I Love Trouble (1948)

93 or 96 mins | Film noir | January 1948

Director:

S. Sylvan Simon

Writer:

Roy Huggins

Producer:

S. Sylvan Simon

Cinematographer:

Charles "Bud" Lawton

Editor:

Al Clark

Production Designers:

Stephen Goosson, Carl Anderson

Production Company:

Cornell Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Double Take ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Double Take . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Feb 1948.
---
Harrison's Reports
3 Jan 48
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Jan 48
p. 4018.
Variety
24 Dec 47
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Double Take by Roy Huggins (New York, 1943).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Double Take
Release Date:
January 1948
Production Date:
14 May--19 June 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
28 October 1947
Copyright Number:
LP1315
Duration(in mins):
93 or 96
Length(in feet):
8,586
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When Ralph Johnston, an ambitious politician, receives a series of mysterious notes regarding his wife, he hires private detective Stuart Bailey to investigate her background. Stuart's inquiry leads from Los Angeles to Portland, Oregon, Mrs. Johnston's home town, and he learns that using her maiden name of Jane Breeger, she had worked as a dancer for a nightclub owner name Keller. After Keller and his partner Reno try to dissuade Bailey from continuing his investigation, the detective learns that Mrs. Johnston traveled to Los Angeles with an entertainer named Buster Buffin, who now owns a small café at the beach. Returning to Los Angeles, Bailey questions Buffin, who claims to know nothing of his former partner except that she changed her name to Janie Joy and enrolled in UCLA. Later, Buffin phones Bailey with a promise of more information, but when the detective arrives at the café, he finds that Buffin has been murdered. As he studies Buffin's corpse, Bailey recalls seeing Buffin outside his office building with Mrs. Johnston. Soon after, Bailey is visited by Norma Shannon, who claims to be Janie's sister and asks the detective's help in locating the sister that she has not seen in six years. The mystery deepens when Bailey shows Norma Jane's photograph and she informs him that the woman pictured is not her sister. Although Bailey is suspicious of Norma's motives, he finds himself falling in love with her. Bailey becomes more confused when Martin, a chauffeur employed by the prominent John Vega Caprillo and his glamorous wife, offers him a bribe to drop the investigation. When Bailey questions the Caprillos about the bribe, however, ... +


When Ralph Johnston, an ambitious politician, receives a series of mysterious notes regarding his wife, he hires private detective Stuart Bailey to investigate her background. Stuart's inquiry leads from Los Angeles to Portland, Oregon, Mrs. Johnston's home town, and he learns that using her maiden name of Jane Breeger, she had worked as a dancer for a nightclub owner name Keller. After Keller and his partner Reno try to dissuade Bailey from continuing his investigation, the detective learns that Mrs. Johnston traveled to Los Angeles with an entertainer named Buster Buffin, who now owns a small café at the beach. Returning to Los Angeles, Bailey questions Buffin, who claims to know nothing of his former partner except that she changed her name to Janie Joy and enrolled in UCLA. Later, Buffin phones Bailey with a promise of more information, but when the detective arrives at the café, he finds that Buffin has been murdered. As he studies Buffin's corpse, Bailey recalls seeing Buffin outside his office building with Mrs. Johnston. Soon after, Bailey is visited by Norma Shannon, who claims to be Janie's sister and asks the detective's help in locating the sister that she has not seen in six years. The mystery deepens when Bailey shows Norma Jane's photograph and she informs him that the woman pictured is not her sister. Although Bailey is suspicious of Norma's motives, he finds himself falling in love with her. Bailey becomes more confused when Martin, a chauffeur employed by the prominent John Vega Caprillo and his glamorous wife, offers him a bribe to drop the investigation. When Bailey questions the Caprillos about the bribe, however, they disclaim any knowledge of the offer. Soon after, Bailey receives a mysterious phone call notifying him that Mrs. Johnston has been murdered and that her body can be found under a pier on the beach. Bailey hurries to the pier, and later, when the police find Bailey's monogrammed pen near the corpse, they arrest the detective for murder. On the way to police headquarters, Bailey escapes with the help of his secretary, Hazel Bixby. Upon returning to his house, Bailey finds Mrs. Caprillo waiting to talk to him. Their conversation is interrupted by the appearance of Keller, who identifies Mrs. Caprillo as the real Jane Breeger. Keller then reveals that he had been searching for his missing wife Ellen, who after absconding with $40,000 of his money, assumed the name of Jane Breeger and even used Jane's high school diploma to gain admittance to UCLA before her marriage to Johnston. Piecing together the clues he has gathered, Bailey proves that the murderer is Johnston, who hired Bailey to establish his wife's sordid past, hoping to frighten her into leaving him. When that strategy failed, Johnston murdered her to protect his career. With the case solved, Bailey asks Norma to marry him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.