To Each His Own (1946)

122 mins | Melodrama | 5 July 1946

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HISTORY

The foreword to the film states: "The most mysterious mysteries are people, and usually people who don't seem mysterious at all. Take Miss Norris, for instance. Here she is, a middle-aged American woman, walking down a London street on a blacked-out New Year's Eve...." This film marked the motion picture debut of stage actor John Lund and the American film debut of British actor Roland Culver. HR news items list Frank Craven, Jean Sullivan and Ralph Dunn in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Alma Macrorie, the film's editor, also appeared in the picture. The NYT review of the film states: "Olivia de Havilland...may now take her exalted place alongside Helen Hayes, Ruth Chatterton and Bette Davis as a tragic heroine who loved unwisely and suffered terrible consequences with heroic fortitude."
       According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the the AMPAS Library, the PCA did object to the film's "happy ending" of Griggsy meeting his mother, stating that it was unacceptable under the Code formula for dealing with stories of illicit sex and illegitimacy. Producer/writer Charles Brackett met with representatives of the PCA in May 1945 to negotiate the film's ending and insisted that he needed the recognition scene at the end. He did agree, however, to write an alternate scene in which the recognition between mother and son would be merely a fleeting one and not a complete reunion, but it was not used. Brackett also agreed to rewrite some of the sequences just before and after the birth of the child to strengthen the "compensating moral values" required by the ... More Less

The foreword to the film states: "The most mysterious mysteries are people, and usually people who don't seem mysterious at all. Take Miss Norris, for instance. Here she is, a middle-aged American woman, walking down a London street on a blacked-out New Year's Eve...." This film marked the motion picture debut of stage actor John Lund and the American film debut of British actor Roland Culver. HR news items list Frank Craven, Jean Sullivan and Ralph Dunn in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Alma Macrorie, the film's editor, also appeared in the picture. The NYT review of the film states: "Olivia de Havilland...may now take her exalted place alongside Helen Hayes, Ruth Chatterton and Bette Davis as a tragic heroine who loved unwisely and suffered terrible consequences with heroic fortitude."
       According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the the AMPAS Library, the PCA did object to the film's "happy ending" of Griggsy meeting his mother, stating that it was unacceptable under the Code formula for dealing with stories of illicit sex and illegitimacy. Producer/writer Charles Brackett met with representatives of the PCA in May 1945 to negotiate the film's ending and insisted that he needed the recognition scene at the end. He did agree, however, to write an alternate scene in which the recognition between mother and son would be merely a fleeting one and not a complete reunion, but it was not used. Brackett also agreed to rewrite some of the sequences just before and after the birth of the child to strengthen the "compensating moral values" required by the Production Code, and to avoid "minimizing the importance of Jody's sin." The expression "bastard" and any suggestion or reference to abortion were forbidden under the Code.
       In an article in SEP entitled "The Role I Liked Best," Olivia de Havilland stated that Brackett stalled production on this film for a year until she won her court battle to be released from her contract at Warner Bros. studio and agreed to Mitchell Leisen as her choice of director. For additional information on De Havilland's contract dispute, see entries above for The Well Groomed Bride , Government Girl and Princess O'Rourke . De Havilland won an Academy Award for Best Actress for the film, and Charles Brackett was nominated for Writing (Original Story). A title song, written by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston for exploitation purposes, was not used in the released film but became one of the biggest hits of the year. Olivia De Havilland, Griff Barnett and John Lund reprised their roles in a 2 Jan 1950 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast. Dorothy McGuire and Gene Barry starred in a 26 Aug 1954 Lux Video Theatre presentation of the story. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Mar 1946.
---
Daily Variety
12 Mar 46
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Mar 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 45
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 45
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 45
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 46
p. 1, 12
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 46
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Feb 46
p. 2861.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Mar 46
p. 2895.
New York Times
24 May 46
p. 15.
New York Times
2 Jun 1946.
---
The Saturday Evening Post
1 Mar 1947.
---
Variety
13 Mar 46
p. 10.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Olivia deHavilland
Jimmy Dundee
William Hunter
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mitchell Leisen Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2nd cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff, miniatures
Spec optical eff
Transparency projection shots
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Research dir
Research asst
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 July 1946
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 23 May 1946
Production Date:
25 June--14 September 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 July 1946
Copyright Number:
LP440
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
122
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1116
SYNOPSIS

During World War II, while London endures New Year's Eve during a blackout, Jody Norris, a middle-aged American woman, turns down a date with another lonely Londoner, Lord Desham, to meet a train. Onboard is Lieutenant Gregory Pierson, the son of Jody's friends from her hometown, Pierson Falls. While she waits, Jody recalls the summer of 1918, just before the end of World War I, when she was a very young woman: When Jody turns down a proposal from Lieutenant Alex Pierson, he proposes to Corinne Sturges. That night, Jody falls in love with a young flier, Captain Cosgrove, and makes love with him, even though she knows he is in town only for a few hours. Soon Jody discovers that she is pregnant and is told by a doctor that for her own safety, she must terminate the pregnancy. When she learns that Cosgrove has been killed in battle, Jody decides to keep the baby. After Jody secretly gives birth to a son, Daisy Gingras, her nurse, gives the baby to Jody's neighbor Belle Ingham, saying that the infant is a war orphan, so that Jody can offer to adopt him without scandal. Belle, however, gives the baby to Corinne, whose own baby has just died, and he is named Gregory. Heartbroken, Jody visits the baby frequently and nicknames him "Griggsy." After her father dies and Jody sells their family drugstore, she asks Corinne to hire her as Griggsy's nurse. When Corinne refuses, Jody shows her Griggsy's birth certificate and confesses that he is her son. Corinne refuses to give up Griggsy, because Alex is still in love with Jody. Jody moves to New ... +


During World War II, while London endures New Year's Eve during a blackout, Jody Norris, a middle-aged American woman, turns down a date with another lonely Londoner, Lord Desham, to meet a train. Onboard is Lieutenant Gregory Pierson, the son of Jody's friends from her hometown, Pierson Falls. While she waits, Jody recalls the summer of 1918, just before the end of World War I, when she was a very young woman: When Jody turns down a proposal from Lieutenant Alex Pierson, he proposes to Corinne Sturges. That night, Jody falls in love with a young flier, Captain Cosgrove, and makes love with him, even though she knows he is in town only for a few hours. Soon Jody discovers that she is pregnant and is told by a doctor that for her own safety, she must terminate the pregnancy. When she learns that Cosgrove has been killed in battle, Jody decides to keep the baby. After Jody secretly gives birth to a son, Daisy Gingras, her nurse, gives the baby to Jody's neighbor Belle Ingham, saying that the infant is a war orphan, so that Jody can offer to adopt him without scandal. Belle, however, gives the baby to Corinne, whose own baby has just died, and he is named Gregory. Heartbroken, Jody visits the baby frequently and nicknames him "Griggsy." After her father dies and Jody sells their family drugstore, she asks Corinne to hire her as Griggsy's nurse. When Corinne refuses, Jody shows her Griggsy's birth certificate and confesses that he is her son. Corinne refuses to give up Griggsy, because Alex is still in love with Jody. Jody moves to New York and builds a successful cosmetics business with her friend Mac Tilton, who loves her. Jody tells him she has a young son, and he again proposes, but she turns him down. Meanwhile, she continues to see Griggsy when he and Alex come to New York. When she learns that Alex and Corinne are nearly bankrupt, Jody blackmails Corinne into giving up Griggsy in exchange for a loan. After two months with Jody, Griggsy longs to be home with Corinne, and when Jody tells him Corinne adopted him, he becomes hysterical and says that his mother already told him about it and loves him best because she chose him. Heartbroken, Jody returns Griggsy to the Piersons and goes to London to immerse herself in work. Back in the present, Jody introduces herself to Griggsy and offers him a place to stay, hoping to finally have a week alone with him. His mind is on getting married while on leave to his girl friend, Liz Lorimer, however, and Desham makes arrangements for a wedding ceremony that night. After Desham intimates to Griggsy that Jody is more than just a kind benefactor, Liz tells Griggsy that Jody acts as if he were her own son. Griggsy finally realizes who Jody is, and calling her "mother," asks her to dance. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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