Crack-Up (1946)

93 mins | Drama | 6 September 1946

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HISTORY

According to HR news items, scenes for this film were shot at the Los Angeles harbor. Pat O'Brien reprised his role in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 30 Dec 1946, co-starring Lynn Bari. In May 2002, RKO Pictures announced plans to make a new adaptation of Fredric Brown's short story, with a script to be written by Chris Kletzien; however, by Jun 2005, the film had not gone into ... More Less

According to HR news items, scenes for this film were shot at the Los Angeles harbor. Pat O'Brien reprised his role in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 30 Dec 1946, co-starring Lynn Bari. In May 2002, RKO Pictures announced plans to make a new adaptation of Fredric Brown's short story, with a script to be written by Chris Kletzien; however, by Jun 2005, the film had not gone into production. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Jun 1946.
---
Daily Variety
13 Jun 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Jun 46
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Dec 45
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 46
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 46
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Apr 46
p. 2951.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Jun 46
pp. 3054-55.
New York Times
7 Sep 46
p. 11.
Variety
19 Jun 46
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Matte paintings
Optical effects
Transparency projection shots and miniatures
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Madman's Holiday" by Fredric Brown in Detective Story (Jul 1943).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 September 1946
Production Date:
mid December 1945--late February 1946
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
19 June 1946
Copyright Number:
LP434
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
93
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11384
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After a delirious George Steele breaks a window at the Manhattan Museum and struggles wildly with a policeman, the museum's board, led by Dr. Lowell, expresses concern over his mental state. While recuperating at Dr. Lowell's house, George, an art expert and lecturer recently released from military service, tells police lieutenant Cochrane that he was involved in a train wreck that night. When the suspicious Cochrane informs George that no train wrecks have been reported, Dr. Lowell asks George to recall everything he can about the incident, and George relates the following story: After one of his explosive public lectures, George is reprimanded by museum director Barton, who feels that George's lectures are too inflammatory. Barton also complains about George's promise to X-ray a famous painting to demonstrate how art forgeries are detected. While an annoyed George then has a drink with Terry Cordell, his girl friend, he receives a telephone call summoning him to an out-of-town hospital to which his mother has supposedly been taken. On the train to the hospital, George becomes engrossed in watching another train approaching on the opposite track, and as if by pre-design, his train collides with the other. Back at Dr. Lowell's, George concludes his story, saying that after the crash, he found himself at the museum. Traybin, an English art expert, confers secretly with Cochrane and asks him to have George tailed. George is then fired by Barton and discovers that his apartment has been torn apart. When George confesses to Terry that he is worried that he is suffering from post-war stress, she tries to persuade him to forget that night. ... +


After a delirious George Steele breaks a window at the Manhattan Museum and struggles wildly with a policeman, the museum's board, led by Dr. Lowell, expresses concern over his mental state. While recuperating at Dr. Lowell's house, George, an art expert and lecturer recently released from military service, tells police lieutenant Cochrane that he was involved in a train wreck that night. When the suspicious Cochrane informs George that no train wrecks have been reported, Dr. Lowell asks George to recall everything he can about the incident, and George relates the following story: After one of his explosive public lectures, George is reprimanded by museum director Barton, who feels that George's lectures are too inflammatory. Barton also complains about George's promise to X-ray a famous painting to demonstrate how art forgeries are detected. While an annoyed George then has a drink with Terry Cordell, his girl friend, he receives a telephone call summoning him to an out-of-town hospital to which his mother has supposedly been taken. On the train to the hospital, George becomes engrossed in watching another train approaching on the opposite track, and as if by pre-design, his train collides with the other. Back at Dr. Lowell's, George concludes his story, saying that after the crash, he found himself at the museum. Traybin, an English art expert, confers secretly with Cochrane and asks him to have George tailed. George is then fired by Barton and discovers that his apartment has been torn apart. When George confesses to Terry that he is worried that he is suffering from post-war stress, she tries to persuade him to forget that night. George, however, is determined to discover the truth, and sets about reconstructing events leading up to the crash. When no one on the commuter train remembers him from the night before, George gets off at the first stop and questions the station clerk, who recalls that two men got off the train with a drunk. Having seen only one man helping a drunk board in New York, George concludes that he was the "drunk" at the station and rushes back to the museum to tell friend and employee Stevenson about his discovery. Stevenson tells George that Barton has received information that a Thomas Gainsborough painting that had been reported lost at sea, was, in fact, a fake. Sure that another forgery is at the museum, George decides to enlist Stevenson's help after hours to sneak into the building's vault. That night, George arrives at the museum, finds Stevenson dead and is pursued by the police. Although Terry and Traybin advise George to turn himself in to Cochrane, the now fugitive George refuses. Instead, George interrogates Barton, who was at the museum when Stevenson was killed, and Barton confesses that a museum painting by Gustave Doré, which is due to be shipped overseas, is most likely a forgery. George then overhears Traybin furtively discussing the imminent departure of the painting and races to the pier from which it is to be shipped. After sneaking on board the ship, George finds the Doré in the cargo hold just as a fire is set. The arsonist then locks George in the hold, but George is rescued by Traybin and Cochrane. Aided by Terry, George once again escapes from the police and asks Barton's young secretary, Mary, to help him locate an X-ray machine. George examines the Doré and confirms that it is indeed a fake, but is then knocked out by gun-wielding Mary, who takes him and Terry to her real boss, Dr. Lowell. After Lowell confesses to George that he stole the paintings and used a mind-altering drug on him to prevent him from X-raying the Doré, he drugs George again to discover whether he has told anyone beside Terry about his findings. Although George reveals that he was unable to contact Cochrane, he and Terry are saved by the lieutenant and Traybin, who burst in and shoot Lowell. Terry then identifies Traybin as a Scotland Yard detective, and Cochrane convinces a frightened Mary to reveal the paintings' whereabouts. Cleared of all guilt, George happily embraces Terry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.