Pride of the Marines (1945)

119-120 mins | Drama | 1 September 1945

Director:

Delmer Daves

Producer:

Jerry Wald

Cinematographer:

Peverell Marley

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Leo Kuter

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's working title was This Love of Ours . As depicted in the film, Al Schmid was a welder who won fame during the battle of Guadacanal when he killed 200 Japanese soldiers during a night attack. Schmid was blinded by a grenade early in the morning, but refused to relinquish his position and continued to fight by having a wounded soldier tell him where to point his gun. A 3 Sep 1945 article in Time notes that at that time Schmid was living in Philadelphia with his wife and one-year-old son. According to the article, Schmid spent his time typing letters to his friends, listening to Bing Crosby recordings and fishing. His eyesight was limited to the perception of bright colors and moving objects. News items in HR add the following information about the production: Some scenes were shot on location in Philadelphia and at the San Diego Naval Hospital. Ann Doran was borrowed from Paramount for the picture. Cinematographer Sol Polito substituted for Peverell Marley while the latter was out with the flu. In an article in 12 Jan 1946 issue of SEP , actor John Garfield cited "Al Schmid" as his favorite movie role. The writer Albert Maltz, who was nominated for an Academy Award for the screenplay of Pride of the Marines , was later blacklisted. John Garfield and Eleanor Parker reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 31 Dec ... More Less

The film's working title was This Love of Ours . As depicted in the film, Al Schmid was a welder who won fame during the battle of Guadacanal when he killed 200 Japanese soldiers during a night attack. Schmid was blinded by a grenade early in the morning, but refused to relinquish his position and continued to fight by having a wounded soldier tell him where to point his gun. A 3 Sep 1945 article in Time notes that at that time Schmid was living in Philadelphia with his wife and one-year-old son. According to the article, Schmid spent his time typing letters to his friends, listening to Bing Crosby recordings and fishing. His eyesight was limited to the perception of bright colors and moving objects. News items in HR add the following information about the production: Some scenes were shot on location in Philadelphia and at the San Diego Naval Hospital. Ann Doran was borrowed from Paramount for the picture. Cinematographer Sol Polito substituted for Peverell Marley while the latter was out with the flu. In an article in 12 Jan 1946 issue of SEP , actor John Garfield cited "Al Schmid" as his favorite movie role. The writer Albert Maltz, who was nominated for an Academy Award for the screenplay of Pride of the Marines , was later blacklisted. John Garfield and Eleanor Parker reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 31 Dec 1945. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Aug 1945.
---
Daily Variety
7 Aug 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
7 Aug 45
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 45
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 45
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 45
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
30 Dec 44
p. 2250.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Aug 45
p. 2589.
New York Times
25 Aug 45
p. 7.
The Saturday Evening Post
12 Jan 1946.
---
Time
3 Sep 1945.
---
Variety
8 Aug 45
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Fill-in photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Supv art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch arr
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book Al Schmid, Marine by Roger Butterfield (New York, 1944).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
This Love of Ours
Release Date:
1 September 1945
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 24 August 1945
Production Date:
mid November 1944--mid February 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 September 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13451
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
119-120
Length(in feet):
10,757
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10661
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Philadelphia, in 1941, confirmed bachelor Al Schmid, a welder, lives with his friends, Jim and Ella May Merchant, and their young daughter Lucy. The happily married Ella continually introduces Al to eligible women. To discourage her, Al is very rude to Ruth Hartley, whom Ella has invited to dinner, and is shocked when, at the end of the evening, Ruth chides him for his boorish behavior. Chastened, Al asks for another chance, and he and Ruth grow to love each other. After the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Al enlists in the Marines. Before he leaves, he advises Ruth to forget him, but she disregards his advice, and early the next morning, sees him off at the train station. There, Al finally admits that he loves her and asks her to wait for him. Al is sent to Guadalcanal in the South Pacific, where he and other Marines defend the island from a Japanese attack. After killing almost 200 Japanese soldiers, Al is blinded by a grenade. At the naval hospital in San Diego, Red Cross nurse Virginia Pfeiffer encourages Al to tell Ruth about his eyes, but Al is convinced that his blindness is only temporary. When an operation fails to restore his sight, Al is bitter and refuses to learn how to function as a blind man. Not wanting Ruth to be tied to a helpless man, Al dictates a letter to Virginia breaking off their engagement. When a broken-hearted Ruth calls Al, he will not speak to her, but Virginia secretly tells Ruth about Al's blindness and advises her to keep writing to him. ... +


In Philadelphia, in 1941, confirmed bachelor Al Schmid, a welder, lives with his friends, Jim and Ella May Merchant, and their young daughter Lucy. The happily married Ella continually introduces Al to eligible women. To discourage her, Al is very rude to Ruth Hartley, whom Ella has invited to dinner, and is shocked when, at the end of the evening, Ruth chides him for his boorish behavior. Chastened, Al asks for another chance, and he and Ruth grow to love each other. After the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Al enlists in the Marines. Before he leaves, he advises Ruth to forget him, but she disregards his advice, and early the next morning, sees him off at the train station. There, Al finally admits that he loves her and asks her to wait for him. Al is sent to Guadalcanal in the South Pacific, where he and other Marines defend the island from a Japanese attack. After killing almost 200 Japanese soldiers, Al is blinded by a grenade. At the naval hospital in San Diego, Red Cross nurse Virginia Pfeiffer encourages Al to tell Ruth about his eyes, but Al is convinced that his blindness is only temporary. When an operation fails to restore his sight, Al is bitter and refuses to learn how to function as a blind man. Not wanting Ruth to be tied to a helpless man, Al dictates a letter to Virginia breaking off their engagement. When a broken-hearted Ruth calls Al, he will not speak to her, but Virginia secretly tells Ruth about Al's blindness and advises her to keep writing to him. Al learns that he is not alone in his fears for the future. While some of the injured veterans look forward to attending college on the G.I. Bill, others remember the way their fathers were treated after World War I and doubt that they will fare any better. When Al is notified that he and his friend, Lee Diamond, will be awarded the Navy Cross in Philadelphia, he does not want any of his old friends to see him. On the train, Lee accuses Al of cowardice and points out that he himself has faced discrimination because of anti-semitism. Despite Al's wishes, Ruth is waiting at the station, and through a ruse, takes him home without his knowing who she is. Although it is Christmas Eve, Al does not want to go inside, but the Merchants rush out to welcome him. They do their best to encourage Al to stay with them, and Ruth tells him he has been promised his old job if he takes a training course for the blind. When the Merchants leave Al alone with Ruth, however, he insists that she take him to the hospital. Ruth is furious and finally convinces Al that she loves him and wants him, whether or not he is blind. The next day, when Al is awarded his Navy Cross, Ruth and the Merchants are there to applaud. As they leave the ceremony, Al realizes that he is able to distinguish bright colors and is hopeful that he may regain some sight. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.