Cynthia (1947)

96-98 mins | Comedy-drama | July 1947

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HISTORY

According to a Jul 1945 HR news item, M-G-M acquired the rights to Viña Delmar's play by agreeing to pay fifteen percent of the play's gross up to $225,000. The studio also invested between $20,000 and $25,000 in the stage production in exchange for a twenty-five percent interest. A Sep 1945 HR news item noted that Elizabeth Taylor was originally set to star in the play, but her mother refused to allow her to travel east for the role. Although the same news item noted that M-G-M's financial participation in the play was contingent upon Taylor playing the title role, no information has been found to suggest that the studio renegotiated its deal after Taylor's departure. Taylor, George Murphy and Mary Astor reprised their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story that was broadcast on 23 Jun ... More Less

According to a Jul 1945 HR news item, M-G-M acquired the rights to Viña Delmar's play by agreeing to pay fifteen percent of the play's gross up to $225,000. The studio also invested between $20,000 and $25,000 in the stage production in exchange for a twenty-five percent interest. A Sep 1945 HR news item noted that Elizabeth Taylor was originally set to star in the play, but her mother refused to allow her to travel east for the role. Although the same news item noted that M-G-M's financial participation in the play was contingent upon Taylor playing the title role, no information has been found to suggest that the studio renegotiated its deal after Taylor's departure. Taylor, George Murphy and Mary Astor reprised their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre version of the story that was broadcast on 23 Jun 1947. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 May 1947.
---
Daily Variety
13 May 1947.
---
Film Daily
20 May 47
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 46
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jan 47
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
13 May 47
p. 6.
New York Times
19 Sep 47
p. 27.
Variety
14 May 47
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Robert Z. Leonard Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
MAKEUP
Makeup created by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Rich, Full Life by Viña Delmar, as presented by Gilbert Miller (New York, 9 Nov 1945).
SONGS
"Melody of Spring," based on music by Johann Strauss II, adapted with lyrics by Ralph Freed and Johnny Green
"Buckle Down, Winsocki" music and lyrics by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Rich, Full Life
Release Date:
July 1947
Production Date:
14 November 1946--early January 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 May 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1011
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
96-98
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12231
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Louise Bishop, a devoted wife and mother, fondly recalls the time, seventeen years earlier, when she was a freshman studying music at Wyandott College: At a party celebrating the school baseball team's victory, Louise falls in love with Larry Bishop, the player who hit the home-run that won the championship. A romance ensues, and one day Louise tells Larry her hopes of continuing her studies at the Vienna Conservatory. Larry tells her that he too plans to go to Vienna to study medicine. At the end of the school year, Louise goes to Michigan for the summer, while Larry returns to his hometown of Napoleon, Illinois, to work at J. M. Dingle's hardware store. Larry and Louise return to school in the fall, and a short time after they are married, Louise discovers that she is pregnant. After agreeing to postpone their plans for future studies, Larry and Louise move to Napoleon to raise a family. Cynthia is born frail and delicate, and when the doctor bills begin to mount, Louise and Larry realize that they may never be able to study in Vienna. Louise comes out of her reverie while recalling Cynthia's protected childhood and the beginning of her high school years in Napoleon. Cynthia, who is now fifteen years old and still prone to illness, is unaware that her parents made enormous sacrifices for her. One day, while walking home from school, Cynthia pays a visit to her uncle, Dr. Fred I. Jannings, who is treating her with various shots and immunizations. Cynthia then visits her voice instructor, Professor Rosenkrantz, who suggests that she audition for the next school opera. Meanwhile, Larry, ... +


Louise Bishop, a devoted wife and mother, fondly recalls the time, seventeen years earlier, when she was a freshman studying music at Wyandott College: At a party celebrating the school baseball team's victory, Louise falls in love with Larry Bishop, the player who hit the home-run that won the championship. A romance ensues, and one day Louise tells Larry her hopes of continuing her studies at the Vienna Conservatory. Larry tells her that he too plans to go to Vienna to study medicine. At the end of the school year, Louise goes to Michigan for the summer, while Larry returns to his hometown of Napoleon, Illinois, to work at J. M. Dingle's hardware store. Larry and Louise return to school in the fall, and a short time after they are married, Louise discovers that she is pregnant. After agreeing to postpone their plans for future studies, Larry and Louise move to Napoleon to raise a family. Cynthia is born frail and delicate, and when the doctor bills begin to mount, Louise and Larry realize that they may never be able to study in Vienna. Louise comes out of her reverie while recalling Cynthia's protected childhood and the beginning of her high school years in Napoleon. Cynthia, who is now fifteen years old and still prone to illness, is unaware that her parents made enormous sacrifices for her. One day, while walking home from school, Cynthia pays a visit to her uncle, Dr. Fred I. Jannings, who is treating her with various shots and immunizations. Cynthia then visits her voice instructor, Professor Rosenkrantz, who suggests that she audition for the next school opera. Meanwhile, Larry, who is still working at Dingle's hardware store, struggles to make ends meet for his family and is considering buying the house that they are renting. Fred, however, refuses to give his endorsement for Larry's bank loan, and Louise rejects the idea of buying the house because she sees it as an impediment to their future plans. Uable to participate in most of the school activities because of her health history, Cynthia begins to feel like an outcast and resents being treated as if she were always sick. Her despair soon fades, however, when her singing attracts the attention of the school's most popular student, Ricky Latham. A romance blossoms, much to the dismay of Cynthia's jealous cousin, Fredonia Jannings, and her friend, Stella Regan. Cynthia is eventually awarded the leading role in the school play, but Louise and Larry are concerned that she does not have the physical strength to perform in the show. Their fears are soon realized when Cynthia falls ill with the flu and is forced to bow out of the play. Fred later admonishes Louise for encouraging Cynthia beyond her capacity, but Louise wonders whether they have relied too heavily upon Fred's advice. Cynthia returns to school a few days before the spring prom, and Ricky asks her to be his date for the dance. The night of the dance, Louise deceives her husband and secretly allows Cynthia to attend the dance against his wishes. While Cynthia has a wonderful time at the ball, Larry learns that he was tricked and bitterly criticizes Louise. The following morning, Larry oversleeps and goes into work late for the first time in fifteen years. When Larry learns that Dingle is upset about his tardiness, he angrily accuses his boss of unfair treatment, quits his job and plans to move his family to Chicago. Louise is happy to see that her husband has finally stood up for himself, but Cynthia rejects her parents' plans to move. The Bishops decide to stay in Napoleon, and their financial troubles are solved when Dingle shows up to beg Larry to return to his job. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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