My Reputation (1946)

93 mins | Melodrama | 26 January 1946

Director:

Curtis Bernhardt

Producer:

Henry Blanke

Cinematographer:

James Wong Howe

Editor:

David Weisbart

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film begins with a quotation from the William Shakespeare play Othello: "Who steals my purse steals trash...but he that filches from me my good name robs me of that which not enriches him, and makes me poor indeed." HR news items add the following information about the production: Edith Head was borrowed from Paramount to design Barbara Stanwyck's costumes. The production closed down for a week in Dec 1943 and for another week in Jan 1944 due to Stanwyck's illness with the flu. This was George Brent's final film for Warner Bros. Barbara Stanwyck and George Brent reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 21 Apr 1947. ...

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The film begins with a quotation from the William Shakespeare play Othello: "Who steals my purse steals trash...but he that filches from me my good name robs me of that which not enriches him, and makes me poor indeed." HR news items add the following information about the production: Edith Head was borrowed from Paramount to design Barbara Stanwyck's costumes. The production closed down for a week in Dec 1943 and for another week in Jan 1944 due to Stanwyck's illness with the flu. This was George Brent's final film for Warner Bros. Barbara Stanwyck and George Brent reprised their roles in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on 21 Apr 1947.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 Jan 1946
---
Daily Variety
8 Jan 1946
p. 3, 10
Film Daily
10 Jan 1946
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1943
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1943
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 1944
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 1944
p. 15
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 1946
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Jan 1946
p. 2792
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Jan 1946
p. 2793
New York Times
26 Jan 1946
p. 19
Variety
9 Jan 1946
p. 79
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Barbara Stanwyck's gowns by
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Instruct My Sorrows by Clare Jaynes (New York, 1942).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 January 1946
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 Jan 1946
Production Date:
mid Nov 1943--late Jan 1944
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
26 January 1946
LP85
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
93
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9770
SYNOPSIS

After her husband Paul dies in 1942, Lake Forest, Illinois society woman Jessica Drummond is left alone to rear her two sons, Kim and Keith. Family friend Frank Everett advises Jess that although Paul set up a trust fund for their sons' education, her income will be reduced. As Frank is leaving, Jess's mother, Mrs. Kimball, arrives. When Jess announces that she doesn't intend to wear mourning, her mother warns her that people of their class must wear it. She, herself, has worn black since the death of Jess's father twenty-five years earlier. Jess has been left on her own for an evening when the boys are invited to a party the night before they are to leave for boarding school. Jess meets her friend, Ginna Abbott, for lunch and frets about living alone. Later they are joined by George Van Ormand, the husband of another friend, who offers to drive Jess home. When he attempts to kiss her, Jess rebuffs him, and hurriedly leaves to spend the night with Ginna. Ginna advises Jess to be herself for a change and invites her to join her and her husband Cary on a ski trip to California. On the slopes Jess meets Major Scott Landis, who quickly becomes attracted to her. Still distraught over Paul's death, however, Jess sends him away and returns home to Lake Forest. With the boys away, Jess becomes lonely, and when Frank drops in, she invites him for dinner. While they are eating, Ginna telephones to tell Jess that Scott is in town and suggests that she and Frank join them at the club. ...

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After her husband Paul dies in 1942, Lake Forest, Illinois society woman Jessica Drummond is left alone to rear her two sons, Kim and Keith. Family friend Frank Everett advises Jess that although Paul set up a trust fund for their sons' education, her income will be reduced. As Frank is leaving, Jess's mother, Mrs. Kimball, arrives. When Jess announces that she doesn't intend to wear mourning, her mother warns her that people of their class must wear it. She, herself, has worn black since the death of Jess's father twenty-five years earlier. Jess has been left on her own for an evening when the boys are invited to a party the night before they are to leave for boarding school. Jess meets her friend, Ginna Abbott, for lunch and frets about living alone. Later they are joined by George Van Ormand, the husband of another friend, who offers to drive Jess home. When he attempts to kiss her, Jess rebuffs him, and hurriedly leaves to spend the night with Ginna. Ginna advises Jess to be herself for a change and invites her to join her and her husband Cary on a ski trip to California. On the slopes Jess meets Major Scott Landis, who quickly becomes attracted to her. Still distraught over Paul's death, however, Jess sends him away and returns home to Lake Forest. With the boys away, Jess becomes lonely, and when Frank drops in, she invites him for dinner. While they are eating, Ginna telephones to tell Jess that Scott is in town and suggests that she and Frank join them at the club. Scott, who is at the club with an old girl friend, tells Jess that he is now stationed in the area and invites her out. She meets him at his apartment and is seen by a friend of her mother. After hearing gossip about Jess, Mrs. Kimball lectures her daughter about the importance of maintaining her reputation. Jess refuses to be browbeaten, however, and invites Scott to her home for Christmas Eve. At that time, Mrs. Kimball, who dislikes Scott, calls him "a scalawag in league with the devil." Scott responds that he never wanted to get married and recommends that Jess marry Frank. Later, at a New Year's Eve party, Scott tells Jess he has been ordered overseas, and Jess decides to go to New York with him until he leaves. When she announces her trip to her sons, who have heard gossip about Jess and Scott, they run away to their grandmother. The boys accuse Jess of lying to them and of having forgotten their father. Although she explains that she was very lonely after Paul's death, their distress causes her to forgo her plans, and she says goodbye to Scott in Chicago. He then promises to return.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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