I Wouldn't Be in Your Shoes (1948)

71 mins | Film noir | 23 May 1948

Director:

William Nigh

Writer:

Steve Fisher

Producer:

Walter Mirisch

Cinematographer:

Mack Stengler

Editor:

Roy Livingston

Production Designer:

David Milton

Production Company:

Monogram Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The viewed print included only the main title and the two stars's credits. All other credits were taken from material in the copyright registry and other contemporary sources. Cornell Woolrich's novel was based on a short story of the same title, which he published under the pseudonym William Irish, in a 1938 issue of Detective Fiction Weekly ... More Less

The viewed print included only the main title and the two stars's credits. All other credits were taken from material in the copyright registry and other contemporary sources. Cornell Woolrich's novel was based on a short story of the same title, which he published under the pseudonym William Irish, in a 1938 issue of Detective Fiction Weekly . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 May 1948.
---
Daily Variety
27 Apr 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 May 48
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jan 48
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 48
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Apr 48
p. 4127.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 May 48
p. 4154.
Variety
5 May 48
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dresser
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd tech
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel I Wouldn't Be in Your Shoes by Cornell Woolrich (New York, 1943).
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 May 1948
Production Date:
late January--early February 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Monogram Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 May 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1708
Duration(in mins):
71
Length(in feet):
6,356
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13057
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Recalling the events that led to his imprisonment, tap dancer Tom J. Quinn thinks back to the hot July night when he and his wife Ann, a dance instructor, were unable to fall asleep: Irritated by the sound of screeching cats, Tom tries to scare the cats away by throwing his only pair of tap dancing shoes out the window. When Tom goes downstairs to retrieve his shoes, he is unable to find them. The following morning, Ann finds the shoes in the apartment hallway, just outside their door, and wonders how they got there. Later that day, police discover the murdered body of wealthy recluse Otis Wantner in a shed near Tom's building. Footprints found on the dead body lead the police to conclude that the killer was a tall dancer, and a team of detectives, led by Inspector Clint Judd, begin a full investigation. Tom later finds a billfold containing $2,000, and when he tells Ann that he intends to turn it over to the police, she urges him to keep the money for a week to see if the loss is reported in the newspapers. The police investigators eventually come to suspect Tom when they match the footprint found on the murdered man with one at the shop where Tom bought his shoes. Instead of arresting Tom right away, Judd waits, hoping that Tom will lead them to the $2,000 that was stolen from Wantner. The detectives finally arrest Tom and Ann when they witness Tom purchase an expensive gift for his wife. During the police interrogation, Tom professes his innocence and refuses to divulge the location of the hidden money. In the hopes that Ann ... +


Recalling the events that led to his imprisonment, tap dancer Tom J. Quinn thinks back to the hot July night when he and his wife Ann, a dance instructor, were unable to fall asleep: Irritated by the sound of screeching cats, Tom tries to scare the cats away by throwing his only pair of tap dancing shoes out the window. When Tom goes downstairs to retrieve his shoes, he is unable to find them. The following morning, Ann finds the shoes in the apartment hallway, just outside their door, and wonders how they got there. Later that day, police discover the murdered body of wealthy recluse Otis Wantner in a shed near Tom's building. Footprints found on the dead body lead the police to conclude that the killer was a tall dancer, and a team of detectives, led by Inspector Clint Judd, begin a full investigation. Tom later finds a billfold containing $2,000, and when he tells Ann that he intends to turn it over to the police, she urges him to keep the money for a week to see if the loss is reported in the newspapers. The police investigators eventually come to suspect Tom when they match the footprint found on the murdered man with one at the shop where Tom bought his shoes. Instead of arresting Tom right away, Judd waits, hoping that Tom will lead them to the $2,000 that was stolen from Wantner. The detectives finally arrest Tom and Ann when they witness Tom purchase an expensive gift for his wife. During the police interrogation, Tom professes his innocence and refuses to divulge the location of the hidden money. In the hopes that Ann will lead them to the money, the police release her and assign a detective to follow her. Tom is eventually charged with murder and robbery, and faces execution. On the basis of the shoeprint evidence, Tom is convicted and sentenced to die in the electric chair. A week before Tom's scheduled execution, Judd, who is romantically obsessed with Ann, offers to help her win the release of her husband. Judd reopens the case and charges John L. Kosloff, a former boarder at Ann and Tom's rooming house, with the murder. Kosloff, however, is released after providing the police with an airtight alibi. As he recalls his last meeting with Ann, Tom comes out of his reverie and prepares for his execution. Ann, meanwhile, begins to suspect that Judd is the killer when he professes his love for her and tells her that he has bought an expensive apartment for her. Moments before Tom's scheduled execution, Judd tells Ann about his long-standing obsession with her, and she tricks him into confessing that he framed Tom in order to be with her. The police investigators, to whom Ann had earlier reported her suspicions, arrive in time to overhear Judd's confession. Judd reaches for his gun when the police try to arrest him and is shot. Tom is exonerated and, after winning his release from prison, is reunited with Ann. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.