My Dear Secretary (1948)

94 mins | Romantic comedy | 5 November 1948

Director:

Charles Martin

Writer:

Charles Martin

Producer:

Leo C. Popkin

Cinematographer:

Joseph Biroc

Editor:

Arthur H. Nadel

Production Company:

Cardinal Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

Charles Martin's onscreen credit reads "Written and directed by Charles Martin," and Rudi Feld's onscreen credit reads "Production designed by Rudi Feld, Art Director." The film was the initial producing effort of Harry M. Popkin for United Artists release. As reported in HR on 18 Feb 1948, when Popkin first bought the rights to the story--for $100,000--the film adaptation was scheduled for a Twentieth Century-Fox release. Although the film was previewed at a length of 83 minutes, it was released at 94 minutes. In Jul 1953, HR announced that the film would be re-issued by Beverly ... More Less

Charles Martin's onscreen credit reads "Written and directed by Charles Martin," and Rudi Feld's onscreen credit reads "Production designed by Rudi Feld, Art Director." The film was the initial producing effort of Harry M. Popkin for United Artists release. As reported in HR on 18 Feb 1948, when Popkin first bought the rights to the story--for $100,000--the film adaptation was scheduled for a Twentieth Century-Fox release. Although the film was previewed at a length of 83 minutes, it was released at 94 minutes. In Jul 1953, HR announced that the film would be re-issued by Beverly Pictures. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Sep 1948.
---
Daily Variety
7 Sep 48
p. 3.
Film Daily
8 Sep 48
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Sep 48
p. 3, 8
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1948.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 48
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jun 48
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 49
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 1953.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Jan 1949.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
4 Sep 48
p. 4303.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Sep 48
p. 4309.
New York Times
14 Feb 49
p. 15.
Variety
8 Sep 48
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Harry M. Popkin Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des by
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost dir
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
SOUND
Rec dir
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst prod mgr
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 November 1948
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 12 January 1949
Production Date:
early May--early June 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Cardinal Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 November 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1899
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
94
Length(in feet):
8
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13279
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While giving a lecture at a night school, best-selling romance novelist Owen Waterbury meets aspiring writer Stephanie Gaylord, who is called "Steve," and asks her to become his secretary. Steve immediately quits her job of five years with publisher Charles Harris, who is in love with her, and reports promptly to Owen, only to discover that, unlike the serious, sensitive man she fell in love with while reading his novel, Owen is a gambling playboy and spendthrift. He buys minks as bonuses for his string of pretty secretaries and spends his days at the racetrack with Ronnie Hastings, his ne'er-do-well neighbor. Ronnie's endless wisecracks and bad cooking, and spontaneous visits from their eccentric widowed landlady, Mrs. Reeves, keep Owen's concentration in constant chaos. After spontaneous trips with Owen and Ronnie to the racetrack and to Las Vegas, Steve finally takes dictation for Owen at a beachhouse. Owen outlines a story in which the novel-writing protagonist is in love with his secretary, then kisses Steve, who quits. Steve hires a detective to follow her, then at a nightclub, where she is dining with Charles, asks her to dance and proposes. They elope to Las Vegas that night, and after she learns that he has spent $20,000 in advanced royalties from his next novel, they go to a mountain retreat to write. Four months later, Owen's publisher, Fulton, rejects the novel out of jealousy over his wife, Birdie, who used to be Owen's secretary. Owen now believes that having a wife as a secretary has proved too great a distraction for his writing, and fires her. Steve goes to Harris with a copy ... +


While giving a lecture at a night school, best-selling romance novelist Owen Waterbury meets aspiring writer Stephanie Gaylord, who is called "Steve," and asks her to become his secretary. Steve immediately quits her job of five years with publisher Charles Harris, who is in love with her, and reports promptly to Owen, only to discover that, unlike the serious, sensitive man she fell in love with while reading his novel, Owen is a gambling playboy and spendthrift. He buys minks as bonuses for his string of pretty secretaries and spends his days at the racetrack with Ronnie Hastings, his ne'er-do-well neighbor. Ronnie's endless wisecracks and bad cooking, and spontaneous visits from their eccentric widowed landlady, Mrs. Reeves, keep Owen's concentration in constant chaos. After spontaneous trips with Owen and Ronnie to the racetrack and to Las Vegas, Steve finally takes dictation for Owen at a beachhouse. Owen outlines a story in which the novel-writing protagonist is in love with his secretary, then kisses Steve, who quits. Steve hires a detective to follow her, then at a nightclub, where she is dining with Charles, asks her to dance and proposes. They elope to Las Vegas that night, and after she learns that he has spent $20,000 in advanced royalties from his next novel, they go to a mountain retreat to write. Four months later, Owen's publisher, Fulton, rejects the novel out of jealousy over his wife, Birdie, who used to be Owen's secretary. Owen now believes that having a wife as a secretary has proved too great a distraction for his writing, and fires her. Steve goes to Harris with a copy of Owen's manuscript, as well as a manuscript of her own first novel, which Owen has neglected to read. Owen later accuses Steve of having an affair with Charles, unaware that he preferred Steve's novel to Owen's, and that she turned down an offer to be published in order to spare Owen's ego. When Owen confronts Charles, Elsie, an ex-secretary of Owen who now works for Charles, tells him that she is going to marry Charles, and that Steve sacrificed her career to save her marriage. The Waterburys separate, and Steve becomes a prize-winning author. After being served divorce papers, Owen finds Steve living upstairs and walks in on her as she is interviewing a male secretary. Owen finally admits to his wife that she is the better writer, then offers to take dictation for her. She wryly dictates the story of a secretary who meets an egotistical novelist in need of a psychiatrist. When Owen asks if the secretary loves the writer, she answers, "of course." Ronnie then enters with Mrs. Reeves--his new wife--and Owen and Steve kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.