Chip Off the Old Block (1944)

76-77 mins | Musical comedy | 25 February 1944

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Third Glory. HR news items and production charts include Walter Catlett in the cast, but he did not appear in the film. According to the Var review, actor Donald O'Connor was inducted into the U.S. Army the same week this film was released. This marked the film debut of sixteen-year-old actress Ann Blyth, who had previously appeared on Broadway in the play Watch on the Rhine. ...

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The working title of this film was The Third Glory. HR news items and production charts include Walter Catlett in the cast, but he did not appear in the film. According to the Var review, actor Donald O'Connor was inducted into the U.S. Army the same week this film was released. This marked the film debut of sixteen-year-old actress Ann Blyth, who had previously appeared on Broadway in the play Watch on the Rhine.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Feb 1944
---
Daily Variety
11 Feb 1944
p. 3
Film Daily
14 Feb 1944
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 1943
p. 23
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 1943
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 1943
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1944
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Jan 1944
p. 1715
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Feb 1944
p. 1761
New York Times
17 Mar 1944
p. 14
Variety
16 Feb 1944
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Mack Wright
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
John B. Goodman
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
R. A. Gausman
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Dir of sd
[Sd] tech
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"My Song," words and music by Lew Brown and Ray Henderson; "Love Is Like Music," music by Milton Schwarzwald, lyrics by Sidney Miller and Inez James; "Is It Good or Is It Bad?" words and music by Charles Tobias; "It's Mighty Nice to Have Met You" and "Spelling Prep," words by William Crago, music by Grace Shannon; "Gotta Give My Feet a Break" and "The Captain's Kids," words and music by Sidney Miller and Inez James; "Sailor Song," music by Sidney Miller and Inez James, lyrics by Eugene Conrad.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Third Glory
Release Date:
25 February 1944
Production Date:
30 Aug--early Oct 1943
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
10 March 1944
LP12600
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76-77
Length(in feet):
7,144
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9803
SYNOPSIS

After writing, directing and starring in the annual musical show at the Sperling Naval Academy, cadet Donald Corrigan is brought before Dean Manning for his many shenanigans. Rather than expelling the teenager, Manning sends Donald home on an extended leave, stating that he may return once he corrects his behavior. Donald meets Glory Marlow III on the train to New York City and becomes immediately smitten. Glory III, who was reared in Hawaii by her aunt and uncle, tells Donald that she is going to New York to live with her mother and grandmother, two famous actresses of the musical theater. Unknown to Glory III, however, is the fact that her mother has just announced her retirement. When her producers, Blaney Wright and Henry McHugh, suggest that Glory III take her place in their new production, Glory, Jr. refuses, as she is intent on keeping her daughter out of the theater. Upon arriving in New York, Donald is met at the train station by love-struck Peggy Flaherty, who causes the jealous Glory III to break her date with Donald. When Glory III tells her mother and grandmother what happened, they tell her about the "Corrigan curse," as they too had fallen in love, then lost, both Donald's father and grandfather. Donald still calls on Glory III that night, but she, bowing to two generations of advice, refuses to see him. The next day, Donald meets with Peggy, and she agrees to square things with Glory III if he agrees to help her audition for some Broadway plays. Glory, however, having ordered Quentin, her butler, to tell Glory III that Donald has left town, impersonates ...

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After writing, directing and starring in the annual musical show at the Sperling Naval Academy, cadet Donald Corrigan is brought before Dean Manning for his many shenanigans. Rather than expelling the teenager, Manning sends Donald home on an extended leave, stating that he may return once he corrects his behavior. Donald meets Glory Marlow III on the train to New York City and becomes immediately smitten. Glory III, who was reared in Hawaii by her aunt and uncle, tells Donald that she is going to New York to live with her mother and grandmother, two famous actresses of the musical theater. Unknown to Glory III, however, is the fact that her mother has just announced her retirement. When her producers, Blaney Wright and Henry McHugh, suggest that Glory III take her place in their new production, Glory, Jr. refuses, as she is intent on keeping her daughter out of the theater. Upon arriving in New York, Donald is met at the train station by love-struck Peggy Flaherty, who causes the jealous Glory III to break her date with Donald. When Glory III tells her mother and grandmother what happened, they tell her about the "Corrigan curse," as they too had fallen in love, then lost, both Donald's father and grandfather. Donald still calls on Glory III that night, but she, bowing to two generations of advice, refuses to see him. The next day, Donald meets with Peggy, and she agrees to square things with Glory III if he agrees to help her audition for some Broadway plays. Glory, however, having ordered Quentin, her butler, to tell Glory III that Donald has left town, impersonates her granddaughter on the phone and tells Donald that Glory III is engaged. The two teenagers, though, run into each other on the streets of New York, and learn about her grandmother's deception. Glory III then invites Donald and Peggy to her recital that night, much to her mother and grandmother's chagrin. Peggy uses the recital as an opportunity to audition for the theatrical producers in attendance, but Blaney and Henry leave before she and Donald perform their number. Glory III is later offered the lead in the producers' new play, but she refuses, stating that she plans to spend her time working for Chinese war relief and other charities. Donald convinces her to do the play, however, on the condition that all profits be donated to those same charities. Later, Donald's father, Commander Judd Corrigan, returns home, and while eavesdropping on him, Donald and Peggy mistakenly assume that he is a German spy when they hear him discussing plans for Donald's birthday present. After learning that Donald is dating Glory III, Judd goes with his son to Glory III's rehearsal, where he tells Glory, Jr. that he is still in love with her. That night, Donald and Peggy unsuccessfully attempt to steal Judd's blueprints from Scheffer, a German-American sailboat builder. Judd then orders Donald to return to Sperling. Just as her show, The Third Glory , is about to open on Broadway, Glory III insists that they perform their final rehearsal at the Academy. Aware that his father is meeting with Scheffer at a nearby boat house, Donald and his cadet friends abduct the boat builder, only to discover that the "spy plans" are the blueprints to Donald's birthday present. Peggy then connives to get Donald to appear with her in the final rehearsal, but he still ends up in the arms of Glory III when they walk offstage together.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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