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HISTORY

The 1 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that photography was completed at Universal City, CA, on The Acquittal, and that production had moved to the cutting room. The film's big courtroom scene employed several hundred people. The art director used photographs of actual courtroom trials to design the set.
       The film had its New York premiere at the Cameo Theatre, according to the 29 Dec 1923 Exhibitors Herald.
       A review in the 1-15 Nov 1923 Screen Opinion noted that star Claire Windsor was on loan to Universal Pictures from Samuel Goldwyn.
       Company records credit the individuals named with continuity. ...

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The 1 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that photography was completed at Universal City, CA, on The Acquittal, and that production had moved to the cutting room. The film's big courtroom scene employed several hundred people. The art director used photographs of actual courtroom trials to design the set.
       The film had its New York premiere at the Cameo Theatre, according to the 29 Dec 1923 Exhibitors Herald.
       A review in the 1-15 Nov 1923 Screen Opinion noted that star Claire Windsor was on loan to Universal Pictures from Samuel Goldwyn.
       Company records credit the individuals named with continuity.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
29 Dec 1923
p. 148
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Sep 1923
p. 598
Screen Opinions
1-15 Nov 1923
p. 61
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 November 1923
Production Date:
ended late Aug 1923
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures
13 October 1923
LP19548
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,523
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Kenneth Winthrop is on the verge of being convicted of murdering his foster father, Andrew Prentice, when his wife enters the courtroom with new evidence. What was presented as twelve o'clock on a butcher shop clock, she explains, was misinterpreted, because the clock was actually a butcher's scale whose hands remain straight up when not in use. Kenneth is acquitted, but later, a letter is brought to Prentice's second adopted son, Robert Armstrong, which had been delayed because of a mail robbery. The letter reveals that Prentice was poisoned by his fiancee and secretary, Edith Craig, who had been carrying on an affair with Kenneth. ...

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Kenneth Winthrop is on the verge of being convicted of murdering his foster father, Andrew Prentice, when his wife enters the courtroom with new evidence. What was presented as twelve o'clock on a butcher shop clock, she explains, was misinterpreted, because the clock was actually a butcher's scale whose hands remain straight up when not in use. Kenneth is acquitted, but later, a letter is brought to Prentice's second adopted son, Robert Armstrong, which had been delayed because of a mail robbery. The letter reveals that Prentice was poisoned by his fiancee and secretary, Edith Craig, who had been carrying on an affair with Kenneth.

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GENRE
Genres:


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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Patricide, Adoption
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.