Leave It to Blondie (1945)

74 mins | Comedy | 22 February 1945

Director:

Abby Berlin

Writer:

Connie Lee

Producer:

Burt Kelly

Cinematographer:

Frank F. Planer

Editor:

Al Clark

Production Designer:

Perry Smith

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Leave It to Blondie marked Abby Berlin's first film as a director. Prior to this film, Berlin worked as an assistant director. While HR production charts list Mary Newton in the cast, her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry Blondie! in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

Leave It to Blondie marked Abby Berlin's first film as a director. Prior to this film, Berlin worked as an assistant director. While HR production charts list Mary Newton in the cast, her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. For additional information on the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry Blondie! in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.0391. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Feb 1945.
---
Daily Variety
23 Mar 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Feb 1945.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Nov 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jan 45
p. 1.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Dec 44
p. 2216.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Mar 45
p. 2381.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Mar 45
p. 20.
Variety
11 Apr 45
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the comic strip "Blondie" created by Chic Young, owned and copyrighted by King Features Syndicate, Inc. (1930--).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"That Blue-Eyed Sweetheart of Mine," words and music by Saul Chaplin
"An Ounce o' Bounce," words and music by Saul Chaplin and Walter G. Samuels.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
22 February 1945
Production Date:
30 October--24 November 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 February 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13098
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
74
Length(in feet):
6,501
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10532
SYNOPSIS

Though living on a tight budget, Blondie Bumstead and her worrying husband Dagwood manage to scrape together enough money to make a one hundred dollar contribution to the Underprivileged Children's Camp Fund. A terrible blunder is made, however, when Blondie and Dagwood each contribute one hundred dollars to the fund without realizing that the other has written a check. The couple knows that unless more money is deposited in their bank account, one of the checks will bounce. While Dagwood fears that his bounced check will likely bring on the violent wrath of Elmer Fuddle, the man to whom he gave his check, Blondie fears that her bounced check would certainly result in her ostracism from Emily Harding's social circle. An apparent solution to the Bumsteads' financial woes comes when Dagwood and Blondie's son Alexander finds a song manuscript written by Dagwood's uncle Horace and enters it in Laura Meredith's song contest. One day, Dagwood's co-workers take him to a tea room to see a fortune-teller. Blondie, who is also at the tea room, overhears the fortune-teller telling Dagwood that a black-eyed brunette will be entering his life, and she becomes suspicious. Blondie realizes that her husband loves her, though, when she discovers that the title of the song entered in the contest in Dagwood's name, "That Blue-Eyed Sweetheart of Mine," must refer to her. Meanwhile, Dagwood's boss, J. C. Dithers, decides to sell Mrs. Meredith some worthless real estate for her children's camp, and uses Dagwood and his song entry as an excuse to meet her. Soon after Dagwood learns that his song has been selected as one of the top three contenders for first ... +


Though living on a tight budget, Blondie Bumstead and her worrying husband Dagwood manage to scrape together enough money to make a one hundred dollar contribution to the Underprivileged Children's Camp Fund. A terrible blunder is made, however, when Blondie and Dagwood each contribute one hundred dollars to the fund without realizing that the other has written a check. The couple knows that unless more money is deposited in their bank account, one of the checks will bounce. While Dagwood fears that his bounced check will likely bring on the violent wrath of Elmer Fuddle, the man to whom he gave his check, Blondie fears that her bounced check would certainly result in her ostracism from Emily Harding's social circle. An apparent solution to the Bumsteads' financial woes comes when Dagwood and Blondie's son Alexander finds a song manuscript written by Dagwood's uncle Horace and enters it in Laura Meredith's song contest. One day, Dagwood's co-workers take him to a tea room to see a fortune-teller. Blondie, who is also at the tea room, overhears the fortune-teller telling Dagwood that a black-eyed brunette will be entering his life, and she becomes suspicious. Blondie realizes that her husband loves her, though, when she discovers that the title of the song entered in the contest in Dagwood's name, "That Blue-Eyed Sweetheart of Mine," must refer to her. Meanwhile, Dagwood's boss, J. C. Dithers, decides to sell Mrs. Meredith some worthless real estate for her children's camp, and uses Dagwood and his song entry as an excuse to meet her. Soon after Dagwood learns that his song has been selected as one of the top three contenders for first prize in the song competition, and that he must sing his song to qualify for the money, he begins taking singing lessons from a woman who happens to be a black-eyed brunette. When Blondie catches sight of the pretty singing coach, she runs away in tears and locks her husband out of the house. Later, Dagwood tries in vain to get back into his house and is forced to spend the night in a hotel. The next morning, the day of the competition, Dagwood wakes up with a terrible cold and loses his voice. Instead of singing his song himself, Dagwood tries to fake it by mouthing the words to a pre-recorded version of the song. Dagwood's luck worsens when the needle on the record skips and his ruse is exposed. Chaos ensues when Mrs. Meredith discovers the ploy, but Dagwood saves himself with a complete confession. Impressed by Dagwood's honesty, Mrs. Meredith decides to buy Mr. Dithers' property and award Dagwood with a five hundred dollar bonus. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.