It Happened on 5th Avenue (1947)

115-116 mins | Comedy | 19 April 1947

Director:

Roy Del Ruth

Writer:

Everett Freeman

Producer:

Roy Del Ruth

Cinematographer:

Henry Sharp

Production Designer:

Lewis H. Creber

Production Company:

Allied Artists Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

This film was the first produced under the Allied Artists brand. Allied Artists, which was formed in Nov 1946, was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Monogram Pictures Corp. and initially the producing arm for Monogram's high-budget pictures. In Sep 1952, Monogram announced that henceforth it would produce only films bearing the Allied Artists name.
       Portions of this film were shot at Newport News, VA. According to a HR news item, footage of the first post-war Easter parade on New York City's Fifth Avenue, on 21 Apr 1946, was shot for the film. To promote the picture, Monogram sponsored a parade in Manhattan with New York's Fifth Avenue Merchants Association, as well as a six-week cross-country bus tour, which ended in Los Angeles. HR also notes that the film's songs were to be published by Chappell and Co. and released in time for the picture's Easter week opening. Harry Revel's "That's What Christmas Means to Me" became a minor Christmas standard. Herbert Clyde Lewis and Frederick Stephani were nominated for an Academy Award for Writing (Original Story) for the film. Don DeFore and Charlie Ruggles reprised their roles in a 19 May 1947 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast, co-starring Victor ... More Less

This film was the first produced under the Allied Artists brand. Allied Artists, which was formed in Nov 1946, was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Monogram Pictures Corp. and initially the producing arm for Monogram's high-budget pictures. In Sep 1952, Monogram announced that henceforth it would produce only films bearing the Allied Artists name.
       Portions of this film were shot at Newport News, VA. According to a HR news item, footage of the first post-war Easter parade on New York City's Fifth Avenue, on 21 Apr 1946, was shot for the film. To promote the picture, Monogram sponsored a parade in Manhattan with New York's Fifth Avenue Merchants Association, as well as a six-week cross-country bus tour, which ended in Los Angeles. HR also notes that the film's songs were to be published by Chappell and Co. and released in time for the picture's Easter week opening. Harry Revel's "That's What Christmas Means to Me" became a minor Christmas standard. Herbert Clyde Lewis and Frederick Stephani were nominated for an Academy Award for Writing (Original Story) for the film. Don DeFore and Charlie Ruggles reprised their roles in a 19 May 1947 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast, co-starring Victor Moore. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Feb 1947.
---
Daily Variety
3 Feb 1947.
---
Film Daily
4 Feb 47
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 46
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Aug 46
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 46
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 47
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Feb 47
p. 3, 16
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 47
p. 21.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Mar 47
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 1947.
---
Independent Film Journal
12 Oct 46
p. 40.
Motion Picture Herald
4 May 1946.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Feb 47
p. 3457.
New York Times
11 Jun 47
p. 33.
Variety
5 Feb 47
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Roy Del Ruth Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Addl dial
Orig story
Orig story
Contr to dial and on spec seq
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Fashion supv
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus ed
SOUND
Rec eng
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Asst to the prod
SOURCES
SONGS
"It's a Wonderful Wonderful Feeling," "That's What Christmas Means to Me" and "Speak--My Heart," music and lyrics by Harry Revel
"You're Everywhere," music by Harry Revel, lyrics by Paul Webster.
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 April 1947
Production Date:
early August--mid October 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 March 1947
Copyright Number:
LP949
Duration(in mins):
115-116
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On New York City's Fifth Avenue, the "richest avenue in the world," a tour bus announcer points out the boarded-up townhouse of "industrial wizard" Michael O'Connor, the world's second richest man. As the bus passes, a middle-aged drifter and his dog Sam enter the O'Connor house through a loose board in the fence and a manhole, and spend the night. Meanwhile, O'Connor evicts the tenants of one of his city apartment houses in order to erect an eighty story building. One of his tenants, Jim Bullock, an out-of-work veteran, refuses to leave. He is eventually thrown out, and while sleeping on a park bench, meets the drifter, Aloysious T. McKeever, or "Mac." Mac invites Jim to stay with him at O'Connor's townhouse, which he has occupied for the last three winters while O'Connor resides in Virginia, and Jim assumes that Mac is O'Connor. Currently, O'Connor is preparing to buy Camp Kilson, a deserted army camp outside Manhattan, in order to build a massive air cargo network. He receives word that his daughter Trudy has run away from her finishing school. When Trudy arrives at the townhouse, Jim concludes that she is a thief, but lets her stay. Trudy quickly falls in love with Jim, and is determined to keep her identity a secret so that he won't love her for her money. When the night patrol arrives to check the house, Mac makes everyone hide and finally confesses to Jim and Trudy that he is an interloper. Later, Jim meets two friends from the service, Hank and Whitey, and their wives and children, who are living in a car due to the ... +


On New York City's Fifth Avenue, the "richest avenue in the world," a tour bus announcer points out the boarded-up townhouse of "industrial wizard" Michael O'Connor, the world's second richest man. As the bus passes, a middle-aged drifter and his dog Sam enter the O'Connor house through a loose board in the fence and a manhole, and spend the night. Meanwhile, O'Connor evicts the tenants of one of his city apartment houses in order to erect an eighty story building. One of his tenants, Jim Bullock, an out-of-work veteran, refuses to leave. He is eventually thrown out, and while sleeping on a park bench, meets the drifter, Aloysious T. McKeever, or "Mac." Mac invites Jim to stay with him at O'Connor's townhouse, which he has occupied for the last three winters while O'Connor resides in Virginia, and Jim assumes that Mac is O'Connor. Currently, O'Connor is preparing to buy Camp Kilson, a deserted army camp outside Manhattan, in order to build a massive air cargo network. He receives word that his daughter Trudy has run away from her finishing school. When Trudy arrives at the townhouse, Jim concludes that she is a thief, but lets her stay. Trudy quickly falls in love with Jim, and is determined to keep her identity a secret so that he won't love her for her money. When the night patrol arrives to check the house, Mac makes everyone hide and finally confesses to Jim and Trudy that he is an interloper. Later, Jim meets two friends from the service, Hank and Whitey, and their wives and children, who are living in a car due to the postwar housing shortage, and invites them to stay at the townhouse, too. With Mac's help, Jim, Whitey and Hank are inspired to design a model to renovate vacant army barracks into housing projects, and decide to bid on Camp Kilson. Soon O'Connor arrives in New York and finds Trudy leaving for her new job at a music shop. Although he orders her back to school, she insists that she has spent her life being lonely and now wants Jim. O'Connor wants to meet Jim and reluctantly agrees to pose as a drifter, after which Trudy and Jim convince Mac to let O'Connor become another "guest" at the mansion. It is not long before O'Connor is fed up with his house guests and threatens to call the police. Trudy sends for her mother, however, who years before reluctantly divorced O'Connor because business was his first priority. Mary and O'Connor rekindle their love for each other, and on Christmas Eve, Mac encourages them to marry, unaware of their true relationship. When Mary finds out that O'Connor outbid Jim on Camp Kilson, and tried to give him a job in Bolivia, to take him away from Trudy, however, she determines to leave him. After Trudy also scolds him, O'Connor lets Jim buy the camp. On New Year's Eve, the houseguests all celebrate the contract, and prepare to leave the townhouse. Although Trudy and Jim and Mary and O'Connor offer Mac a room, he assures them he has a place to stay, O'Connor's house in Virginia, then says goodbye. O'Connor tells Mary that next November, Mac will be coming through the front door. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.