You Were Meant for Me (1948)

91 mins | Musical | February 1948

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Producer:

Fred Kohlmar

Cinematographer:

Victor Milner

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Richard Irvine

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

This film's working titles were The Flapper Age and The Flaming Age . A contemporary source lists Kenny Williams as a dance director and credits George Leverett instead of E. Clayton Ward as a sound recorder. According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in May 1948 Famous Records of Newark, NJ, sued the studio for stating in the film that a Famous Records company had gone bankrupt. The Newark company sought $150,000 in damages and withdrawal of the film. The suit was settled in Sep 1949 with Famous Records receiving $350. You Were Meant for Me was shot after but released before Dan Dailey's Give My Regards to Broadway in an apparent attempt to capitalize on the success of Jeanne Crain's Margie and Dailey's Mother Wore Tights , which were both period musicals (see entries above). You Were Meant for Me marked Crain's return to the studio after an eighteen-month maternity leave. Dan Dailey reprised his role in a 28 Jun 1948 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast, co-starring Donna Reed. You Were Meant for Me is a partial, uncredited remake of the 1942 Twentieth Century-Fox production Orchestra Wives (see ... More Less

This film's working titles were The Flapper Age and The Flaming Age . A contemporary source lists Kenny Williams as a dance director and credits George Leverett instead of E. Clayton Ward as a sound recorder. According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, in May 1948 Famous Records of Newark, NJ, sued the studio for stating in the film that a Famous Records company had gone bankrupt. The Newark company sought $150,000 in damages and withdrawal of the film. The suit was settled in Sep 1949 with Famous Records receiving $350. You Were Meant for Me was shot after but released before Dan Dailey's Give My Regards to Broadway in an apparent attempt to capitalize on the success of Jeanne Crain's Margie and Dailey's Mother Wore Tights , which were both period musicals (see entries above). You Were Meant for Me marked Crain's return to the studio after an eighteen-month maternity leave. Dan Dailey reprised his role in a 28 Jun 1948 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast, co-starring Donna Reed. You Were Meant for Me is a partial, uncredited remake of the 1942 Twentieth Century-Fox production Orchestra Wives (see above). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Jan 1948.
---
Daily Variety
16 Jan 48
p. 3, 10
Down Beat
11 Feb 48
p. 8.
Film Daily
20 Jan 48
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 47
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 47
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 48
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 48
p. 6, 11
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Jan 48
pp. 4029-30.
New York Times
29 Jan 48
p. 27.
Variety
21 Jan 48
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward dir
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
Orch arr
Orch arr
Orch arr
Orch arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Dances created and staged by
Dances created and staged by
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
STAND INS
Clarinet double for Dan Dailey
Trumpet double for Dan Dailey
Trombone double for Dan Dailey
SOURCES
MUSIC
Concerto in F by George Gershwin
"Happy Days Are Here Again," music by Milton Ager
"Lilacs in the Rain" by Peter De Rose.
SONGS
"You Were Meant for Me," music by Nacio Herb Brown, lyrics by Arthur Freed
"If I Had You," music and lyrics by Ted Shapiro, Jimmy Campbell and Reginald Connelly
"Can't Sleep a Wink," music and lyrics by Charles Henderson
+
SONGS
"You Were Meant for Me," music by Nacio Herb Brown, lyrics by Arthur Freed
"If I Had You," music and lyrics by Ted Shapiro, Jimmy Campbell and Reginald Connelly
"Can't Sleep a Wink," music and lyrics by Charles Henderson
"Crazy Rhythm," music by Joseph Meyer and Roger Wolfe Kahn, lyrics by Irving Caesar
"I'll Get By," music by Fred E. Ahlert, lyrics by Roy Turk
"Good Night, Sweetheart," music and lyrics by Ray Noble, Jimmy Campbell and Reginald Connelly
"Ain't Misbehavin'," music by Thomas "Fats" Waller and Harry Brooks, lyrics by Andy Razaf
"Ain't She Sweet?" music by Milton Ager, lyrics by Jack Yellen.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Flapper Age
The Flaming Age
Release Date:
February 1948
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 16 January 1948
Production Date:
mid September--late October 1947
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 January 1948
Copyright Number:
LP1779
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
91
Length(in feet):
8,222
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12668
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1929, in Bloomington, Illinois, Peggy Mayhew, her escort Roy and friends Louise Crane and Eddie go to a dance at the Electric Gardens where Chuck Arnold and His Sophisticates are appearing. Peggy is stunned by Chuck's versatility; he sings, plays trumpet, clarinet and trombone, as well as leading the band. Peggy wins a lucky number drawing, and when the prizes are presented by Chuck, she instantly falls in love with him, kissing him in front of all the dancers. Later, Chuck invites Peggy to come to Peoria, where the band will be playing the next evening. Peggy's parents, Andrew and Cora Mayhew, tell her at dinner the following evening that the whole town is talking about her behavior at the dance. Ignoring her parents' admonitions, Peggy sneaks out and takes a bus to Peoria, but is denied admission to the dance as she is unescorted. She spots Chuck's manager, Oscar, and asks him to take a note to Chuck, but Oscar later tears it up to protect Peggy from engaging in a one-night stand with the musician. She waits until the dance is over to meet Chuck, and after she misses her bus home, she accepts his offer to ride home in the band bus. The next morning, Mrs. Mayhew finds Peggy and Chuck asleep on her sofa, and is shocked when they wake up and announce that they were married a few hours ago. Peggy goes on the road with Chuck and the band. The band does well in the Midwest, and Chuck tells Peggy that they have been booked into the Pennsylvania Hotel in New York. Peggy shows him the Variety headline, "Wall St. ... +


In 1929, in Bloomington, Illinois, Peggy Mayhew, her escort Roy and friends Louise Crane and Eddie go to a dance at the Electric Gardens where Chuck Arnold and His Sophisticates are appearing. Peggy is stunned by Chuck's versatility; he sings, plays trumpet, clarinet and trombone, as well as leading the band. Peggy wins a lucky number drawing, and when the prizes are presented by Chuck, she instantly falls in love with him, kissing him in front of all the dancers. Later, Chuck invites Peggy to come to Peoria, where the band will be playing the next evening. Peggy's parents, Andrew and Cora Mayhew, tell her at dinner the following evening that the whole town is talking about her behavior at the dance. Ignoring her parents' admonitions, Peggy sneaks out and takes a bus to Peoria, but is denied admission to the dance as she is unescorted. She spots Chuck's manager, Oscar, and asks him to take a note to Chuck, but Oscar later tears it up to protect Peggy from engaging in a one-night stand with the musician. She waits until the dance is over to meet Chuck, and after she misses her bus home, she accepts his offer to ride home in the band bus. The next morning, Mrs. Mayhew finds Peggy and Chuck asleep on her sofa, and is shocked when they wake up and announce that they were married a few hours ago. Peggy goes on the road with Chuck and the band. The band does well in the Midwest, and Chuck tells Peggy that they have been booked into the Pennsylvania Hotel in New York. Peggy shows him the Variety headline, "Wall St. Lays An Egg," but he dismisses this as just a little flurry in the market. After he fails to keep a dinner date because he is auditioning a new song, Chuck finds Peggy sobbing, upset because he is always immersed in his music. Chuck promises her that when they get to New York things will be a lot better. However, Oscar brings Chuck a telegram which states that their New York engagement has been canceled. Hurt by the stock market crash, the tour falls apart, forcing Peggy and Chuck to return to Bloomington to stay with her parents. When Peggy meets some of her old friends at the drug store, where one of the recordings Chuck and the band made is being played, Chuck and Peggy pretend to be "flush." Peggy is particularly concerned about Chuck's nonchalant approach to money, and friction develops between Peggy and her mother over Chuck's unwillingness to work. The company for which the band has recorded then goes bankrupt, so there will be no more royalty checks to help support them. Peggy learns that she is pregnant and, while filling a prescription at the drug store, sees Louise and the others, who make fun of the fact that none of the major bookings Chuck has been boasting about have materialized. After Peggy's father, who has been forced to lay off men from the brick works he owns, puts himself back on the production line, Oscar telegrams that he has a booking for the band at a vaudeville theater in Chicago. Peggy wants Chuck to accept but the prideful Chuck refuses. Fed up, Peggy accuses Chuck of sponging off her family, and Chuck packs and heads for the railroad station. As Peggy's mother comforts her, Oscar arrives looking for Chuck, and Peggy tells him what has happened. That night Mr. Mayhew returns home from the brick works and brings along a new employee--Chuck--and Peggy, Chuck and Oscar are reunited. Three years later, the economy has picked up and Oscar is vice-president in charge of sales at the Mayhew brick works. In New York, Peggy, Louise and Eddie enjoy watching Chuck and the band play during their successful engagement at the Pennsylvania Hotel. Peggy and Chuck and their three-year-old son now have a bright future ahead of them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.