The Strange Woman (1946)

101 mins | Melodrama | 25 October 1946

Director:

Edgar G. Ulmer

Writer:

Herb Meadow

Producer:

Jack Chertok

Cinematographer:

Lucien Andriot

Production Company:

Mars Film Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The HR review notes that Hedy Lamarr and Jack Chertok formed a partnership to produce this film. Production on the film shut down between 13 Dec 1945 and 3 Jan 1946 due to Hedy Lamarr's bout with the ... More Less

The HR review notes that Hedy Lamarr and Jack Chertok formed a partnership to produce this film. Production on the film shut down between 13 Dec 1945 and 3 Jan 1946 due to Hedy Lamarr's bout with the flu. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Nov 1946.
---
Daily Variety
28 Oct 46
p. 3, 12
Film Daily
1 Nov 46
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 45
p. 1, 13
Hollywood Reporter
9 Dec 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jan 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 46
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 46
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Mar 46
p. 2884.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Nov 46
p. 3285.
New York Times
24 Feb 47
p. 16.
Variety
30 Oct 46
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Hunt Stromberg Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des and art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Strange Woman by Ben Ames Williams (Boston, 1941).
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 October 1946
Production Date:
10 December 1945--mid March 1946 at the Samuel Goldwyn Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Mars Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
25 October 1946
Copyright Number:
LP692
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
101
Length(in feet):
9,083
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11074
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As a child in Bangor, Maine in 1824, Jenny Hager, daughter of the town drunk Tim, has as her sole playmate Ephraim Poster, the son of Isaiah, the storekeeper. Jenny, whose mother abandoned her as a baby, is a difficult girl, with a high opinion of herself. Several years later, she has grown into a beautiful woman and Ephraim has gone away to school in England. When a boatload of sailors docks, Jenny sets her sights on the captain, and Isaiah, a widower who is attracted to Jenny, tells Tim that his daughter is consorting with sailors. Accusing Jenny of behaving like her mother, Tim beats her, then collapses and dies. Jenny runs to Isaiah's house for help, and while his housekeeper bathes her wounds, the town elders decide to marry her to the wealthy Isaiah. Jenny agrees to the marriage, but soon after the marriage writes Ephraim a seductive letter persuading him to come home. Jenny then asks proper Meg Saladine to teach her to act like a lady. When the minister asks his wealthy congregation for money to enlarge the church, none will give until Jenny offers $1,000 of her husband's money and the other wives follow suit, ensuring Jenny's reputation as a devout woman. After Ephraim returns, Isaiah jealously tries to drive him away, but Jenny persuades her husband to let him stay. She then carefully makes sure that Ephraim falls in love with her. When Isaiah falls ill, Jenny devotedly cares for him, but after he recovers, she becomes hysterical because she had secretly planned to marry Ephraim and live on Isaiah's money. When trouble ... +


As a child in Bangor, Maine in 1824, Jenny Hager, daughter of the town drunk Tim, has as her sole playmate Ephraim Poster, the son of Isaiah, the storekeeper. Jenny, whose mother abandoned her as a baby, is a difficult girl, with a high opinion of herself. Several years later, she has grown into a beautiful woman and Ephraim has gone away to school in England. When a boatload of sailors docks, Jenny sets her sights on the captain, and Isaiah, a widower who is attracted to Jenny, tells Tim that his daughter is consorting with sailors. Accusing Jenny of behaving like her mother, Tim beats her, then collapses and dies. Jenny runs to Isaiah's house for help, and while his housekeeper bathes her wounds, the town elders decide to marry her to the wealthy Isaiah. Jenny agrees to the marriage, but soon after the marriage writes Ephraim a seductive letter persuading him to come home. Jenny then asks proper Meg Saladine to teach her to act like a lady. When the minister asks his wealthy congregation for money to enlarge the church, none will give until Jenny offers $1,000 of her husband's money and the other wives follow suit, ensuring Jenny's reputation as a devout woman. After Ephraim returns, Isaiah jealously tries to drive him away, but Jenny persuades her husband to let him stay. She then carefully makes sure that Ephraim falls in love with her. When Isaiah falls ill, Jenny devotedly cares for him, but after he recovers, she becomes hysterical because she had secretly planned to marry Ephraim and live on Isaiah's money. When trouble breaks out in town among the lumberjacks, John Evered, Isaiah's foreman and Meg's fiancé, helps quell the fighting. Jenny is immediately infatuated with John and invites him and Meg to dinner that evening. Soon, however, John returns to the woods, and Isaiah decides to visit his holdings there. He insists that Ephraim accompany him on the canoe trip, even though Ephraim is terrified of the water. Before they leave, Jenny suggests that Ephraim arrange for his father's death on the trip. After Ephraim accidentally upsets the canoe and Isaiah drowns, Jenny forbids him to enter the house and drives him to drink. She then takes over the management of her dead husband's properties and promotes John to a job in town. A drunken Ephraim tries to tell the townspeople the truth about Jenny, but they are now convinced that she is a respectable woman and do not believe him. John questions Ephraim carefully about his accusations and then suggests that Jenny confront Ephraim and prove her innocence. When John and Jenny arrive at Ephraim's cabin, however, he has hanged himself. While John cuts down the body, Jenny scares away their horses, and they are forced to stay all night together in the cabin. Soon Jenny and John are married. The marriage is happy, although Jenny discovers that she is unable to have children. When Lincoln Pittridge, a revivalist preacher, proclaims that an evil woman cannot reproduce, Jenny believes that he can see into her soul and tells John that Ephraim's stories about her were true. This is too much for John, and he leaves her. The next morning Jenny finds him in the country with Meg. Although John has told Meg that he intends to return to Jenny because he loves her, Jenny tries to run them over in a jealous fit and is thrown over a cliff to her death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.