The Stork Club (1945)

98 mins | Musical comedy | 28 December 1945

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HISTORY

This film was B. G. DeSylva's first independent production following his relinquishing of the post of executive producer in charge of production at Paramount. A HR news item on the day production began noted that actor Noel Madison was to make his debut as a feature director with this film, but by 24 Apr 1945, he had withdrawn from the film and was replaced by Hal Walker. Madison later became a producer and director. On 13 Jul 1945, HR announced that associate producer Harold Wilson took over the final preparations for the film because B. G. DeSylva was ill. According to news items in HR , DeSylva purchased the right to use the Stork Club's name from his friend, Sherman Billingsley. More than seven hundred photographs of the Stork Club at 3 East 53rd Street in New York City were taken to guide the set designers for this film. The film marked the debut of singer Andy Russell. HR also noted that in mid-Jan 1945, Danny Kaye was considered for Betty Hutton's co-star in the film. Harry Hays Morgan, who had a bit role in the film, was formerly in the diplomatic service in Europe and was a member of the American Olympic bobsled team for two ... More Less

This film was B. G. DeSylva's first independent production following his relinquishing of the post of executive producer in charge of production at Paramount. A HR news item on the day production began noted that actor Noel Madison was to make his debut as a feature director with this film, but by 24 Apr 1945, he had withdrawn from the film and was replaced by Hal Walker. Madison later became a producer and director. On 13 Jul 1945, HR announced that associate producer Harold Wilson took over the final preparations for the film because B. G. DeSylva was ill. According to news items in HR , DeSylva purchased the right to use the Stork Club's name from his friend, Sherman Billingsley. More than seven hundred photographs of the Stork Club at 3 East 53rd Street in New York City were taken to guide the set designers for this film. The film marked the debut of singer Andy Russell. HR also noted that in mid-Jan 1945, Danny Kaye was considered for Betty Hutton's co-star in the film. Harry Hays Morgan, who had a bit role in the film, was formerly in the diplomatic service in Europe and was a member of the American Olympic bobsled team for two years. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Oct 1945.
---
Daily Variety
5 Oct 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Oct 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 45
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 45
7
Hollywood Reporter
24 Apr 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 45
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Dec 45
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Jul 45
p. 2555.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Oct 45
p. 2679.
New York Times
20 Dec 45
p. 18.
Variety
10 Oct 45
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And introducing
Marie Icide
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Vocal arr
Mus assoc
VISUAL EFFECTS
Asst process photog
Asst process photog
Spec photog eff
Asst spec photog eff
DANCE
Musical numbers staged by
Dance supv
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
SOURCES
SONGS
"In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree," music and lyrics by Egbert Van Alstyne and Harry Williams
"Love Me," music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Sammy Cahn
"Doctor, Lawyer, Indian Chief," music by Hoagy Carmichael, lyrics by Paul Francis Webster
+
SONGS
"In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree," music and lyrics by Egbert Van Alstyne and Harry Williams
"Love Me," music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Sammy Cahn
"Doctor, Lawyer, Indian Chief," music by Hoagy Carmichael, lyrics by Paul Francis Webster
"If I Had a Dozen Hearts," music and lyrics by Paul Francis Webster and Harry Revel
"I'm a Square in the Social Circle," music and lyrics by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 December 1945
Production Date:
16 April--9 June 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 December 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13709
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
98
Length(in feet):
8,814
Country:
United States
PCA No:
10845
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Wealthy Irishman J. B. Bates, whose wife of forty years left him six months previously because of his parsimony, stumbles off a pier and is saved by Judy Peabody, a hat check girl at Manhattan's famous Stork Club. Bates's near-drowning causes him to ponder his miserly ways, and he instructs his lawyer, Tom Curtis, to send Judy a letter informing her that accounts have been opened for her at a bank, a hotel, and a department store because she has been "most accommodating" to her benefactor, who wishes to remain anonymous. Wearing shabby clothes, Bates arrives at the Stork Club to see Judy receive the letter, and Judy, believing he is a vagabond, gets him a job as a busboy. Bates quits within minutes, and Judy, who calls him "Pop," takes him in. Judy, meanwhile, suspects that her benefactor is her boss, Sherman Billingsley, a "wolf" with ulterior motives. Judy's bandleader boyfriend, Danny Wilton, returns unexpectedly from a stint in the Marines and assumes that Judy is a kept woman. When Judy confronts Billingsley, he merely escorts her out of his office, and Danny, who hoped to get an audition with Billingsley, sees him with his arm around Judy. Determined to help Danny, Judy tells his band to stay with her at her hotel, the Yorke Towers. She then buys them all new clothes in an effort to bankrupt her benefactor for ruining her love affair. To stop Judy from spending any more of his money, Bates confesses that he is the benefactor, but she does not believe him. Judy then calls Curtis, but he refuses to confirm Bates's story. Meanwhile, Judy rehearses with the band ... +


Wealthy Irishman J. B. Bates, whose wife of forty years left him six months previously because of his parsimony, stumbles off a pier and is saved by Judy Peabody, a hat check girl at Manhattan's famous Stork Club. Bates's near-drowning causes him to ponder his miserly ways, and he instructs his lawyer, Tom Curtis, to send Judy a letter informing her that accounts have been opened for her at a bank, a hotel, and a department store because she has been "most accommodating" to her benefactor, who wishes to remain anonymous. Wearing shabby clothes, Bates arrives at the Stork Club to see Judy receive the letter, and Judy, believing he is a vagabond, gets him a job as a busboy. Bates quits within minutes, and Judy, who calls him "Pop," takes him in. Judy, meanwhile, suspects that her benefactor is her boss, Sherman Billingsley, a "wolf" with ulterior motives. Judy's bandleader boyfriend, Danny Wilton, returns unexpectedly from a stint in the Marines and assumes that Judy is a kept woman. When Judy confronts Billingsley, he merely escorts her out of his office, and Danny, who hoped to get an audition with Billingsley, sees him with his arm around Judy. Determined to help Danny, Judy tells his band to stay with her at her hotel, the Yorke Towers. She then buys them all new clothes in an effort to bankrupt her benefactor for ruining her love affair. To stop Judy from spending any more of his money, Bates confesses that he is the benefactor, but she does not believe him. Judy then calls Curtis, but he refuses to confirm Bates's story. Meanwhile, Judy rehearses with the band and gets them a job with Billingsley by posing as gossip columnist Walter Winchell. When Bates's estranged wife Edith arrives at the Yorke Towers, Judy assures her that she is not "Pop's" mistress and that "Pop" loves his wife. Edith then informs Judy that "Pop" is rich, and Judy, finally realizing he is her benefactor, schemes with Edith to get their men back during the band's debut at the Stork Club that night. When the band plays Edith and Bates's song, they are reconciled. Curtis then assures Danny that "Pop" was Judy's benefactor, and Judy sings with the band. Bates and Edith then give Danny and Judy a million dollars for a wedding present. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.