June Bride (1948)

96-97 or 106 mins | Romantic comedy | 13 November 1948

Director:

Bretaigne Windust

Producer:

Henry Blanke

Cinematographer:

Ted McCord

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's working title was Feature for June . A 29 Nov 1947 LAT news item notes that Paramount had also considered producing a film based on Eileen Tighe and Graeme Lorimer's play. Tighe was the editor of House and Garden magazine. According to a 10 Dec 1954 HR news item, Tighe planned to make the play, which was never produced, into a musical with music and lyrics by Richard Kayne. This film marked Debbie Reynold's film debut. June Bride was released during the 1948 presidential elections, and according to modern sources, one line, delivered by Mary Wickes, was shot once as "How can I convert this McKinley stinker into a Dewey modern?" and a second time with "Truman" substituted for Dewey. The "Dewey" line was in the released version and when Harry S. Truman was unexpectedly elected president rather than Thomas E. Dewey, a revised reel was rushed to theaters. Bette Davis reprised her role in a 29 Aug 1949 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast, co-starring James Stewart. Irene Dunne and Fred MacMurray starred in a second Lux radio adaptation on 28 Dec 1953, and Marguerite Chapman and Jerome Thor starred in a Lux Video Theatre telecast of the story on 25 Aug ... More Less

The film's working title was Feature for June . A 29 Nov 1947 LAT news item notes that Paramount had also considered producing a film based on Eileen Tighe and Graeme Lorimer's play. Tighe was the editor of House and Garden magazine. According to a 10 Dec 1954 HR news item, Tighe planned to make the play, which was never produced, into a musical with music and lyrics by Richard Kayne. This film marked Debbie Reynold's film debut. June Bride was released during the 1948 presidential elections, and according to modern sources, one line, delivered by Mary Wickes, was shot once as "How can I convert this McKinley stinker into a Dewey modern?" and a second time with "Truman" substituted for Dewey. The "Dewey" line was in the released version and when Harry S. Truman was unexpectedly elected president rather than Thomas E. Dewey, a revised reel was rushed to theaters. Bette Davis reprised her role in a 29 Aug 1949 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast, co-starring James Stewart. Irene Dunne and Fred MacMurray starred in a second Lux radio adaptation on 28 Dec 1953, and Marguerite Chapman and Jerome Thor starred in a Lux Video Theatre telecast of the story on 25 Aug 1955. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Oct 1948.
---
Daily Variety
10 Sep 48
p. 3, 9
Film Daily
19 Oct 48
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 38
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 38
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 48
p. 5, 10
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1954.
---
Los Angeles Times
29 Nov 1947.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Oct 48
p. 4335.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Oct 48
p. 4357.
New York Times
30 Oct 48
p. 10.
Variety
20 Oct 48
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Bette Davis' ward by
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff dir
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Feature for June by Eileen Tighe, Sarah Lorimer and Graeme Lorimer (copyrighted 15 Aug 1944).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Feature for June
Release Date:
13 November 1948
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 30 October 1948
Production Date:
early May--late July 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 November 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1941
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
96-97 or 106
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When foreign correspondent Carey Jackson returns to New York, he learns that his newspaper's Vienna office is being closed and that he is out of a job. The magazine's managing editor, Carleton Towne, offers him a substitute job on Home Life , a women's magazine owned by the same company, but Carey is not interested until he discovers that he would be working for editor Linda Gilman, with whom he was once in love. When Carey breaks the news to Linda, however, she refuses to hire him because she is still angry at him for leaving her three years earlier. They agree to talk matters over at dinner, and later, Carey unsuccessfully tries to rekindle their romance. Linda finally agrees to hire Carey on the condition that he will not think of her as a woman. The next morning, Carey and Linda leave for the Brinker home in Crestville, Indiana, where they are to set up a feature on the wedding of Jeanne Brinker, the eldest daughter, to Bud Mitchell. Although the feature will run in June, the magazine's deadline dictates that the wedding take place in March, so Linda's staff follows Carey and Linda a few days later to modernize the Mckinley-era decor of the Brinker house and make over the Brinkers, as well. Linda wants Carey to write a simple story of young love, but Carey keeps looking for an "angle." He believes that he has found it when he talks to Barbara, the younger daughter, who is known as Boo. Boo reveals that she has always been in love with Bud, but when Jeanne's former boyfriend Jim, ... +


When foreign correspondent Carey Jackson returns to New York, he learns that his newspaper's Vienna office is being closed and that he is out of a job. The magazine's managing editor, Carleton Towne, offers him a substitute job on Home Life , a women's magazine owned by the same company, but Carey is not interested until he discovers that he would be working for editor Linda Gilman, with whom he was once in love. When Carey breaks the news to Linda, however, she refuses to hire him because she is still angry at him for leaving her three years earlier. They agree to talk matters over at dinner, and later, Carey unsuccessfully tries to rekindle their romance. Linda finally agrees to hire Carey on the condition that he will not think of her as a woman. The next morning, Carey and Linda leave for the Brinker home in Crestville, Indiana, where they are to set up a feature on the wedding of Jeanne Brinker, the eldest daughter, to Bud Mitchell. Although the feature will run in June, the magazine's deadline dictates that the wedding take place in March, so Linda's staff follows Carey and Linda a few days later to modernize the Mckinley-era decor of the Brinker house and make over the Brinkers, as well. Linda wants Carey to write a simple story of young love, but Carey keeps looking for an "angle." He believes that he has found it when he talks to Barbara, the younger daughter, who is known as Boo. Boo reveals that she has always been in love with Bud, but when Jeanne's former boyfriend Jim, Bud's older brother, joined the Army, Jeanne, who cannot stand to be without a man, made a play for Bud and is now going to marry him. Carey suggests that they ask an officer whom he knows to order Jim home for the wedding, but then thinks better of it, knowing that Linda will fire him if the wedding does not take place. Boo, however, secretly telephones Carey's friend and arranges for Jim to come home. Meanwhile, Carey gets extremely drunk on Mr. Brinker's cider, and during a sleigh ride, reconciles with Linda. When Jim arrives, an astonished Carey tries to get rid of him, but unaware of Boo's manipulations, Linda intervenes. Once they are back together, Jim and Jeanne elope. Carey tries to convince Linda that she now has an even better story, but before he can tell her about Boo and Bud, she fires him and adds that their relationship is also finished. When Boo complains to Carey that Bud still thinks of her as a little girl, he advises her to have the magazine's dress designer, Paula Winthrop, fit one of Jeanne's dresses on her. Carey then pretends to be interested in Boo in order to make Bud jealous, and soon Bud proposes to Boo. Having written their story, Carey returns to New York. In the excitement of the new wedding, Linda does not notice his departure, and when she later reads his story, she understands that he always knew the truth about the two couples. After the June issue is mocked up, Linda gives Towne her notice and then announces that she plans to go after Carey, not realizing that he is sitting in Towne's office and has heard every word. The couple is reconciled when Linda offers to follow Carey to Europe, toting his suitcases. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.