Don't Fence Me In (1945)

71 mins | Western | 20 October 1945

Director:

John English

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Production Designer:

Hilyard Brown

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

A film clip of Roy Rogers singing Cole Porter's popular song "Don't Fence Me In," taken from this picture, was featured in the 1946 Warner Bros. biography of Porter, Night and Day (see below). Modern sources include the following players in the cast: Arthur Space, Helen Talbot, Kenner G. Kemp and Sam ... More Less

A film clip of Roy Rogers singing Cole Porter's popular song "Don't Fence Me In," taken from this picture, was featured in the 1946 Warner Bros. biography of Porter, Night and Day (see below). Modern sources include the following players in the cast: Arthur Space, Helen Talbot, Kenner G. Kemp and Sam Ash. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Oct 1945.
---
Daily Variety
22 Oct 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Oct 45
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 45
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 45
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Oct 45
p. 2687.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Oct 45
p. 2693.
Variety
24 Oct 45
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch arr
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec optical eff
Spec optical eff
Matte paintings
Transparency projection shots
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Don't Fence Me In," music and lyrics by Cole Porter
"Choo Choo Polka," music and lyrics by Mike Shore and Zeke Manners
"My Little Buckaroo," music and lyrics by Jack Scholl and M. K. Jerome
+
SONGS
"Don't Fence Me In," music and lyrics by Cole Porter
"Choo Choo Polka," music and lyrics by Mike Shore and Zeke Manners
"My Little Buckaroo," music and lyrics by Jack Scholl and M. K. Jerome
"The Last Roundup," music and lyrics by Billy Hill
"Along the Navajo Trail," music and lyrics by Larry Markes, Dick Charles and Eddie Delange
"A Kiss Goodnight," music and lyrics by Freddie Slack, Floyd Victor and Woody Herman
"Tumbling Tumbleweeds," music and lyrics by Bob Nolan.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 October 1945
Production Date:
mid July--early August 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
11 October 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13524
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71
Length(in feet):
6,415
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11124
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Spread Magazine investigative photographer Toni Ames is tricked by her editor, Jack Chandler, into going out West to investigate the legend of Wildcat Kelly, an infamous outlaw who was killed forty years earlier. Although a $50,000 reward was paid to the two men who brought in Kelly's body, an old man named Sam McCoy has told one of Chandler's reporters that the man who was buried was not Kelly. Toni begins her investigation in a small town called Twin Wells, where she meets an old cowpoke, "Gabby" Whitaker, who claims that he knew Kelly. Toni follows Gabby to the R Barr Dude Ranch, which he runs with his pal, Roy Rogers, who quickly becomes irritated by Toni's snooping. As the days pass, Toni deduces that Gabby is Kelly, and despite Roy's pleas that Gabby has gone straight, and that to expose him now will only cause trouble, Toni prints the story with photographs of Gabby. Governor Thompson, upset that state monies were falsely paid for a reward, orders that Gabby be investigated. Later, when an unidentified gunman shoots and wounds Gabby, Roy accuses Toni of endangering the old man's life. Hoping to identify Gabby's attacker, Roy leaks the news that Gabby is dead and holds a funeral for him. Cliff Anson, the man who shot Gabby, attends the funeral, and with the aid of Toni's photography, Roy and the others track him to the Westward Ho Resort. Roy, Toni and their friends then obtain jobs as entertainers at the resort in order to investigate the connection between Anson and Henry Bennett, the resort's owner. When Anson sees Gabby at the ... +


Spread Magazine investigative photographer Toni Ames is tricked by her editor, Jack Chandler, into going out West to investigate the legend of Wildcat Kelly, an infamous outlaw who was killed forty years earlier. Although a $50,000 reward was paid to the two men who brought in Kelly's body, an old man named Sam McCoy has told one of Chandler's reporters that the man who was buried was not Kelly. Toni begins her investigation in a small town called Twin Wells, where she meets an old cowpoke, "Gabby" Whitaker, who claims that he knew Kelly. Toni follows Gabby to the R Barr Dude Ranch, which he runs with his pal, Roy Rogers, who quickly becomes irritated by Toni's snooping. As the days pass, Toni deduces that Gabby is Kelly, and despite Roy's pleas that Gabby has gone straight, and that to expose him now will only cause trouble, Toni prints the story with photographs of Gabby. Governor Thompson, upset that state monies were falsely paid for a reward, orders that Gabby be investigated. Later, when an unidentified gunman shoots and wounds Gabby, Roy accuses Toni of endangering the old man's life. Hoping to identify Gabby's attacker, Roy leaks the news that Gabby is dead and holds a funeral for him. Cliff Anson, the man who shot Gabby, attends the funeral, and with the aid of Toni's photography, Roy and the others track him to the Westward Ho Resort. Roy, Toni and their friends then obtain jobs as entertainers at the resort in order to investigate the connection between Anson and Henry Bennett, the resort's owner. When Anson sees Gabby at the resort, he goes to Bennett in a panic. Bennett kills him and implicates Gabby in the crime because the gun he used was identified as Kelly's forty years before. Roy and Gabby elude the police, however, then go to see Sheriff Ben Duncan, who confirms that the gun was sold to Bennett after Kelly was buried. Gabby, who had staged his own death as a means to go straight, was not aware that Bennett and his accomplice, McCoy, had substituted a real body for Gabby's sack of sand. As Gabby is explaining the situation to the sheriff, Bennett and his gang arrive, but Roy, Gabby and their men overpower the criminals and bring them to justice. Soon after, Gabby discusses his former life of crime with the governor and reveals that he donated all the stolen money to various charities. As the governor is questioning Gabby about a sum of money not accounted for, Roy reveals that the money was used to buy the Westward Ho in the governor's name for state employees. As the employees are applauding the governor's apparent generosity, Gabby takes a photograph of Roy and Toni singing together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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