Roger Touhy, Gangster (1944)

65 mins | Drama | July 1944

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were The Terrible Terrys ; Prison Break ; The Life of Touhy ; Roger Touhy, Self-Made Man ; The Escape of Roger Touhy and Roger Touhy, Last of the Gangsters . Actor Moroni Olsen's first name is misspelled "Maroni" in the opening credits. The following written statements appear after the opening credits: "The portrayal of Federal Bureau of Investigation characters in this picture is not to be construed in any manner whatsoever as an endorsement or approval by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. We wish to acknowledge our appreciation to Governor Dwight H. Green of Illinois, P. T. Sullivan, Director of the Department of Safety, and Warden Joseph E. Ragen, who generously granted us permission to photograph all prison scenes at Stateville Prison, Joliet, Illinois. All characters appearing in this film are fictitious with the exception of the members of the Touhy gang and those other persons whose true names are used herein."
       At the film's end, Warden Ragen appears onscreen and gives the following speech: "They say crime doesn't pay. I disagree--crime does pay. It pays off in disgrace to yourself and family--and for those who continue to disregard law and order even while in prison, this is the only answer--solitary confinement. I wish that every man, woman and child in America could see for themselves just how a person who has lived outside the law--lives behind prison bars. I would much rather see you here as a visitor than as a permanent guest of the State of Illinois."
       The picture is loosely based on the life of Roger Touhy (1898--1959), ... More Less

The working titles of this film were The Terrible Terrys ; Prison Break ; The Life of Touhy ; Roger Touhy, Self-Made Man ; The Escape of Roger Touhy and Roger Touhy, Last of the Gangsters . Actor Moroni Olsen's first name is misspelled "Maroni" in the opening credits. The following written statements appear after the opening credits: "The portrayal of Federal Bureau of Investigation characters in this picture is not to be construed in any manner whatsoever as an endorsement or approval by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. We wish to acknowledge our appreciation to Governor Dwight H. Green of Illinois, P. T. Sullivan, Director of the Department of Safety, and Warden Joseph E. Ragen, who generously granted us permission to photograph all prison scenes at Stateville Prison, Joliet, Illinois. All characters appearing in this film are fictitious with the exception of the members of the Touhy gang and those other persons whose true names are used herein."
       At the film's end, Warden Ragen appears onscreen and gives the following speech: "They say crime doesn't pay. I disagree--crime does pay. It pays off in disgrace to yourself and family--and for those who continue to disregard law and order even while in prison, this is the only answer--solitary confinement. I wish that every man, woman and child in America could see for themselves just how a person who has lived outside the law--lives behind prison bars. I would much rather see you here as a visitor than as a permanent guest of the State of Illinois."
       The picture is loosely based on the life of Roger Touhy (1898--1959), a successful bootlegger who operated in the suburbs of Chicago. According to modern sources, contrary to the film's depiction of Touhy as a murderous, hardened criminal, the real Touhy was a businessman more interested in the quality of his illegally brewed beer than in ruling a gang. Some modern sources note that Touhy used guns borrowed from local police officers and off-duty officers to drive his beer trucks and intimidate emmissaries of Al Capone, who was interested in taking over Touhy's well-run operation. Despite his lack of a real "gang," Touhy succeeded in staying beyond Capone's reach, and in 1933, was acquitted in a case in which he was accused of kidnapping brewer William A. Hamm, Jr. Later that year, however, Touhy was again brought to trial and convicted of the kidnapping of John "Jake the Barber" Factor. According to modern sources, the kidnapping of Factor, himself a criminal, was engineered by Capone and Touhy was framed for the crime to get him out of Capone's way.
       When Touhy's attempts to obtain a retrial were unsuccessful, he accompanied gangster and former schoolteacher Basil "The Owl" Banghart and several others when they broke out of the Stateville Federal Penitentiary on 9 Oct 1942. Touhy was recaptured on 29 Dec 1942, and in the early 1950s, his conviction was overturned due to perjured testimony. He was finally released in 1959. Less than a month after his release, Touhy was gunned down and killed by an unknown assailant, presumably a member of Capone's old gang.
       According to a 13 Oct 1942 HR news item, executive producer Bryan Foy first decided to make a film about Touhy after reading a newspaper account about his escape from prison. A 17 Mar 1943 HR news item announced that Lloyd Nolan, who had originally been cast as "Roger Touhy," was permitted to withdraw from the role after taking "a stand against portraying any more screen gunmen." According to a 2 Apr 1943 studio press release, Kent Taylor was then signed to play "Touhy," with Preston Foster playing a "gallant G-man." In a Sep 1943 article, NYT reported that Taylor's and Foster's parts were subsequently reversed.
       According to a 24 May 1943 studio publicity statement, Anthony Quinn was originally assigned to play informer "Smoke Reardon." He was instead cast as "George Carroll" when "it was called to Producer [Lee] Marcus' attention that Quinn is one of the very few Latin-American actors of any prominence in Hollywood and it would not be conducive to inter-American amity to have him as such a despicable character." HR production charts and news items include Ralph Byrd and William Marshall in the cast, but their appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. Although Joseph MacDonald is credited by HR production charts as the film's photographer, Glen MacWilliams is listed as the director of photography in the onscreen credits. A modern source notes that director Robert Florey interviewed the real Touhy and his men at the penitentiary.
       After completion of principal photography, the film encountered many obstacles, including protests from the Federal Bureau of Investigation following a preview of the film held at Stateville in Jul 1942. Claiming that the studio had credited local law enforcement officials with actions taken by the FBI, the agency demanded that Twentieth Century-Fox reshoot part of the film. Retakes and additional scenes were shot in Sep 1943 and Mar 1944. According to information in NARS at Washington, D.C., The Office of Censorship disapproved the picture for export to other countries. Correspondence indicates that the film was first viewed by a member of the board on 17 Jun 1943 at a length of 6,582 feet. The studio then "did some editing and added a brief 'crime-does-not-pay' ending, and the final version, measuring 5,873 feet, was viewed on 24 Mar 1944 and disapproved shortly afterward. According to a 4 Dec 1947 NYT article, the MPAA declared the picture "unsuitable for re-release or re-issue," as part of its ban on gangster films.
       In 1943, Touhy himself attempted to keep the picture from being distributed. Claiming that the film was "injurious to his pride and family position," Touhy won a temporary restraining order against exhibition of the picture in early Aug 1943, but his permanent injunction against the film's release was denied. After the film's retakes and additional scenes were filmed, it was finally released in Jul 1944. On 15 Aug 1944, Touhy filed a million-dollar libel suit against Twentieth Century-Fox and exhibitors showing the picture in the Chicago area. On 1 Nov 1949, according to HCN , the studio settled with Touhy for $15,000 and the case was dismissed. Although a May 1960 DV news item announced that Esquire Productions, an independent Chicago-based production company, would be making a film about Touhy, the picture was not produced. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 May 1944.
---
Daily Variety
24 May 44
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 May 1960.
---
Film Daily
22 Oct 1942.
---
Film Daily
6 Jun 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Citizen-News
26 Sep 1944.
---
Hollywood Citizen-News
1 Nov 1949.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Feb 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 43
p. 2, 13
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 43
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 43
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 44
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Sep 44
p. 10.
Motion Picture Daily
24 May 1944.
---
Motion Picture Herald
19 Aug 1944.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Jun 43
p. 1362.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 May 44
p. 1910.
New York Times
12 Sep 1943.
---
New York Times
26 Mar 1943.
---
New York Times
5 Jun 44
p. 14.
New York Times
4 Dec 1947.
---
Variety
24 May 44
p. 10.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
George E. Stone
Arthur Aylsworth
Dick Rich
Jim Farley
Fred Chapman
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Studio armaments expert
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Escape of Roger Touhy
Prison Break
The Life of Touhy
The Terrible Terrys
Release Date:
July 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 3 June 1944
Production Date:
early April--early May 1943
retakes and addl seq September 1943 and March 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
3 June 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12952
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65
Length(in feet):
5,886
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9218
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1931, Captain Steven Warren, the chief investigator for the Chicago District Attorney's office, tries to arrest the henchmen of notorious gangster and bootlegger Roger Touhy for a series of crimes, but the frightened witnesses refuse to cooperate. Warren releases Touhy's cohorts--Herman "Owl" Banghart, Bernard "Troubles" O'Connor, Icebox Hamilton, Maxie Sharkey and Thomas J. "Smoke" Reardon--from custody but vows to pursue them. In Dec 1933, after Prohibition is repealed, Touhy decides to go "straight" because he is tired of pressure from Warren and the police. Needing money to buy a brewery, Touhy asks businessman Joseph P. Sutton to repay the $200,000 that he owes him. Although Sutton has the money, he claims that he does not, and his partner, Edward Latham, advises him to stall Touhy. Fed up with waiting, Touhy and his men kidnap Sutton and eventually collect $70,000 ransom from Latham. After Sutton is released, Warren pressures him to identify Touhy's gang as the kidnappers, and the reluctant businessman finally does so, although he does not reveal his prior connections to Touhy. While Touhy and his men are leaving the area, they are involved in a minor automobile accident that leads to their arrest. During their trial, Smoke testifies against Touhy and the others, who are found guilty and sent to serve ninety-nine-year sentences in the Stateville Peniteniary at Joliet, Illinois. Touhy is infuriated by Smoke's betrayal, and as the next eight years pass, continually tries to obtain a new trial. Smoke, who has been in hiding, is caught by some of Touhy's followers on the outside and framed for a crime he did not commit. Smoke is then sent ... +


In 1931, Captain Steven Warren, the chief investigator for the Chicago District Attorney's office, tries to arrest the henchmen of notorious gangster and bootlegger Roger Touhy for a series of crimes, but the frightened witnesses refuse to cooperate. Warren releases Touhy's cohorts--Herman "Owl" Banghart, Bernard "Troubles" O'Connor, Icebox Hamilton, Maxie Sharkey and Thomas J. "Smoke" Reardon--from custody but vows to pursue them. In Dec 1933, after Prohibition is repealed, Touhy decides to go "straight" because he is tired of pressure from Warren and the police. Needing money to buy a brewery, Touhy asks businessman Joseph P. Sutton to repay the $200,000 that he owes him. Although Sutton has the money, he claims that he does not, and his partner, Edward Latham, advises him to stall Touhy. Fed up with waiting, Touhy and his men kidnap Sutton and eventually collect $70,000 ransom from Latham. After Sutton is released, Warren pressures him to identify Touhy's gang as the kidnappers, and the reluctant businessman finally does so, although he does not reveal his prior connections to Touhy. While Touhy and his men are leaving the area, they are involved in a minor automobile accident that leads to their arrest. During their trial, Smoke testifies against Touhy and the others, who are found guilty and sent to serve ninety-nine-year sentences in the Stateville Peniteniary at Joliet, Illinois. Touhy is infuriated by Smoke's betrayal, and as the next eight years pass, continually tries to obtain a new trial. Smoke, who has been in hiding, is caught by some of Touhy's followers on the outside and framed for a crime he did not commit. Smoke is then sent to the penitentiary, and after being terrorized by Touhy, agrees to recant his testimony and help to free the gang. Smoke is killed by another prisoner before he can talk, however, and a desperate Touhy plans to escape from the prison. With the help of a prison guard, Touhy and his cellmate, George Carroll, escape along with Owl, Troubles, Icebox, Maxie and Rowden, another prisoner. Because the United States is now involved in the war, Touhy knows that the men will be arrested if they are caught without draft cards, and so orders Carroll and Rowden to rob unsuspecting citizens of their cards. The Federal Bureau of Investigation then takes over the case, as Touhy and his men have violated the Selective Service Act, first by not notifying the draft board of their "change of address," and then through their theft of the draft cards. Maxie's drunken carelessness causes Touhy to beat him viciously, and after Maxie and Icebox leave the gang, Icebox is arrested and informs the police of Touhy's whereabouts. Soon after, Rowden and Carroll are killed when F.B.I. agents attempt to apprehend them. Working with Warren, the F.B.I. then surrounds the apartment where Touhy, Troubles and Owl are living, and Owl convinces Touhy to surrender quietly, telling him that it is now time to pay for being on top for so long. Touhy and his men are then returned to Joliet. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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