The Man from Colorado (1948)

99 mins | Western | December 1948

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HISTORY

A Jan 1947 HR news item indicates that Edmund Goulding worked on this film's screenplay for two weeks but left the picture due to a "difference of opinion" with producer Jules Schermer. The extent of Goulding's contribution to the final film has not been determined. Charles Vidor directed the first three weeks of filming, but was replaced by Harry Levin following a dispute with Columbia production executive Harry Cohn. The feud was viewed by many as an extension of a dispute that began in 1946, when Vidor sued Columbia for termination of his contract, and when Columbia responded with a countersuit. In a public statement issued by Columbia and printed in HR in Mar 1947, the studio said that it was "dissatisfied with the progress being made with Mr. Vidor in the shooting of the picture." Vidor responded to the studio's charges by stating that he had been given a mere 48-day shooting schedule, and that "such a picture could not be made in under 75 days." Vidor also stated that Columbia deliberately cast Glenn Ford in the picture knowing that animosity existed betweeen the two men since Ford testified as a character witness against Vidor in Columbia's 1946 countersuit. The legal matter remained unresolved for over three years. During that period, Vidor formed an independent production unit, The Beckworth Corp., but made only one film, The Loves of Carmen (see above). In 1949, when Vidor refused to direct The Petty Girl (see above), Columbia suspended him and sued him for breach of contract. On 17 Oct 1949, the day that ... More Less

A Jan 1947 HR news item indicates that Edmund Goulding worked on this film's screenplay for two weeks but left the picture due to a "difference of opinion" with producer Jules Schermer. The extent of Goulding's contribution to the final film has not been determined. Charles Vidor directed the first three weeks of filming, but was replaced by Harry Levin following a dispute with Columbia production executive Harry Cohn. The feud was viewed by many as an extension of a dispute that began in 1946, when Vidor sued Columbia for termination of his contract, and when Columbia responded with a countersuit. In a public statement issued by Columbia and printed in HR in Mar 1947, the studio said that it was "dissatisfied with the progress being made with Mr. Vidor in the shooting of the picture." Vidor responded to the studio's charges by stating that he had been given a mere 48-day shooting schedule, and that "such a picture could not be made in under 75 days." Vidor also stated that Columbia deliberately cast Glenn Ford in the picture knowing that animosity existed betweeen the two men since Ford testified as a character witness against Vidor in Columbia's 1946 countersuit. The legal matter remained unresolved for over three years. During that period, Vidor formed an independent production unit, The Beckworth Corp., but made only one film, The Loves of Carmen (see above). In 1949, when Vidor refused to direct The Petty Girl (see above), Columbia suspended him and sued him for breach of contract. On 17 Oct 1949, the day that Columbia's suit against Vidor was to go to trial, DV reported that a settlement had been brokered by M-G-M production chief Louis B. Mayer. Mayer reportedly intervened in the dispute in order to "avert a repetition of the name-calling and black headlines that marked the last Columbia-Vidor court fight." In exchange for the abrogation of his contract with Columbia, Vidor agreed to pay the studio $15,000 a year for five years.
       A Feb 1947 news item in LAEx noted that Melvyn Douglas was set as Ford's co-star. According to a May 1947 HR news item, an explosion and fire destroyed part of the film's Jay Corrigan Ranch location set in Simi Valley, CA, and resulted in the hospitalization of bit actress Helen M. Gereghty. Gereghty's participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Columbia borrowed William Holden from Paramount for the production. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20 Nov 1948.
---
Daily Variety
18 Nov 48
p. 3, 9
Daily Variety
6 Sep 49
p. 8.
Daily Variety
17 Oct 49
p. 1.
Film Daily
18 Nov 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 46
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jan 47
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 47
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 47
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 47
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 48
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jan 49
p. 6.
Los Angeles Examiner
5 Feb 1947.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Feb 1947.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
20 Nov 48
p. 4390.
New York Times
21 Jan 49
p. 24.
Variety
24 Nov 48
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2nd unit dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col dir
DETAILS
Release Date:
December 1948
Production Date:
24 February--26 May 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 May 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1615
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
99
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Colorado, during the waning days of the American Civil War, a trigger-happy Union colonel, Owen Devereaux, orders his troops to attack a surrendering Confederate force at Jacob's Gorge. The unprecipitated attack is brutal and continues until Devereaux's unit decimates the Confederates, killing more than one hundered soldiers. Following the battle, Devereaux's second in command, Captain Del Stewart, discovers that the Confederates had signalled their surrender before the battle commenced. Later, following an announcement that the war has ended, Devereaux writes in his diary that the war made him "crazy" and that he could not stop himself from ordering the attack. The colonel's erratic behavior continues when he orders the arrest of one of his soldiers, Sgt. Jericho Howard, who was merely caught celebrating the end of the war. In his hometown, Devereaux is greeted with a hero's welcome and a parade proclaiming him "The Man from Colorado." Things appear to look up for Devereaux as he is reunited with his sweetheart, Caroline Emmett, and appointed to serve as a Federal judge. However, the colonel's troubled thoughts begin to consume him once again as he becomes jealous of Caroline's affections for Del. During a celebration for Devereaux, a Confederate soldier who survived the battle against Devereaux's regiment confronts the colonel at gunpoint and demands an explanation for his order to fire upon the surrendering army unit. Del and Doc, the town doctor, both witness Devereaux's angry reaction, in which the colonel beats the soldier and then shoots him dead. After Devereaux is sworn in as judge, he appoints Del as his Federal Marshal and assigns him to tend to Corporal Dixon, who, it has ... +


In Colorado, during the waning days of the American Civil War, a trigger-happy Union colonel, Owen Devereaux, orders his troops to attack a surrendering Confederate force at Jacob's Gorge. The unprecipitated attack is brutal and continues until Devereaux's unit decimates the Confederates, killing more than one hundered soldiers. Following the battle, Devereaux's second in command, Captain Del Stewart, discovers that the Confederates had signalled their surrender before the battle commenced. Later, following an announcement that the war has ended, Devereaux writes in his diary that the war made him "crazy" and that he could not stop himself from ordering the attack. The colonel's erratic behavior continues when he orders the arrest of one of his soldiers, Sgt. Jericho Howard, who was merely caught celebrating the end of the war. In his hometown, Devereaux is greeted with a hero's welcome and a parade proclaiming him "The Man from Colorado." Things appear to look up for Devereaux as he is reunited with his sweetheart, Caroline Emmett, and appointed to serve as a Federal judge. However, the colonel's troubled thoughts begin to consume him once again as he becomes jealous of Caroline's affections for Del. During a celebration for Devereaux, a Confederate soldier who survived the battle against Devereaux's regiment confronts the colonel at gunpoint and demands an explanation for his order to fire upon the surrendering army unit. Del and Doc, the town doctor, both witness Devereaux's angry reaction, in which the colonel beats the soldier and then shoots him dead. After Devereaux is sworn in as judge, he appoints Del as his Federal Marshal and assigns him to tend to Corporal Dixon, who, it has just been learned, has been pistol-whipped by a gang working for Big Ed Carter. During the war, Carter, the owner of the Great Star Mining Company, laid claim to land belonging to many of the absent soldiers, and is now using strong-arm tactics to keep the land. When Devereaux tells Del that he intends to marry Caroline, Del expresses his concern that he is mentally too "sick" to marry her, and Devereaux responds by striking Del. Jericho, meanwhile, has escaped from his detention and has formed a gang to rob the Great Star's safe. During the robbery, Jericho is shot in the hand, and his gun, bearing the inscription "J. Howard," is left behind. Jericho's brother Johnny is arrested for the theft, and although Del convinces Jericho to confess his guilt to save his brother, Jericho arrives too late to prevent Devereaux's execution of Johnny. The execution infuriates Del, who vows to "finish" the colonel. After escaping from a trap set by Devereaux, Del goes into hiding with Caroline, who married Devereaux, but has the diary and now fears him. Determined to find Del, Devereaux sets fire to the entire town to drive him out of hiding. Del finally emerges from a burning building, and Devereaux is about to shoot him when a building facade collapses on the colonel and kills him. Del and Caroline survive the fire, and Del leaves for Washington to take a new job. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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