Every Girl Should Be Married (1948)

84-85 mins | Romantic comedy | 9 November 1948

Director:

Don Hartman

Producer:

Don Hartman

Cinematographer:

George Diskant

Editor:

Harry Marker

Production Designers:

Albert D'Agostino, Carroll Clark

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Don Hartman's screen credit reads: "Produced, directed and co-written by Don Hartman." According to HR , Barbara Bel Geddes was to star in this picture. Betsy Drake, who made her screen debut in the film, was cast instead. The NYT review notes that Drake met co-star Cary Grant in London while she was acting in the stage play Deep Are the Roots . Grant was "reportedly intrigued by her evident talent and charm," and "when she came home...she went to Hollywood, called Mr. Grant, who arranged a screen test for her...." Modern sources claim that Grant not only supervised a rewrite of Drake's role to include some of her mannerisms, but directed much of the finished film as well. Modern sources also state that Grant instructed Drake to play the part like a young Katharine Hepburn. In its review, Var praised Drake, stating, "In a long part that keeps her within camera range for the full length of the film, Miss Drake's performance is a tour de force in the romantic comedy vein." The NYT review compared Drake favorably to Margaret Sullavan and called her a "refreshingly natural comic spirit" with "considerable promise of more formidable triumphs on the screen." Drake and Grant were married in 1949 and divorced ten years later. They appeared in one more film together, the 1952 picture Room for One More . Actress Lois Hall, who starred in adventure serials in the early 1950s, made her motion picture debut in Every Girl Should Be Married . Modern sources note that the film was RKO's most lucrative ... More Less

Don Hartman's screen credit reads: "Produced, directed and co-written by Don Hartman." According to HR , Barbara Bel Geddes was to star in this picture. Betsy Drake, who made her screen debut in the film, was cast instead. The NYT review notes that Drake met co-star Cary Grant in London while she was acting in the stage play Deep Are the Roots . Grant was "reportedly intrigued by her evident talent and charm," and "when she came home...she went to Hollywood, called Mr. Grant, who arranged a screen test for her...." Modern sources claim that Grant not only supervised a rewrite of Drake's role to include some of her mannerisms, but directed much of the finished film as well. Modern sources also state that Grant instructed Drake to play the part like a young Katharine Hepburn. In its review, Var praised Drake, stating, "In a long part that keeps her within camera range for the full length of the film, Miss Drake's performance is a tour de force in the romantic comedy vein." The NYT review compared Drake favorably to Margaret Sullavan and called her a "refreshingly natural comic spirit" with "considerable promise of more formidable triumphs on the screen." Drake and Grant were married in 1949 and divorced ten years later. They appeared in one more film together, the 1952 picture Room for One More . Actress Lois Hall, who starred in adventure serials in the early 1950s, made her motion picture debut in Every Girl Should Be Married . Modern sources note that the film was RKO's most lucrative production of 1948, making $775,000 in profits. Grant and Drake reprised their roles in a 27 Jun 1949 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Nov 1948.
---
Daily Variety
10 Nov 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
11 Nov 48
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 47
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
21 May 48
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 48
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 48
p. 1, 12
Hollywood Reporter
10 Nov 48
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Dec 48
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Nov 48
p. 4375.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
13 Nov 48
p. 4381.
New York Times
24 Dec 48
p. 14.
Variety
10 Nov 48
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Dore Schary Presentation; Don Hartman's Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Co-wrt
Scr collaboration
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Clothes des by
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Script supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Every Girl Should Be Married" by Eleanor Harris in Ladies' Home Journal (Oct 1947).
MUSIC
"Beyond the Sea," music by Charles Trenet.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 November 1948
Production Date:
late May--21 July 1948
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 December 1948
Copyright Number:
LP2047
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84-85
Length(in feet):
7,609
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13201
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Single salesclerk Anabel Sims yearns to become a devoted wife and mother, but bemoans the social restrictions forced upon women during courtship. While discussing the matter at a soda fountain with her girl friend, Julie Howard, Anabel sees Dr. Madison W. Brown and is immediately taken with him. By coincidence, Anabel meets Madison again when he comes to buy baby booties at Sanford's, the department store where she works. After determining that Madison is a doctor and unmarried, Anabel shows up at his office claiming to be ill, unaware that he is a pediatrician. Although Madison, a confirmed bachelor, discourages her interest in him, Anabel determines to trap the doctor and begins researching his life in detail. Feeling that the only way to win Madison is to make him jealous, Anabel poses as her employer Roger Sanford's secretary and makes a reservation under his name at Pierre's, a restaurant she knows Madison frequents. In an expensive gown she has borrowed from Sanford's dress department, Anabel then coaxes Madison to join her at Roger's table and pretends that she is waiting for her rich lover. Madison is not fooled, however, and demands to know why she is chasing him. After the quick-thinking Anabel claims that she is merely using him to make Roger jealous, Roger unexpectedly arrives. To her relief, Roger, who is an old college friend of Madison's, pretends to know Anabel, and she confesses her entire scheme to him. Roger, a notorious playboy, assumes that Anabel's confession is a ruse to attract him and takes her home. The next day, Anabel, who has been demoted for rejecting Roger's advances, ... +


Single salesclerk Anabel Sims yearns to become a devoted wife and mother, but bemoans the social restrictions forced upon women during courtship. While discussing the matter at a soda fountain with her girl friend, Julie Howard, Anabel sees Dr. Madison W. Brown and is immediately taken with him. By coincidence, Anabel meets Madison again when he comes to buy baby booties at Sanford's, the department store where she works. After determining that Madison is a doctor and unmarried, Anabel shows up at his office claiming to be ill, unaware that he is a pediatrician. Although Madison, a confirmed bachelor, discourages her interest in him, Anabel determines to trap the doctor and begins researching his life in detail. Feeling that the only way to win Madison is to make him jealous, Anabel poses as her employer Roger Sanford's secretary and makes a reservation under his name at Pierre's, a restaurant she knows Madison frequents. In an expensive gown she has borrowed from Sanford's dress department, Anabel then coaxes Madison to join her at Roger's table and pretends that she is waiting for her rich lover. Madison is not fooled, however, and demands to know why she is chasing him. After the quick-thinking Anabel claims that she is merely using him to make Roger jealous, Roger unexpectedly arrives. To her relief, Roger, who is an old college friend of Madison's, pretends to know Anabel, and she confesses her entire scheme to him. Roger, a notorious playboy, assumes that Anabel's confession is a ruse to attract him and takes her home. The next day, Anabel, who has been demoted for rejecting Roger's advances, spies Madison on the street and kisses Roger, who also happens to be walking by, to make him jealous. Madison is unimpressed, but the kiss is captured on film by a photographer and makes headlines the next morning. While Roger accuses Anabel of trying to blackmail him, she condemns him as a womanizer. Later, she is offered a free car from an insurance salesman, who is eager to capitalize on her supposed relation to the store tycoon. Using the situation to her advantage, Anabel finagles a rent-free month in a model house by insinuating that Roger might invest in the development. Madison then hears from his barber, masseur and the clerk who sells him tobacco that, despite the rumors, Anabel is really in love with another man. Seeing through her latest ploy, Madison finds Anabel at the soda fountain and informs her that her maneuvers are failing. Undaunted, Anabel shows up at a lecture given by Madison and, in front of a supportive, all-female crowd, condemns him for selfishly resisting marriage. When his hostile reaction to Anabel's words causes some of his patients to cancel their appointments, a fed-up Madison calls Anabel and arranges to have dinner with her. Although Anabel lovingly prepares Madison's favorite foods, the equally determined Madison tells her that he does not love her and advises her to go back home to Joe, her hometown sweetheart. Anabel is crushed by Madison's defiant rejection and is unprepared for Roger's sudden renewed interest in her. Roger, a three-time divorcé, proposes to Anabel, claiming that her reaction to Madison's rejection has kindled a competitive flame in him. Still dazed, Anabel turns down the proposal, but invites the lovestruck Roger for dinner. Julie then tells Madison that Anabel is running to Roger "on the rebound" and advises him to intervene before Anabel makes a foolish mistake. Although suspicious, Madison shows up at Anabel's and confronts Roger about his "intentions." Before long, Joe suddenly arrives at the house, announcing that he and Anabel are soon marrying. Madison at first rejoices at the news, but later tells Anabel that she should marry Joe only if she truly loves him. After announcing to sincere bumpkin Joe that Anabel pursued him relentlessly, Madison surprises himself by proposing to her. Seeing Anabel's obvious love for the doctor, Joe bids the couple a noble goodbye. As soon as he is out the door, however, Madison reveals that he knows that "Joe" is really radio performer Harry Proctor and praises Anabel for her ingenuity. He then welcomes the minister whom Anabel had summoned in anticipation of her success and sits down to discuss their wedding plans. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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