Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Galveston . Although the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, lists Steve Fisher as a collaborator on early drafts of Ladislas Fodor's screenplay, the extent of Fisher's contribution to the completed film has not been determined. According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the the AMPAS Library, the PCA rejected three early versions of the screenplay because of "sex suggestiveness." The PCA also criticized the portrayal of the two leading male characters as being "immoral." The PCA finally approved the 17 Jul 1943 version of the script.
       According to HR news items and studio press releases, Twentieth Century-Fox purchased Fodor's original screen story as a vehicle for Jean Gabin, with Gene Tierney scheduled to co-star. Robinson was set in the lead role after Gabin turned it down, and actress Amelita Ward was tested for the part of "Katherine Hall" when the pregnant Tierney temporarily retired from the screen. In Aug 1942, HR announced that John M. Stahl would direct the picture, but in Sep 1942, Henry Hathaway was assigned to direct. The directing job eventually went to Lothar Mendes.
       According to a 10 Aug 1943 HR news item, the studio wanted to make "a bid for the Latin-American patronage by stocking the film with talent well known below the Rio Grande." Among the performers signed to appear in the café sequences, according to HR , were Noel DeSelva, Gilbert Ysais, Jose Barrios, Gracia Granada and Yvonne Lopes. The appearance of these performers in the completed film has not been confirmed, ... More Less

The working title of this film was Galveston . Although the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, lists Steve Fisher as a collaborator on early drafts of Ladislas Fodor's screenplay, the extent of Fisher's contribution to the completed film has not been determined. According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the the AMPAS Library, the PCA rejected three early versions of the screenplay because of "sex suggestiveness." The PCA also criticized the portrayal of the two leading male characters as being "immoral." The PCA finally approved the 17 Jul 1943 version of the script.
       According to HR news items and studio press releases, Twentieth Century-Fox purchased Fodor's original screen story as a vehicle for Jean Gabin, with Gene Tierney scheduled to co-star. Robinson was set in the lead role after Gabin turned it down, and actress Amelita Ward was tested for the part of "Katherine Hall" when the pregnant Tierney temporarily retired from the screen. In Aug 1942, HR announced that John M. Stahl would direct the picture, but in Sep 1942, Henry Hathaway was assigned to direct. The directing job eventually went to Lothar Mendes.
       According to a 10 Aug 1943 HR news item, the studio wanted to make "a bid for the Latin-American patronage by stocking the film with talent well known below the Rio Grande." Among the performers signed to appear in the café sequences, according to HR , were Noel DeSelva, Gilbert Ysais, Jose Barrios, Gracia Granada and Yvonne Lopes. The appearance of these performers in the completed film has not been confirmed, however. The titles and composers of the Spanish songs heard briefly in the film also have not been determined. According to studio press releases, violinist DeSelva was to perform several instrumental numbers, while another instrumental number, "Danza de Gracia," composed and performed by Ysais, was to serve as background for dancer Grace Poggi. Other actors listed in the cast by press releases include Harvey Karels, Rudolf Myzet, Paul Cristo and Larry Arnold. The appearance of these actors in the finished film has not been confirmed, however.
       A 17 Sep 1942 press release announced that producer Robert Bassler was trying to finalize arrangements for the film to be shot on location in Tampico, Mexico, as part of "Hollywood's search for locations to replace the expensive sets they are no longer allowed to build [due to war restrictions]." A 12 Oct 1942 HR news item also noted that Hathaway, the director assigned to the picture at the time, had hoped to scout locations in Mexico, although his trip was "postponed." On 5 Aug 1943, HR reported that the film company would go on a ten-day location trip aboard an oil tanker and shoot scenes as the ship sailed northward from San Diego or San Pedro, CA. Permission for the trip was granted by the Navy and the Maritime Commission, although it has not been confirmed that filming actually did take place on a tanker. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 Apr 1944.
---
Daily Variety
29 Mar 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Apr 44
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 1942.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Sep 1942.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Oct 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 43
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 43
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 44
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
30 Mar 1944.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
1 Apr 44
pp. 1825-26.
New York Times
2 Jun 44
p. 21.
Variety
29 Mar 44
p. 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story and adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Galveston
Release Date:
April 1944
Production Date:
late July--mid September 1943
addl seq 21 October--mid November 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
13 April 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12814
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in feet):
6,800
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8997
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Just as Captain Bart Manson is about to let the crew of his tanker, the Calhoun , go on leave in Tampico, Mexico, they receive a radio distress call from the freighter Ruth McIntyre , which has been torpedoed by a German U-boat. The tanker rushes to the sinking freighter and numerous passengers are rescued, including the lovely Katherine Hall. Bart is immediately attracted to Kathie, an American showgirl who has traveled from Paris and Lisbon to Havana while trying to return to the United States. Kathie is also interested in Bart, whose compassionate nature is revealed when he must tell a rescued passenger that her husband died during the attack. When the Calhoun reaches Tampico, however, complications arise for Kathie because she is not listed in the McIntyre 's log. Kathie, who stowed away on the freighter, has no passport or identification, and is about to be interned until her citizenship can be verified, when Bart posts bond for her. Kathie is remanded to Bart's custody and the couple go out for a night on the town. The evening is marred only by the aspersions of Bart's best friend and first mate, Fred Adamson, who thinks that Bart is a sucker for sponsoring Kathie. Bart, whose loneliness has become an unbearable weight, nevertheless proposes to Kathie when they happen to see a wedding party. The next morning, the couple realize that their marriage was prompted by Bart's drunkenness, but Kathie vows to make him happy anyway. Soon after, Bart and Kathie are hosting a reception at their new home when Bart and Fred quarrel over ... +


Just as Captain Bart Manson is about to let the crew of his tanker, the Calhoun , go on leave in Tampico, Mexico, they receive a radio distress call from the freighter Ruth McIntyre , which has been torpedoed by a German U-boat. The tanker rushes to the sinking freighter and numerous passengers are rescued, including the lovely Katherine Hall. Bart is immediately attracted to Kathie, an American showgirl who has traveled from Paris and Lisbon to Havana while trying to return to the United States. Kathie is also interested in Bart, whose compassionate nature is revealed when he must tell a rescued passenger that her husband died during the attack. When the Calhoun reaches Tampico, however, complications arise for Kathie because she is not listed in the McIntyre 's log. Kathie, who stowed away on the freighter, has no passport or identification, and is about to be interned until her citizenship can be verified, when Bart posts bond for her. Kathie is remanded to Bart's custody and the couple go out for a night on the town. The evening is marred only by the aspersions of Bart's best friend and first mate, Fred Adamson, who thinks that Bart is a sucker for sponsoring Kathie. Bart, whose loneliness has become an unbearable weight, nevertheless proposes to Kathie when they happen to see a wedding party. The next morning, the couple realize that their marriage was prompted by Bart's drunkenness, but Kathie vows to make him happy anyway. Soon after, Bart and Kathie are hosting a reception at their new home when Bart and Fred quarrel over Fred's insulting remarks about Kathie. Later, Bart receives orders to ship out, and although he tries to leave without alerting Kathie, as no civilians are supposed to know the tanker's sailing schedule, she comes to the dock to bid him farewell. Once they are at sea, Bart and Fred work together grudgingly, but their quarrel is forgetten when a U-boat is sighted. Bart's plan to outrun the enemy vessel is thwarted when Fred, who wants to surrender their oil cargo to save the crew's lives, stops the engine. The tanker is torpedoed and many of the crew, including Fred, are lost. When the devastated Bart returns to Tampico, the investigating officers reveal their suspicions that Kathie was the spy who alerted the Germans about the tanker's sailing. Bart still loves Kathie too much to turn her over to the authorities, and so orders her to leave their home and never return. Kathie tells Bart that he is a fool, and later, after he has lost his captaincy papers, Bart goes on a drunken spree with the mysterious Dolores Garcia, who had previously been dating Fred. Bart's former shipmates refuse to speak to him as he loudly badmouths the United States, but his sentiments win him an introduction to Kruger, the leader of an Axis spy network working out of Tampico. Kruger asks Bart to find out the cargos and courses of the twenty tankers leaving that night, and Bart, who knows that a woman agent with the initial "K" works for Kruger, asks for a woman's help. Fearing that the agent will be Kathie, Bart is relieved when he is introduced to Karla, although he quickly dismisses her before meeting with Dolores and Valdez, an officer from his tanker. Dolores and Valdez are actually government agents working undercover to ferret out the spies, and Bart, attempting to clear Kathie, is working with them. Bart returns to Kruger's office, but his real alliances are revealed by Karla, who had followed him to his meeting with Valdez and Dolores. After Bart fires a warning shot, the government agents round up the gang. Bart then follows the messenger taking the sailing information to a radio operator, who turns out to be Fred. Bart is astonished to see his friend alive, and then outraged when Fred reveals that he is the spy who has been helping the Germans sink American ships. Fred begs for leniency, but Bart is forced to shoot him when he reaches for his pistol. Later, Bart finds Kathie, whose citizenship has been established, as she is packing to leave for the States. Bart apologizes to Kathie for not trusting her, and the couple reconcile. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.