The Whistler (1944)

59-60 mins | Mystery | 30 March 1944

Director:

William Castle

Producer:

Rudolph Flothow

Cinematographer:

James S. Brown Jr.

Editor:

Jerome Thoms

Production Designer:

George Van Marter

Production Company:

Darmour, Inc.
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HISTORY

This was the first entry in Columbia "Whistler" series. Although not conceived as part of a series, audience reaction to this film was so favorable that the studio decided to produce more "Whistler" pictures, according to HR . The series, which was based on a popular CBS radio series of the same name, consisted of eight films. The last entry was the 1948 film The Return of the Whistler . Richard Dix starred in all but the last film, but portrayed a different character in each, sometimes playing the hero and sometimes the villian. William Castle directed four entries in the series. Each film in the series began with the shadowy figure of "The Whistler," who would whistle a haunting tune and declare "I am the whistler, I know many strange tales." He would then introduce the story. The voice of The Whistler would also close each story, revealing the fate of the protagonist.
       The radio series, which began in 1942, was developed by J. Donald Wilson, who also wrote the first entry of the film series. That series also featured the haunting theme music written by Wilbur Hatch and the framing device of The Whistler. In the radio series, Bill Forman, Marvin Miller, Joseph Kearns and Everett Clark spoke the words of The Whistler, who was never a participant in the drama, but rather a narrator and commentator. Except for Otto Forrest, the actor who portrayed The Whistler in the films was not identified by contemporary sources. From 1954 to 1955 Joel Malone produced an anthology series called The Whistler for the CBS television network. In that series, Bill Forman ... More Less

This was the first entry in Columbia "Whistler" series. Although not conceived as part of a series, audience reaction to this film was so favorable that the studio decided to produce more "Whistler" pictures, according to HR . The series, which was based on a popular CBS radio series of the same name, consisted of eight films. The last entry was the 1948 film The Return of the Whistler . Richard Dix starred in all but the last film, but portrayed a different character in each, sometimes playing the hero and sometimes the villian. William Castle directed four entries in the series. Each film in the series began with the shadowy figure of "The Whistler," who would whistle a haunting tune and declare "I am the whistler, I know many strange tales." He would then introduce the story. The voice of The Whistler would also close each story, revealing the fate of the protagonist.
       The radio series, which began in 1942, was developed by J. Donald Wilson, who also wrote the first entry of the film series. That series also featured the haunting theme music written by Wilbur Hatch and the framing device of The Whistler. In the radio series, Bill Forman, Marvin Miller, Joseph Kearns and Everett Clark spoke the words of The Whistler, who was never a participant in the drama, but rather a narrator and commentator. Except for Otto Forrest, the actor who portrayed The Whistler in the films was not identified by contemporary sources. From 1954 to 1955 Joel Malone produced an anthology series called The Whistler for the CBS television network. In that series, Bill Forman spoke the lines of The Whistler. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Jul 1944.
---
Daily Variety
21 Mar 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Jun 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 44
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Mar 44
p. 1785.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 May 44
p. 1886.
New York Times
29 Apr 44
p. 12.
Variety
3 May 44
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the radio series The Whistler created by J. Donald Wilson (16 May 1942--8 Sep 1955).
MUSIC
"The Whistler" theme music by Wilbur Hatch.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
30 March 1944
Production Date:
21 January--7 February 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
30 March 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12806
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
59-60
Length(in feet):
5,400
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9992
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a cheap bar, Earl Conrad hires Lefty Vigran to arrange for his murder by the following Friday. After Vigran agrees to take the job, he hands a slip of paper bearing Conrad's name and address to a deaf-mute and instructs him to deliver it to the killer. When Vigran leaves the bar that night, he is shot and killed by two police officers for resisting arrest. Meanwhile, Conrad returns home and fires his butler, Jennings, offering him $5,000 in severance pay. The next day, Conrad, the part owner of a small manufacturing company, notifies his partner, Charles McNear, and his secretary, Alice Walker, that he is leaving the firm. Conrad then confides to Alice that he blames himself for the death of his wife Claire. Conrad explains that he convinced Claire to take a cruise with him in hopes of saving their marriage. When the ship sank, Conrad saved several of the passengers, but let Claire slip out of his arms, and consequently feels responsible for her death. That night, Conrad returns home and is startled by a man who claims to be a repairman from the phone company. Conrad is certain that the repairman is really his assassin until the man discovers that the phone lines have been cut, fixes them and leaves. The killer, who is lurking in the shadows, is about to act when Alice rings the doorbell, concerned about Conrad. From the window, the killer takes aim at Conrad but is interrupted by the sound of whistling. The killer then goes to his room and is greeted by his friend, Gorman. While conversing with Gorman, the killer ... +


In a cheap bar, Earl Conrad hires Lefty Vigran to arrange for his murder by the following Friday. After Vigran agrees to take the job, he hands a slip of paper bearing Conrad's name and address to a deaf-mute and instructs him to deliver it to the killer. When Vigran leaves the bar that night, he is shot and killed by two police officers for resisting arrest. Meanwhile, Conrad returns home and fires his butler, Jennings, offering him $5,000 in severance pay. The next day, Conrad, the part owner of a small manufacturing company, notifies his partner, Charles McNear, and his secretary, Alice Walker, that he is leaving the firm. Conrad then confides to Alice that he blames himself for the death of his wife Claire. Conrad explains that he convinced Claire to take a cruise with him in hopes of saving their marriage. When the ship sank, Conrad saved several of the passengers, but let Claire slip out of his arms, and consequently feels responsible for her death. That night, Conrad returns home and is startled by a man who claims to be a repairman from the phone company. Conrad is certain that the repairman is really his assassin until the man discovers that the phone lines have been cut, fixes them and leaves. The killer, who is lurking in the shadows, is about to act when Alice rings the doorbell, concerned about Conrad. From the window, the killer takes aim at Conrad but is interrupted by the sound of whistling. The killer then goes to his room and is greeted by his friend, Gorman. While conversing with Gorman, the killer conceives of the idea of frightening Conrad to death. The next day at the office, Alice hands Conrad a telegram from the Red Cross, notifying him that Claire is alive and is a prisoner in a Japanese internment camp. His desire to live renewed, Conrad tries to contact Vigran to cancel the contract. Upon learning that Vigran is dead, Conrad returns to the scene of their meeting to question the bartender. A woman at the bar overhears the conversation, and after the bartender leaves, she offers to drive Conrad to a roadhouse frequented by Vigran. As they wind their way along a mountainous road, the woman reveals that she is Vigran's wife Toni and accuses Conrad of arranging her husband's death. Announcing that she plans to avenge her husband, Toni speeds recklessly around the hairpin curves, attracting that attention of a police car. The police pursue Toni, and she sends her car spinning out of control, over a cliff. Toni is killed in the wreck, but Conrad escapes and stumbles home, weak and disheveled. Alice, who is in love with Conrad, is waiting for him there. When two men, claiming to be police, arrive at the door, Conrad flees out the back and takes refuge in a flophouse. The killer trails him there and rents a bed. In the middle of the night, Conrad is awakened by a bum and warned that the clerk is calling the police about him. The bum leads Conrad into a basement and is about to rob him when the killer shoots the bum from the window. The next day, Conrad, exhausted, sees a newspaper headline proclaiming that he is an amnesia victim and asking for the public's help in locating him. Aware that he is being followed by the killer, Conrad goes to the harbor, where he collapses. He is revived by the dock watchman, who recognizes him from the picture in the paper. After helping Conrad to shelter, the watchman goes to call Alice. Alice has just received word that Claire has died in the internment camp when the watchman phones with news that he has found Conrad. Alice hurries to the docks, but when she arrives, Conrad is missing. Conrad, irrational from fear and exhaustion, has decided to stow away on a Red Cross Mercy ship, but is discovered by the police and escorted to the harbor master's office. Alice finds him there and as they talk, the killer takes aim from the window and shoots. He misses Conrad, but the police fire back and kill him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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