San Antonio (1945)

110-111 mins | Western | 29 December 1945

Director:

David Butler

Producer:

Robert Buckner

Cinematographer:

Bert Glennon

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

Ted Smith

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to a 25 Sep 1944 HR news item, actor Harry Carey was released from the film at his own request because he was dissatisfied with his role. He was to have played Errol Flynn's sidekick. Pre-production press releases included in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library state that former Olympic athelete Jim Thorpe was to play an Indian chief in the picture and Raoul Walsh was scheduled to direct it. Ted Smith and Jack McConaghy received an Oscar nomination for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration in a color film, and "Some Sunday Morning" was nominated for Best Song. ...

More Less

According to a 25 Sep 1944 HR news item, actor Harry Carey was released from the film at his own request because he was dissatisfied with his role. He was to have played Errol Flynn's sidekick. Pre-production press releases included in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library state that former Olympic athelete Jim Thorpe was to play an Indian chief in the picture and Raoul Walsh was scheduled to direct it. Ted Smith and Jack McConaghy received an Oscar nomination for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration in a color film, and "Some Sunday Morning" was nominated for Best Song.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Nov 1945
---
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1945
p. 3
Film Daily
26 Nov 1945
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1944
p. 17
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 1944
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 1944
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
23 Nov 1945
p. 12
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Dec 1944
p. 2216
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Nov 1945
pp. 2725-26
New York Times
29 Dec 1945
p. 19
Variety
21 Nov 1945
p. 10
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
S. Z. Sakall
Bill Steele
Johnny Miles
Eddie Waller
Carl Harbough
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
William Kissel
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Supv art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Hugh Friedhofer
Orch arr
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Charles David Forrest
Sd
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Matte paintings
Matte paintings
MAKEUP
Makeup
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col dir
Assoc Technicolor dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Some Sunday Morning," music by Ray Heindorf and M. K. Jerome, lyrics by Ted Koehler; "Put Your Little Foot Right Out," music and lyrics by Larry Spier; "La Varsuviana," traditional; "Somewhere in Monterey," words by Jack Scholl, music by Charles Kisco.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 December 1945
Production Date:
21 Sep--early Dec 1944
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
5 January 1946
LP9
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
110-111
Length(in feet):
9,976
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

By 1877, cattle rustling in Southwest Texas has driven away many cattle ranchers. One who has stayed behind to fight the rustlers is Charlie Bell of San Antonio. When Charlie learns that his friend, Clay Hardin, is planning to return to Texas from his hideaway in Mexico, he crosses the border to warn him that his life has been threatened by the rustlers. Clay responds that he has acquired proof against Roy Stuart, the head of the rustlers, and plans to use it to put Stuart in jail. Despite the efforts of Stuart's men, Clay safely crosses the border and rides into San Antonio in a private coach, which is also carrying singer Jeanne Starr, who has a job singing in Stuart's saloon. Clay attempts to present his evidence, a tally book that records the sale of stolen cattle, to the soldiers at a nearby garrison. In the absence of the commanding officer, however, no action can be taken, and Clay decides to hold on to the tally book for the moment. When Legare, Stuart's partner, learns about Clay's evidence, he wants to obtain the book and use it against Stuart for his own purposes. One night, Jeanne invites Clay to visit her backstage, and Charlie, worried that Jeanne may be involved in a plot against Clay, keeps the tally book. Legare witnesses the exchange, and later, when Stuart tries unsuccessfully to kill Clay, he shoots Charlie and steals the tally book. The murder is witnessed by Sacha Bozic, Jeanne's manager, who fearfully denies that he has seen anything. During the inquiry into Charlie's death, Sacha reveals nothing, ...

More Less

By 1877, cattle rustling in Southwest Texas has driven away many cattle ranchers. One who has stayed behind to fight the rustlers is Charlie Bell of San Antonio. When Charlie learns that his friend, Clay Hardin, is planning to return to Texas from his hideaway in Mexico, he crosses the border to warn him that his life has been threatened by the rustlers. Clay responds that he has acquired proof against Roy Stuart, the head of the rustlers, and plans to use it to put Stuart in jail. Despite the efforts of Stuart's men, Clay safely crosses the border and rides into San Antonio in a private coach, which is also carrying singer Jeanne Starr, who has a job singing in Stuart's saloon. Clay attempts to present his evidence, a tally book that records the sale of stolen cattle, to the soldiers at a nearby garrison. In the absence of the commanding officer, however, no action can be taken, and Clay decides to hold on to the tally book for the moment. When Legare, Stuart's partner, learns about Clay's evidence, he wants to obtain the book and use it against Stuart for his own purposes. One night, Jeanne invites Clay to visit her backstage, and Charlie, worried that Jeanne may be involved in a plot against Clay, keeps the tally book. Legare witnesses the exchange, and later, when Stuart tries unsuccessfully to kill Clay, he shoots Charlie and steals the tally book. The murder is witnessed by Sacha Bozic, Jeanne's manager, who fearfully denies that he has seen anything. During the inquiry into Charlie's death, Sacha reveals nothing, but Stuart quickly discovers that Legare committed the murder when he demands that Stuart share his cattle business with him in return for suppressing the evidence. When the cavalry leaves town, Clay is temporarily appointed to be marshal. Stuart then summons all his men to town, and this action convinces Clay that he does not have the tally book himself. Clay tells Stuart that he believes him to be innocent, but refuses to make a deal with him. Clay then arrests Legare, but when they try to leave the saloon, a gunfight ensues and Legare escapes. Stuart chases Legare into the ruins of the Alamo and kills him, and then rides out of town, pursued by Clay. Clay finally catches Stuart, who is killed during the ensuing struggle. Clay returns to San Antonio with the tally book to find that Jeanne is leaving town. He swings aboard her coach and tries to talk her into staying with him. Jeanne inadvertently reveals that she, too, is a Texan and does not protest when Clay orders the coach to return to San Antonio.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

I Love Trouble

The working title of this film was The Double Take ... >>

Citizen Kane

This film's end credits begin with the statement, “Most of the principal actors in Citizen Kane are new to motion pictures. The Mercury Theatre is proud ... >>

Star Wars

The film’s title card is preceded by the statement: “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away....” Afterward, a prologue reads: “It is a period of ... >>

They Won't Believe Me

Although a HR news item claims that Gordon McDonell's story was published in Cosmopolitan , SAB and other sources refer to the story as unpublished. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.