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HISTORY

       Jean Gillie, an English actress, was married to director Jack Bernhard. This film marked her U.S. motion picture debut. In the opening titles, between the producers' and director's cards, she is seen in a mid-closeup with the lower-third super "Introducing Miss Jean Gillie." According to a 14 Nov 1946 HR article, the film's advertising campaign drew unfavorable attention from the advertising code administration of the MPAA. The MPAA objected to the words "She's an Outlaw," because Howard Hughes had already been prohibited from using a similar ad campaign for his 1943 release The Outlaw (see entry). The MPAA also rejected an ad that showed a picture of Gillie seated on a bed, with one leg exposed above the knee, a cigarette in one hand and a gun in the other. Monogram executives claimed that the image had been submitted for approval before its use, but the MPAA countered that the bared leg and the gun had been added later. Monogram agreed to discontinue the campaign.
       in the original printed entry for this film, Ruth Allen was credited with the role of "Ruth," but this is not correct. The role was played by Rosemary Bertrand. Ruth Allen's participation, if any, in this film has not been determined.
       Prints of the film currently available have a running time of 75-76 ... More Less

       Jean Gillie, an English actress, was married to director Jack Bernhard. This film marked her U.S. motion picture debut. In the opening titles, between the producers' and director's cards, she is seen in a mid-closeup with the lower-third super "Introducing Miss Jean Gillie." According to a 14 Nov 1946 HR article, the film's advertising campaign drew unfavorable attention from the advertising code administration of the MPAA. The MPAA objected to the words "She's an Outlaw," because Howard Hughes had already been prohibited from using a similar ad campaign for his 1943 release The Outlaw (see entry). The MPAA also rejected an ad that showed a picture of Gillie seated on a bed, with one leg exposed above the knee, a cigarette in one hand and a gun in the other. Monogram executives claimed that the image had been submitted for approval before its use, but the MPAA countered that the bared leg and the gun had been added later. Monogram agreed to discontinue the campaign.
       in the original printed entry for this film, Ruth Allen was credited with the role of "Ruth," but this is not correct. The role was played by Rosemary Bertrand. Ruth Allen's participation, if any, in this film has not been determined.
       Prints of the film currently available have a running time of 75-76 minutes. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Sep 1946.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Sep 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
10 May 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 46
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Jun 46
p. 3031.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Sep 46
p. 3198.
New York Times
2 Nov 46
p. 12.
Variety
6 Nov 46
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Bernhard-Brandt Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
ART DIRECTOR
Set des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dresser
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Recorded by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec opt eff
Transparency projection shots
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
[as M. Morante]
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 September 1946
Production Date:
early May--mid May 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 September 1946
Copyright Number:
LP546
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70 or 76-77
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
11768
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Suffering from a fatal gunshot wound, Dr. Lloyd Craig struggles to Margot Shelby's apartment and shoots her before dying himself. While she is dying, Margot recounts for police detective Joe Portugal the events that led to her shooting: After Margot's boyfriend, Frankie Olins, hides the $400,000 he stole in a bank robbery, he is arrested. Because a guard was killed during the robbery, Olins is sentenced to die in the gas chamber. Margot pretends love for gangster Jim Vincent and promises to share the stolen money with him if he helps remove Olins' body from the gas chamber immediately after the execution. She then seduces Craig, the prison doctor, and persuades him to bring Olins back to life by administering an antidote for cyanide gas poisoning. When Olins is revived, he gives Margot half of a map showing the location of the stolen money and keeps the other half for himself. Later, encouraged by Margot, a jealous Vincent shoots Olins and takes his half of the map. Because his doctor's license plates will enable them to pass through the police roadblocks, Margot and Vincent force Craig to drive them to the hiding place. Vincent plans to kill Craig, but before he can do so, Margot, who wants all the money for herself, tricks him into fixing a flat tire and runs him over with the car. She then forces Craig to dig up the treasure, and after he does, shoots him. Having finished her story, Margot dies. Portugal then opens the box and finds only a single dollar bill inside, along with a note from Olins stating that he did not ... +


Suffering from a fatal gunshot wound, Dr. Lloyd Craig struggles to Margot Shelby's apartment and shoots her before dying himself. While she is dying, Margot recounts for police detective Joe Portugal the events that led to her shooting: After Margot's boyfriend, Frankie Olins, hides the $400,000 he stole in a bank robbery, he is arrested. Because a guard was killed during the robbery, Olins is sentenced to die in the gas chamber. Margot pretends love for gangster Jim Vincent and promises to share the stolen money with him if he helps remove Olins' body from the gas chamber immediately after the execution. She then seduces Craig, the prison doctor, and persuades him to bring Olins back to life by administering an antidote for cyanide gas poisoning. When Olins is revived, he gives Margot half of a map showing the location of the stolen money and keeps the other half for himself. Later, encouraged by Margot, a jealous Vincent shoots Olins and takes his half of the map. Because his doctor's license plates will enable them to pass through the police roadblocks, Margot and Vincent force Craig to drive them to the hiding place. Vincent plans to kill Craig, but before he can do so, Margot, who wants all the money for herself, tricks him into fixing a flat tire and runs him over with the car. She then forces Craig to dig up the treasure, and after he does, shoots him. Having finished her story, Margot dies. Portugal then opens the box and finds only a single dollar bill inside, along with a note from Olins stating that he did not intend to leave any money to a double-crosser. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.