizing that her death is near, sends Kelolo into exile and receives a Christian baptism; but after she has been buried in sacred ground, Kelolo removes her body and disposes of it in the traditional pagan manner. A severe measles epidemic then sweeps the islands, taking the lives of hundreds of natives, including Keoki, a native clergyman who had studied with Abner at Yale. When Abner asks Keoki's sister-wife to pray with him, she brands him as a man of hate who worships a cruel and unforgiving God. As time passes, Jerusha gives birth to three sons and never ceases in her effort to persuade Abner that he must ask for forgiveness from God for the sorrow he has brought to the islands. In 1834, Hoxworth's ship once more returns to Hawaii and on board is a prefabricated New England house he plans to present to the Hales. When he learns Jerusha has since died, he strikes Abner in a fit of rage and then, filled with regret, goes to seek help for the man he has injured. Seven more years pass, and the now old and lame Abner is informed that he has been relieved of his ministry. He sends his three sons to England for their education, choosing himself to remain in Hawaii, still hopeful of somehow bringing God's word to the islands.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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