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HISTORY

According to the Mar-Aug 1924 issue of Picture-Play Magazine, filmmaker Sydney Franklin had long hoped to adapt Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel, The Age of Innocence, with actress Jetta Goudal as “Countess Ellen Olenska.” However, the 20 Aug 1920 Var announced that film rights had fallen to Wesley Ruggles, who directed a screenplay he wrote with Olga Printzlau. An article in the Dec 1924 Pictures and Picturegoers stated that actress Beverly Bayne had stopped performing in films in 1918, but was inspired to return to the screen for Modern Marriage (1923, see entry) and The Age of Innocence when her husband and frequent onscreen lover, Francis X. Bushman, accepted a leading role in Ben-Hur (1925, see entry). Actor Elliott Dexter postponed his theater production of The Havoc to appear in the film, and received a salary of $10,000, as reported in the 27 Aug 1924 Var.
       The 1 Nov 1924 Exhibitor’s Trade Review announced the completion of principal photography.
       Wharton’s novel also formed the basis for two other films of the same name: RKO’s 1934 production starring Irene Dunne and John Boles; and Columbia Picture’s 1993 adaptation directed by Martin Scorsese, which starred Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Winona ... More Less

According to the Mar-Aug 1924 issue of Picture-Play Magazine, filmmaker Sydney Franklin had long hoped to adapt Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel, The Age of Innocence, with actress Jetta Goudal as “Countess Ellen Olenska.” However, the 20 Aug 1920 Var announced that film rights had fallen to Wesley Ruggles, who directed a screenplay he wrote with Olga Printzlau. An article in the Dec 1924 Pictures and Picturegoers stated that actress Beverly Bayne had stopped performing in films in 1918, but was inspired to return to the screen for Modern Marriage (1923, see entry) and The Age of Innocence when her husband and frequent onscreen lover, Francis X. Bushman, accepted a leading role in Ben-Hur (1925, see entry). Actor Elliott Dexter postponed his theater production of The Havoc to appear in the film, and received a salary of $10,000, as reported in the 27 Aug 1924 Var.
       The 1 Nov 1924 Exhibitor’s Trade Review announced the completion of principal photography.
       Wharton’s novel also formed the basis for two other films of the same name: RKO’s 1934 production starring Irene Dunne and John Boles; and Columbia Picture’s 1993 adaptation directed by Martin Scorsese, which starred Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Winona Ryder. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
4 Oct 1924
p. 32.
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Nov 1924
p. 37.
Picture-Play Magazine
Mar-Aug 1924.
---
Pictures and Picturegoer
Dec 1924
p. 28.
Variety
20 Aug 1924
p. 23.
Variety
27 Aug 1924
p. 13.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 November 1924
Production Date:
ended late October 1924
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers Pictures
Copyright Date:
3 November 1924
Copyright Number:
LP20739
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,700
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Countess Ellen Olenska leaves her brutish husband in Poland and returns to her socially prominent New York family, which is concerned lest there be scandal. Thus, there is a reception for Ellen, at which is announced the engagement of Ellen's cousin, May Mingott, and Newland Archer. Several men, including Newland, are attracted to Ellen, and the countess later finds it easy to lead a gay life with bohemian friends. A passionate love springs up between Ellen and Newland, despite the resistance of both to it. Newland marries May and hopes to forget Ellen, but in a subsequent meeting they decide to go away together. Visiting Ellen, May shares a confidence that causes the countess to decide to return to her husband. Ellen bids farewell to Newland with the suggestion that he can learn the reason from his wife. Receiving the news that May expects a child, Newland repents and resolves to be worthy of his ... +


Countess Ellen Olenska leaves her brutish husband in Poland and returns to her socially prominent New York family, which is concerned lest there be scandal. Thus, there is a reception for Ellen, at which is announced the engagement of Ellen's cousin, May Mingott, and Newland Archer. Several men, including Newland, are attracted to Ellen, and the countess later finds it easy to lead a gay life with bohemian friends. A passionate love springs up between Ellen and Newland, despite the resistance of both to it. Newland marries May and hopes to forget Ellen, but in a subsequent meeting they decide to go away together. Visiting Ellen, May shares a confidence that causes the countess to decide to return to her husband. Ellen bids farewell to Newland with the suggestion that he can learn the reason from his wife. Receiving the news that May expects a child, Newland repents and resolves to be worthy of his wife. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Society


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.