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HISTORY

Songwriter Cole Porter was born into a wealthy family in Peru, IN on 9 Jun 1891. He was educated at Yale University and studied law at Harvard. In 1916, his first musical comedy, See America First , failed after fifteen performances. In 1919, he married Linda Lee Thomas, a wealthy, socially prominent divorcee, eight years older than he. Biographies have indicated that Porter, a secret homosexual, and his wife lived separate lives for much of their marriage. Porter wrote many successful shows including Fifty Million Frenchmen , Wake Up and Dream , Anything Goes , DuBarry Was a Lady and Silk Stockings , as well as film scores. Contrary to the film's story, Monty Woolley was not a professor of Porter's, but a fellow student, and Porter was never wounded in World War I, although he did have a serious horseback riding accident in the mid-1930s which eventually resulted in the amputation of one leg in 1956. The film's credits state that it was "based on the career of Cole Porter." The chronology of Porter's songs and musical plays was altered for the film. Modern sources speculate that the character of "Carol Hall" was based on Ethel Merman. Mary Martin first attracted attention for her singing of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" in Porter's musical Leave It To Me , and the song became her signature. Night and Day marked Martin's last major film appearance, although she did appear as herself in the 1953 M-G-M release Main Street to Broadway .
       Hal B. Wallis was slated to produce the picture, but ... More Less

Songwriter Cole Porter was born into a wealthy family in Peru, IN on 9 Jun 1891. He was educated at Yale University and studied law at Harvard. In 1916, his first musical comedy, See America First , failed after fifteen performances. In 1919, he married Linda Lee Thomas, a wealthy, socially prominent divorcee, eight years older than he. Biographies have indicated that Porter, a secret homosexual, and his wife lived separate lives for much of their marriage. Porter wrote many successful shows including Fifty Million Frenchmen , Wake Up and Dream , Anything Goes , DuBarry Was a Lady and Silk Stockings , as well as film scores. Contrary to the film's story, Monty Woolley was not a professor of Porter's, but a fellow student, and Porter was never wounded in World War I, although he did have a serious horseback riding accident in the mid-1930s which eventually resulted in the amputation of one leg in 1956. The film's credits state that it was "based on the career of Cole Porter." The chronology of Porter's songs and musical plays was altered for the film. Modern sources speculate that the character of "Carol Hall" was based on Ethel Merman. Mary Martin first attracted attention for her singing of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" in Porter's musical Leave It To Me , and the song became her signature. Night and Day marked Martin's last major film appearance, although she did appear as herself in the 1953 M-G-M release Main Street to Broadway .
       Hal B. Wallis was slated to produce the picture, but left the studio before the start of filming because of a disagreement with Jack L. Warner. According to a 20 Sep 1945 HR news item, the film's pre-production costs were almost $4,000,000, with $1,000,000 being spent just on developing the script. Papers in the Warner Bros. Collection at the USC Cinema-Television Library add the following information about the production: Elick Moll, Steve Fisher, Tom D'Andrea, Philip G. Epstein, Stephen Morehouse Avery and Joseph Than all worked on various versions of the screenplay. The extent of their contribution to the final film is not known. In a telegram dated 15 Sep 1945, Jack Moffitt, who is credited onscreen with the adaptation, protested his credit. The scenes at Yale University were actually filmed on location at Los Angeles City College, CA. Other scenes were filmed in California at the Busch Gardens in Pasadena, the Warner Bros. Ranch, the Providencia Ranch in Universal City and in Beverly Hills. Cinematographer Bert Glennon was replaced by Peverell Marley on 26 Jun 1945, two weeks after production began. From 6 Oct to 12 Oct 1945, strike conditions stopped work on the film.
       Ray Heindorf and Max Steiner were nominated for an Academy Award for their musical score. The film clip of Roy Rogers singing "Don't Fence Me In" is from the 1945 Republic picture of the same name (see above). In 2004 De-Lovely , another film biography of Porter, was released. That film, directed by Irwin Winkler and starring Kevin Kline as Porter and Ashley Judd as his wife, combined musical numbers based on Porter's songs with biographical scenes. The film centered on the complex relationship between the Porters and the songwriter's bisexuality, a fact not publicly discussed until after his death in 1964. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
13 Jul 1946.
---
Daily Variety
9 Jul 46
p. 3, 8
Film Daily
9 Jul 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 45
p. 25.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 46
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Feb 46
p. 2838.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Jul 46
p. 3089.
New York Times
26 Jul 46
p. 16.
Variety
10 Jul 46
p. 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Sig Ruman
Eddie Kelly
Wally Scott
Vivian Oakland
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Stills
Stills gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
Dance cost des
MUSIC
Prod numbers orch and cond
Addl mus comp and adpt
Vocal arr
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Matte paintings
Matte paintings
DANCE
Dance nos created and dir
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr clerk
Best boy
STAND INS
Stand-in for Cary Grant
Stand-in for Alexis Smith
Stand-in for Monty Wooley
Stand-in for Henry Stephenson
Stand-in for Dorothy Malone
Stand-in for Donald Woods
Stand-in for Selena Royle
Stand-in for Jane Wyman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col dir
Assoc
Technicolor tech
Technicolor asst cam
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Wonder What's Become of Sally," music and lyrics by Jack Yellen and Milton Ager
"Bulldog! Bulldog! Bow, Wow, Wow," "I'm in Love Again," "In the Still of the Night," "Old-Fashioned Garden," "You've Got that Thing," "Let's Do It," "You Do Something to Me," "Begin the Beguine," "Night and Day," "I'm Unlucky at Gambling," "Miss Otis Regrets," "What is This Thing Called Love?" "I've Got You Under My Skin," "Rosalie," "Just One of Those Things," "Anything Goes," "You're the Top," "Blow, Gabriel, Blow," "I Get a Kick Out of You," "Easy to Love," "Love for Sale," "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" and "Don't Fence Me In," music and lyrics by Cole Porter.
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 August 1946
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 26 July 1946
Production Date:
14 June--30 October 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
3 August 1946
Copyright Number:
LP496
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Duration(in mins):
128
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11173
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Yale University law student Cole Porter's studies suffer because of his interest in the theater. During the 1914 Christmas holidays, Cole travels home to Indiana with his sympathetic law professor, Monty Woolley, and his friend, Ward Blackburn. Also visiting the Porter home are Cole's cousin Nancy and her roommate, the well-to-do Linda Lee. At home, Cole tells his disapproving grandfather Omer that he does not intend to return to Yale, but will instead try to earn a living as a songwriter. Upon returning to the city, Cole and Monty put together a theatrical show called See America First , starring Cole's friend, Gracie Harris. Nancy, Ward and Linda are in the audience on opening night, but Cole's mother remains in Indiana with his grandfather, who refuses to come. The Lusitania is sunk by the Germans the same night, and Cole's show closes after one performance. Cole then joins the French army and is injured. While recuperating in a French hospital, he encounters Linda, who is working there as a nurse. In an effort to ease Cole's despondency, Linda buys a piano for the hospital and Cole recovers enough to write "Night and Day." Linda proposes that Cole join her in a villa on the Riviera, and although Cole loves Linda, he explains that he does not want to take her money anymore than he wanted to take his family's money and intends to return to America to work on his own. In New York, Cole takes a job playing the piano in a music store. Tired of trying to sell the same ... +


Yale University law student Cole Porter's studies suffer because of his interest in the theater. During the 1914 Christmas holidays, Cole travels home to Indiana with his sympathetic law professor, Monty Woolley, and his friend, Ward Blackburn. Also visiting the Porter home are Cole's cousin Nancy and her roommate, the well-to-do Linda Lee. At home, Cole tells his disapproving grandfather Omer that he does not intend to return to Yale, but will instead try to earn a living as a songwriter. Upon returning to the city, Cole and Monty put together a theatrical show called See America First , starring Cole's friend, Gracie Harris. Nancy, Ward and Linda are in the audience on opening night, but Cole's mother remains in Indiana with his grandfather, who refuses to come. The Lusitania is sunk by the Germans the same night, and Cole's show closes after one performance. Cole then joins the French army and is injured. While recuperating in a French hospital, he encounters Linda, who is working there as a nurse. In an effort to ease Cole's despondency, Linda buys a piano for the hospital and Cole recovers enough to write "Night and Day." Linda proposes that Cole join her in a villa on the Riviera, and although Cole loves Linda, he explains that he does not want to take her money anymore than he wanted to take his family's money and intends to return to America to work on his own. In New York, Cole takes a job playing the piano in a music store. Tired of trying to sell the same old songs, Cole's partner, singer Carole Hill, sings one of his compositions, and encouraged by its warm reception, Cole and Monty, who is now working as an actor, produce another show, The New Yorkers . This show is an enormous hit, as is Cole's following show. Eventually Cole is offered the opportunity to write a show in England. There he once again meets Linda, whom he has never stopped loving, and they marry. Immediately after the wedding, Cole and Linda return to New York, where Cole goes into production on yet another show. Cole continues to promise Linda that they will take a trip together, but as soon as one show is completed, he begins another. Finally, Linda becomes tired of Cole's promises and leaves for Europe alone. When Cole's mother telephones with the news that his grandfather is dying, Cole immediately flies to Indiana, and before Omer dies, he and Cole are reconciled. A disheartened Cole stays on in Indiana and, during a storm, is severely injured when he is thrown by a horse. The injury aggravates Cole's war wounds, and he loses the use of his legs. Before he undergoes a long series of operations, Cole forbids Monty to tell Linda about his injury. Later, Cole attends a tribute at Yale. Monty arranges for Linda to surprise him there, and the couple is reunited. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.