Live Wires (1946)

64-65 mins | Comedy | 12 January 1946

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HISTORY

The film's working title was Stepping Around. The original story was actually written by noted writer Dore Schary, who took the name of his then-infant son Jeb as his pseudonym for this film. Schary's story was also used as the basis for the 1943 Monogram picture Here Comes Kelly (see entry). The title card reads: "Leo Gorcey and The Bowery Boys in Live Wires." Gorcey, Huntz Hall and Bobby Jordan originally appeared together as "The Dead End Kids" in the 1938 Warner Bros. film Crime School (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1931-40; F3.0873). After making several films as "The Dead End Kids," these actors, together with various others, continued their characterizations as working class New York youths first in Universal's "The Little Tough Guys" series, then in Monogram's "The East Side Kids" and "The Bowery Boys" series.
       Live Wires was the first entry in the popular "The Bowery Boys" series, which lasted until 1958 and included forty-eight films. Gorcey played gang leader "Slip Mahoney," while Hall played his dimwitted sidekick, "Sach Jones." Jordan dropped out of the series in 1947, and Gorcey left in 1956, after his father Bernard, who appeared in most of the films as "Louie," the proprietor of the gang's soda fountain hangout, died. Jan Grippo produced the series and William Beaudine directed many of the pictures. The last entry in the series was In the Money, which was released by Allied Artists in 1958. For more information on "The Dead End Kids," "The Little Tough Guys," "The East Side Kids" and "The Bowery Boys" series, ...

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The film's working title was Stepping Around. The original story was actually written by noted writer Dore Schary, who took the name of his then-infant son Jeb as his pseudonym for this film. Schary's story was also used as the basis for the 1943 Monogram picture Here Comes Kelly (see entry). The title card reads: "Leo Gorcey and The Bowery Boys in Live Wires." Gorcey, Huntz Hall and Bobby Jordan originally appeared together as "The Dead End Kids" in the 1938 Warner Bros. film Crime School (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1931-40; F3.0873). After making several films as "The Dead End Kids," these actors, together with various others, continued their characterizations as working class New York youths first in Universal's "The Little Tough Guys" series, then in Monogram's "The East Side Kids" and "The Bowery Boys" series.
       Live Wires was the first entry in the popular "The Bowery Boys" series, which lasted until 1958 and included forty-eight films. Gorcey played gang leader "Slip Mahoney," while Hall played his dimwitted sidekick, "Sach Jones." Jordan dropped out of the series in 1947, and Gorcey left in 1956, after his father Bernard, who appeared in most of the films as "Louie," the proprietor of the gang's soda fountain hangout, died. Jan Grippo produced the series and William Beaudine directed many of the pictures. The last entry in the series was In the Money, which was released by Allied Artists in 1958. For more information on "The Dead End Kids," "The Little Tough Guys," "The East Side Kids" and "The Bowery Boys" series, see the entry for Crime School and Little Tough Guy in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.0873 and F3.2534 and consult the Series Index.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Feb 1946
---
Daily Variety
8 Feb 1946
p. 3
Film Daily
18 Feb 1946
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 1945
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1945
p. 20
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 1946
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Feb 1946
p. 2849
Variety
13 Feb 1946
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jan Grippo Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Doc Joos
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITERS
Scr
Jeb Schary
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
2d cam
ART DIRECTOR
Dave Milton
Tech dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
MUSIC
Edward Kay
Mus dir
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec opt eff
Transparency projection shots
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Stepping Around
Release Date:
12 January 1946
Production Date:
late Sep--early Oct 1945
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Monogram Pictures Corp.
12 January 1946
LP19
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64-65
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Because of his quick temper, New Yorker Slip Mahoney loses job after job, exasperating his sister Mary. After he is fired from a flower delivery job, Slip and his friends, Sach Jones, Bobby, Homer and Whitey, watch a salesman selling stain remover on the streets, and Slip, thinking that this is an easy way to make money, asks the salesman to cut him in on the business. At first, the salesman refuses, but when he learns that the police are on the way to arrest him, he agrees to sell the remaining bottles to the boys for ten dollars. Slip then prepares to demonstrate the remover by spilling ink on the jacket of a passerby, and when he is unable to remove the stain, picks a fight with the man. Slip is trounced, but Sach manages to win back their money by placing bets on Slip's opponent, whom he has recognized as a former lightweight champion. The following day, Slip applies for a job with Herbert Sayers, Mary's boss. Although Slip is sure that he will be hired in a managerial position, he is ordered to begin work at the bottom, shoveling dirt on a construction site. Once again, however, he gets in a fight and loses the job. In a last attempt to hold down a job, Slip joins Sach, who is working as a "skip tracer," repossessing goods from people who are behind on their payments. His first assignment is to take back a car from a singer named Jeanette, who works at the High Hat Club. At the club, Jeanette offers to get Slip a different job with her friends if he ...

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Because of his quick temper, New Yorker Slip Mahoney loses job after job, exasperating his sister Mary. After he is fired from a flower delivery job, Slip and his friends, Sach Jones, Bobby, Homer and Whitey, watch a salesman selling stain remover on the streets, and Slip, thinking that this is an easy way to make money, asks the salesman to cut him in on the business. At first, the salesman refuses, but when he learns that the police are on the way to arrest him, he agrees to sell the remaining bottles to the boys for ten dollars. Slip then prepares to demonstrate the remover by spilling ink on the jacket of a passerby, and when he is unable to remove the stain, picks a fight with the man. Slip is trounced, but Sach manages to win back their money by placing bets on Slip's opponent, whom he has recognized as a former lightweight champion. The following day, Slip applies for a job with Herbert Sayers, Mary's boss. Although Slip is sure that he will be hired in a managerial position, he is ordered to begin work at the bottom, shoveling dirt on a construction site. Once again, however, he gets in a fight and loses the job. In a last attempt to hold down a job, Slip joins Sach, who is working as a "skip tracer," repossessing goods from people who are behind on their payments. His first assignment is to take back a car from a singer named Jeanette, who works at the High Hat Club. At the club, Jeanette offers to get Slip a different job with her friends if he agrees to overlook her debt. When he arrives at her apartment to meet her friends, he sees a photograph of Sayers, Mary's boss, on a table. Jeanette claims that she and Sayers are no longer involved, but Slip is skeptical. Jeanette does not really intend to find Slip a job, but plots to have him killed. While they are driving to a meeting with the men who will commit the crime, however, Slip manages to repossess her car. Slip is so successful at his job that his boss, Barton, asks him and Sach to serve summons on Patsy Clark and Pigeon, who are being charged with running an auto theft ring. Meanwhile, Sayers asks Mary to come to Mexico with him on business. Assuming that Patsy is a woman, Slip confidently sets off to deliver the summons. To his surprise, Patsy turns out to be an enormous man, who has no intention of allowing Slip to take advantage of him. Posing as an employee of Patsy's out-of-town gangster pal, Slip waits for an opportunity either to escape or serve the summons. While he is with Patsy, Slip learns that Pigeon is actually Sayers and is going to Mexico in order to avoid arrest. Eventually, Sach and the boys come to Slip's rescue, and the ensuing ruckus attracts the police, who arrest Patsy. Slip and the boys then hurry to the airport to stop Sayers from leaving the country. Mary is so proud of her brother that she punches Jeanette, who is boarding the plane, when she makes a disparaging comment about him. Slip is delighted and pronounces his sister "a real Mahoney."

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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