My Favorite Brunette (1947)

87 mins | Comedy | 4 April 1947

Director:

Elliott Nugent

Producer:

Danny Dare

Cinematographer:

Lionel Lindon

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Earl Hedrick

Production Company:

Hope Enterprises, Inc.
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HISTORY

Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour's screen credits appear on a florist's greeting card which reads: "From Bob Hope to Dorothy Lamour." This film was the first production of Hope Enterprises, Inc. It was a sequel, in name only, to Hope's 1942 film My Favorite Blonde (see above), which was this film's working title, in addition to The Private Eye . The film satirizes The Maltese Falcon , among other detective films. Alan Ladd makes a cameo appearance as a Detective Sam McCloud. Bing Crosby, who appeared throughout the 40s in the "Road to..." pictures as a friendly antagonist to Bob Hope, made an uncredited cameo appearance at the end of the film as Hope's would-be executioner. For more information on the "Road to..." pictures, in which Lamour also starred, consult the Series Index. My Favorite Brunette was Lamour's thirty-fifth picture, and during production, she celebrated her tenth anniversary at Paramount. The film marked Lon Chaney's first after leaving Universal Pictures. According to the Par News , the film includes shots of the one-million-dollar Paul Fagan mansion at Carmel, CA, on the Monterey Peninsula. Location shooting was also done in San Francisco, CA. According to a HR news item, the gas chamber and condemned row at San Quentin prison were recreated for the execution scene. According to Par News , in the film, Lamour wears a 14-karat gold dress which costumer Edith Head made out of the last of the gold-plated cloth in the Paramount studio's pre-war ... More Less

Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour's screen credits appear on a florist's greeting card which reads: "From Bob Hope to Dorothy Lamour." This film was the first production of Hope Enterprises, Inc. It was a sequel, in name only, to Hope's 1942 film My Favorite Blonde (see above), which was this film's working title, in addition to The Private Eye . The film satirizes The Maltese Falcon , among other detective films. Alan Ladd makes a cameo appearance as a Detective Sam McCloud. Bing Crosby, who appeared throughout the 40s in the "Road to..." pictures as a friendly antagonist to Bob Hope, made an uncredited cameo appearance at the end of the film as Hope's would-be executioner. For more information on the "Road to..." pictures, in which Lamour also starred, consult the Series Index. My Favorite Brunette was Lamour's thirty-fifth picture, and during production, she celebrated her tenth anniversary at Paramount. The film marked Lon Chaney's first after leaving Universal Pictures. According to the Par News , the film includes shots of the one-million-dollar Paul Fagan mansion at Carmel, CA, on the Monterey Peninsula. Location shooting was also done in San Francisco, CA. According to a HR news item, the gas chamber and condemned row at San Quentin prison were recreated for the execution scene. According to Par News , in the film, Lamour wears a 14-karat gold dress which costumer Edith Head made out of the last of the gold-plated cloth in the Paramount studio's pre-war stock. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Feb 1947.
---
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1947.
---
Film Daily
21 Feb 47
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 46
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 46
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 46
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 46
p. 11, 14
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 46
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 46
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 46
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 47
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 1947.
---
LOOK
15 Apr 47
pp. 86-91.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Feb 47
p. 3485.
New York Times
20 Mar 47
p. 38.
Variety
19 Feb 47
p. 8
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Supv
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Contr wrt to golf scenes
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Bus mgr
Unit casting dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Beside You," music and lyrics by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Private Eye
Release Date:
4 April 1947
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 March 1947
Production Date:
15 July--mid September 1946
Copyright Claimant:
Hope Enterprises, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 March 1947
Copyright Number:
LP899
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
87
Length(in feet):
7,985
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In San Quentin prison, baby photographer and amateur detective Ronnie Jackson, awaiting execution for murder, tells the press the story of his demise: Ever aspiring to be a detective, Ronnie invents a keyhole camera lens and buys a gun, hoping to work for private detective Sam McCloud, whose office is across from Ronnie's studio in San Francisco's Chinatown. When Sam goes to Chicago, he leaves Ronnie behind to man the telephones, and Ronnie takes the case of Carlotta Montay, a beautiful brunette whose uncle, Baron Montay, is in trouble. Carlotta is being tailed by Kismet, the henchman of Major Simon Montague, who is trying to steal the mineral rights to Montay's uranium mine in San Dimas, California. Carlotta gives the encoded map to the mines to Ronnie, and he hides it in the cup dispenser for his water cooler. He then drives to an address Carlotta gave him on the Monterey peninsula, an unoccupied mansion being used as Montague's headquarters. Montague, believing Ronnie is Sam, tells him that Carlotta is suffering from delusional tendencies, but after Ronnie takes a keyhole photograph of the wheelchair-bound baron walking, he realizes that one of Montague's men is posing as the baron, and that Carlotta is in danger. Kismet follows Ronnie to Sam's office to confiscate the photograph and knocks him out, then burns the negative. Ronnie then brings two policemen to the mansion, but they find it deserted except for Kismet, who poses as an immigrant gardener. Kismet plants a clue in Carlotta's room, which leads Ronnie to the Seacliffe Lodge, an expensive sanitarium, where he is taken hostage and held with Carlotta and the ... +


In San Quentin prison, baby photographer and amateur detective Ronnie Jackson, awaiting execution for murder, tells the press the story of his demise: Ever aspiring to be a detective, Ronnie invents a keyhole camera lens and buys a gun, hoping to work for private detective Sam McCloud, whose office is across from Ronnie's studio in San Francisco's Chinatown. When Sam goes to Chicago, he leaves Ronnie behind to man the telephones, and Ronnie takes the case of Carlotta Montay, a beautiful brunette whose uncle, Baron Montay, is in trouble. Carlotta is being tailed by Kismet, the henchman of Major Simon Montague, who is trying to steal the mineral rights to Montay's uranium mine in San Dimas, California. Carlotta gives the encoded map to the mines to Ronnie, and he hides it in the cup dispenser for his water cooler. He then drives to an address Carlotta gave him on the Monterey peninsula, an unoccupied mansion being used as Montague's headquarters. Montague, believing Ronnie is Sam, tells him that Carlotta is suffering from delusional tendencies, but after Ronnie takes a keyhole photograph of the wheelchair-bound baron walking, he realizes that one of Montague's men is posing as the baron, and that Carlotta is in danger. Kismet follows Ronnie to Sam's office to confiscate the photograph and knocks him out, then burns the negative. Ronnie then brings two policemen to the mansion, but they find it deserted except for Kismet, who poses as an immigrant gardener. Kismet plants a clue in Carlotta's room, which leads Ronnie to the Seacliffe Lodge, an expensive sanitarium, where he is taken hostage and held with Carlotta and the real baron. While Montague's men are away searching for the map, Ronnie and Carlotta escape. Following a tip from the baron, Ronnie and Carlotta meet James Collins, the engineer who encoded the map, and Ronnie and Collins go to the police. Outside the police station, Kismet shoots Collins dead with Ronnie's gun. Wanted for murder, Ronnie, in disguise, travels to Washington, D.C. with Carlotta in order to expose Montague, who is to meet with a representative from the State Department named Dawson. Ronnie and Carlotta pose as hotel service staff, enter Montague's suite after his meeting with Dawson and record Kismet confessing to the murder of Collins. Kismet switches the record albums, however, and Ronnie is arrested instead. In the present, Ronnie is pardoned because Sam has discovered that one of Ronnie's clients had the negative of his keyhole photograph. Now, as Carlotta and Ronnie embrace, his executioner frowns, disappointed. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.