The Clock (1945)

90 mins | Romance | May 1945

Producer:

Arthur Freed

Cinematographer:

George Folsey

Editor:

George White

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, William Ferrari

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

News items in HR indicate that director Jack Conway worked on the film for one week in Jun 1944 "lining up background shots" of New York City. According to a studio memo dated 27 Jun 1944, Conway withdrew from the film due to illness and was replaced by Fred Zinnemann. The extent of Conway's contribution to the final film has not been determined. A 21 Jun 1944 HR news item indicates that M-G-M originally wanted Tay Garnett to replace Conway. Zinnemann directed the film until the end of Aug 1944, when he was replaced by Vincente Minnelli, whom Garland married in 1945. According to modern sources, Zinnemann's removal from the picture stemmed from his strained rapport with Judy Garland, and came about shortly after Garland had complained to producer Arthur Freed about their incompatibility. Modern sources also note that M-G-M bought the screen rights to Gallico's unpublished short story in 1943 for $50,000 and assigned Margaret Green to write the screenplay. In Jan 1944, Freed, unhappy with Green's script, replaced her with Joseph Schrank and Robert Nathan.
       Although their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed, various news items in HR list the following actors in the cast: Florence Allen, Jessie Arnold, Paulita Arviza, Estelle Aterre, Charles Bates, Jack Baxley, Mary Benoit, Margaret Bert, Mary Bovard, Volta Boyer, Steve Brodie, Ralph Brooke, Sally Ann Brown, Joan Carroll, Tony Carson, Douglas Carter, Lucille Casey, Alfredo Ceraldi, Wheaton Chambers, Eddy Chandler, Lyle Clark, Lucille Curtis, Kay Deslys, Joe Dominguez, George Dudley, Major Farrell, Nellie Farrell, Julie Gibson, Palmer Gran, Tom Herbert, Gertrude Hoffman, Reed Howes, Teddy Infuhr, Milton Kibbee, ... More Less

News items in HR indicate that director Jack Conway worked on the film for one week in Jun 1944 "lining up background shots" of New York City. According to a studio memo dated 27 Jun 1944, Conway withdrew from the film due to illness and was replaced by Fred Zinnemann. The extent of Conway's contribution to the final film has not been determined. A 21 Jun 1944 HR news item indicates that M-G-M originally wanted Tay Garnett to replace Conway. Zinnemann directed the film until the end of Aug 1944, when he was replaced by Vincente Minnelli, whom Garland married in 1945. According to modern sources, Zinnemann's removal from the picture stemmed from his strained rapport with Judy Garland, and came about shortly after Garland had complained to producer Arthur Freed about their incompatibility. Modern sources also note that M-G-M bought the screen rights to Gallico's unpublished short story in 1943 for $50,000 and assigned Margaret Green to write the screenplay. In Jan 1944, Freed, unhappy with Green's script, replaced her with Joseph Schrank and Robert Nathan.
       Although their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed, various news items in HR list the following actors in the cast: Florence Allen, Jessie Arnold, Paulita Arviza, Estelle Aterre, Charles Bates, Jack Baxley, Mary Benoit, Margaret Bert, Mary Bovard, Volta Boyer, Steve Brodie, Ralph Brooke, Sally Ann Brown, Joan Carroll, Tony Carson, Douglas Carter, Lucille Casey, Alfredo Ceraldi, Wheaton Chambers, Eddy Chandler, Lyle Clark, Lucille Curtis, Kay Deslys, Joe Dominguez, George Dudley, Major Farrell, Nellie Farrell, Julie Gibson, Palmer Gran, Tom Herbert, Gertrude Hoffman, Reed Howes, Teddy Infuhr, Milton Kibbee, Charlotte Knight, Patricia Knox, Michael Knudsen, Helen Koford, Nolan Leary, Jack Lee, Babe London, Grace Lord, Frank McClure, Beryl McCutcheon, Gordon McDonald, Leila McIntyre, Gloria Marlen, Nita Matthews, Sybil Merritt, Robert Milasch, Phillip Morris, Tom Murray, John Mylong, Alix Nagy, George Nakes, Jack Orkin, George Peters, Lee Phelps, June Terry Pickerell, Whitten Platt, Rudy Rama, Robin Raymond, Naomi Scher, Michelle Rae Slaboda, Larry Spears, Florence Stevens, Doris Stone, Henry Sylvester, Ethel Tobin, Brad Towne, Alice Wallace and Cecil Weston. HR production charts list Hume Cronyn, Louis Jean Heydt and Audrey Totter in the cast, but they did not appear in the final film.
       The Clock marked Judy Garland's first dramatic, non-singing role in a film. The song "If I Had You," which was used in the film as background music, was recorded by Garland and The Merry Macs and released by Decca in 1945. James and Lucile Gleason, who play "Al Henry" and his wife, were also husband and wife in real life. Rogers Edens, who is seen playing the piano in one scene, was the well-known composer and musical arranger who worked on many of Garlands M-G-M musicals. Producer Arthur Freed also has a brief role in the film, as a man lighting a cigarette for "Joe Allen." Although background footage was filmed on location in New York City, contemporary news items indicate that many sequences were filmed at M-G-M's Culver City lot, where reproductions of the interiors of famous New York City landmarks, including Pennsylvania Station and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, were constructed. A biography of Minnelli notes that New York City was recreated through the use of photographic plates. The plates served as backdrops displayed through rear projection while the live action took place in front. Judy Garland recreated her role for the Lux Radio Theatre version of the story, which was broadcast on 28 Jan 1946. John Hodiak co-starred with Garland in the radio version. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Mar 1945.
---
Daily Variety
22 Mar 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Mar 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 44
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 44
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 44
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 44
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 44
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 44
p. 46.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 44
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 44
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 44
pp. 8, 12
Hollywood Reporter
26 Sep 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Oct 44
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 44
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 45
p. 13.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Oct 44
p. 2142.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Mar 45
p. 2374.
New York Times
4 May 45
p. 23.
Variety
28 Mar 45
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam for background shooting in New York City
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Matte paintings, cam
DETAILS
Release Date:
May 1945
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 3 May 1945
Production Date:
31 July--21 November 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 March 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13200
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,129
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10566
SYNOPSIS

Soon after arriving in New York City to begin a two-day leave, Corporal Joe Allen meets Alice Maybery, an attractive secretary, and falls instantly in love with her. Joe and Alice spend the afternoon sightseeing around New York and become better acquainted, then, following their visit to Central Park and the Metropolitan Museum, the two bid each other farewell. As Alice boards a bus for home, Joe is unable to bear the thought that he may never see her again and chases after the bus on foot. Seeing his earnestness, Alice agrees to meet him later in the evening. When Alice tells her roommate and co-worker, Helen, about her new acquaintance, Helen advises her to stay away from soldiers and warns her that they only break hearts when they leave. Alice, however, disregards Helen's advice, and meets Joe for dinner. As the evening progresses, Alice and Joe become so absorbed in their romantic pursuits that they forget the time and accidentally miss the last bus. Joe later hails a milk truck, mistaking its lights for a taxi, and asks for a ride home. The milk truck driver, Al Henry, agrees to take Joe and Alice home but only if they first accompany him on his milk run. The milk run extends into the early morning hours and by the end, the three have become fast friends. As dawn approches, Al takes Joe and Alice to a diner for breakfast, where a drunk engages Al in an argument and punches him. Because Al is injured and unable to continue his milk run, Joe and Alice complete his deliveries. Later that morning, Al brings Joe ... +


Soon after arriving in New York City to begin a two-day leave, Corporal Joe Allen meets Alice Maybery, an attractive secretary, and falls instantly in love with her. Joe and Alice spend the afternoon sightseeing around New York and become better acquainted, then, following their visit to Central Park and the Metropolitan Museum, the two bid each other farewell. As Alice boards a bus for home, Joe is unable to bear the thought that he may never see her again and chases after the bus on foot. Seeing his earnestness, Alice agrees to meet him later in the evening. When Alice tells her roommate and co-worker, Helen, about her new acquaintance, Helen advises her to stay away from soldiers and warns her that they only break hearts when they leave. Alice, however, disregards Helen's advice, and meets Joe for dinner. As the evening progresses, Alice and Joe become so absorbed in their romantic pursuits that they forget the time and accidentally miss the last bus. Joe later hails a milk truck, mistaking its lights for a taxi, and asks for a ride home. The milk truck driver, Al Henry, agrees to take Joe and Alice home but only if they first accompany him on his milk run. The milk run extends into the early morning hours and by the end, the three have become fast friends. As dawn approches, Al takes Joe and Alice to a diner for breakfast, where a drunk engages Al in an argument and punches him. Because Al is injured and unable to continue his milk run, Joe and Alice complete his deliveries. Later that morning, Al brings Joe and Alice to his home, where Al's wife cooks breakfast for everyone. Mrs. Henry sees the love that is now obvious between Alice and Joe and suggests that they marry right away. Alice and Joe agree, but their wedding plans are later spoiled when they become separated in a crowded subway station. Joe and Alice begin a desperate search for each other, but both soon realize that they have too little information about each other to know where to look or ask authorities for help. Joe eventually finds Alice when they meet at Pennsylvania Station, and immediately takes her to City Hall to get married. A series of bureaucratic complications over blood tests delay their marriage, but Alice and Joe eventually get their City Hall wedding when they appeal their case directly to a judge. Disappointed by their rushed and spare wedding, Alice starts to cry, then she and Joe decide to repeat their vows in a church before Joe goes back to his post to resume his military service. With their vows firmly sealed, Joe bids Alice farewell the following morning, confident that they will be reunited as husband and wife when he returns from the war. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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