Adventure in Baltimore (1949)

89 mins | Drama | 19 April 1949

Director:

Richard Wallace

Writer:

Lionel Houser

Producer:

Richard H. Berger

Cinematographer:

Robert de Grasse

Editor:

Robert Swink

Production Designers:

Albert D'Agostino, Jack Okey

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Baltimore Escapade and Pittsburgh Escapade. The film opens with a comic voice-over narration and includes brief scenes showing Shirley Temple as a typical "American school girl" in 1948, 1925 and 1913, respectively. According to HR news items, John Cromwell was to direct the picture, but because of disagreements with RKO over the screenplay, he was replaced by Richard Wallace. HR also noted that Barbara Bel Geddes was to star in the film, but was replaced by Temple after complaining about appearing in another period piece (her previous screen role was in RKO's 1948 film I Remember Mama). A NYT item announced that Melvyn Douglas was to play opposite Bel Geddes.
       According to an item in LAEx, the portrait of "Tom" seen in the film was painted by artist James Korn, who also coached Temple for her painting scenes. Temple and co-star John Agar were married at the time of production and were both borrowed from David O. Selznick's company. Adventure in Baltimore was the second and last picture the couple, who divorced shortly after this film, made together. It was also one of the last films that production executive Dore Schary worked on before leaving RKO because of differences with new owner Howard Hughes. Modern sources note that the picture lost $785,000 at the box office. ...

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The working titles of this film were Baltimore Escapade and Pittsburgh Escapade. The film opens with a comic voice-over narration and includes brief scenes showing Shirley Temple as a typical "American school girl" in 1948, 1925 and 1913, respectively. According to HR news items, John Cromwell was to direct the picture, but because of disagreements with RKO over the screenplay, he was replaced by Richard Wallace. HR also noted that Barbara Bel Geddes was to star in the film, but was replaced by Temple after complaining about appearing in another period piece (her previous screen role was in RKO's 1948 film I Remember Mama). A NYT item announced that Melvyn Douglas was to play opposite Bel Geddes.
       According to an item in LAEx, the portrait of "Tom" seen in the film was painted by artist James Korn, who also coached Temple for her painting scenes. Temple and co-star John Agar were married at the time of production and were both borrowed from David O. Selznick's company. Adventure in Baltimore was the second and last picture the couple, who divorced shortly after this film, made together. It was also one of the last films that production executive Dore Schary worked on before leaving RKO because of differences with new owner Howard Hughes. Modern sources note that the picture lost $785,000 at the box office.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
26 Mar 1949
---
Daily Variety
22 Mar 1949
p. 3
Film Daily
28 Mar 1949
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 1947
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 1948
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 1948
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1948
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 1948
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jun 1948
p. 15
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1948
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 1949
p. 3
Los Angeles Examiner
9 Jul 1948
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
26 Mar 1949
---
New York Times
22 Nov 1947
---
New York Times
29 Apr 1949
p. 27
Variety
23 Mar 1949
p. 8
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Miss Temple and Mr. Agar Appear by Arrangement with David O. Selznick
Dorothy Vaughn
Freddie Santley
Tom Kelly
Sam Shack
Ralph Volke
Bill Self
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Dore Schary Presentation
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
Albert S. D'Agostino
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
C. Bakaleinikoff
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Dance dir
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Ed Killy
Unit mgr
Shirley Temple's art coach
Dan Ullman
Scr supv
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Baltimore Escapade
Pittsburgh Escapade
Release Date:
19 April 1949
Production Date:
late May--mid Jul 1948
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
14 April 1949
LP2281
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
89
Length(in feet):
8,041
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13220
SYNOPSIS

In 1905, Dinah Sheldon, an enthusiastic art student, is expelled from Miss Ingram's Seminary for wearing two petticoats instead of five, attending political rallies and insisting that she be allowed to study nudes. When she is sent home to Baltimore, Dinah's understanding father, Dr. Andrew Sheldon, an Episcopalian pastor, easily forgives his headstrong daughter this latest calamity, but her mother Lily encourages her to be more conventionally feminine. Dinah's childhood sweetheart, Tom Wade, also believes that she should settle down and confesses that, since her absence, he has begun dating the more "continental" Bernice Eckert. Dinah feigns indifference to Bernice, telling Tom that her only ambition is to study art in Paris, and he agrees to help her fulfill her dream. When Dinah is arrested during a brawl in a public park, which starts after four loafers begin arguing over one of her paintings, the overworked Tom is asked to provide bail for all five. Out of gratitude, Dinah offers to write a speech for Tom on equality, which he is scheduled to deliver the next night at the Forum Society's Spring Dance. While preparing the speech, which is a modified version of one of her own debates, Dinah learns that her exit from jail was witnessed by two women, who then relayed the information to Dan Fletcher, Andrew's Scottish vestryman. Dan is upset by the scandal because Andrew has just become a candidate for the new bishop's post, and suggests that he punish Dinah. Instead, the less ambitious Andrew encourages Dinah's dreams by confessing that, as a youth, he had a short career as a ballroom dancer but gave it up to protect his ...

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In 1905, Dinah Sheldon, an enthusiastic art student, is expelled from Miss Ingram's Seminary for wearing two petticoats instead of five, attending political rallies and insisting that she be allowed to study nudes. When she is sent home to Baltimore, Dinah's understanding father, Dr. Andrew Sheldon, an Episcopalian pastor, easily forgives his headstrong daughter this latest calamity, but her mother Lily encourages her to be more conventionally feminine. Dinah's childhood sweetheart, Tom Wade, also believes that she should settle down and confesses that, since her absence, he has begun dating the more "continental" Bernice Eckert. Dinah feigns indifference to Bernice, telling Tom that her only ambition is to study art in Paris, and he agrees to help her fulfill her dream. When Dinah is arrested during a brawl in a public park, which starts after four loafers begin arguing over one of her paintings, the overworked Tom is asked to provide bail for all five. Out of gratitude, Dinah offers to write a speech for Tom on equality, which he is scheduled to deliver the next night at the Forum Society's Spring Dance. While preparing the speech, which is a modified version of one of her own debates, Dinah learns that her exit from jail was witnessed by two women, who then relayed the information to Dan Fletcher, Andrew's Scottish vestryman. Dan is upset by the scandal because Andrew has just become a candidate for the new bishop's post, and suggests that he punish Dinah. Instead, the less ambitious Andrew encourages Dinah's dreams by confessing that, as a youth, he had a short career as a ballroom dancer but gave it up to protect his father's reputation. That night, Dinah shows up late at the Forum Society, and Tom is forced to read her speech cold. He is shocked to discover that her "equality" topic is female emancipation and is laughed at by the large crowd. The humiliated Tom dotes on Bernice and informs Dinah that he no longer wants to be seen with her. Aware of Tom's rejection, Andrew offers to be Dinah's partner in a waltz contest, and father and daughter easily defeat Tom and Bernice. Later, Dinah visits Tom at the automobile garage where he works as a mechanic and begs him to pose for a portrait she intends to enter in a competition called "Spirit of Labor." Although Tom at first refuses to help, Dinah soon talks him into posing by promising to disguise his face in the finished painting. She then dresses him in a bathing suit and hammer and paints his likeness in the seclusion of the family greenhouse. Dinah enters the painting in the contest anonymously, but because Tom's face is clearly identifiable, her identity is soon surmised. In addition, because she painted Tom as half undressed, her reputation is called into question, and Andrew, who has been nominated to the bishop's job, is suddenly embroiled in yet another scandal. Tom is then fired from his job and dumped by a jealous Bernice. Pressured by Lily and Dan, Andrew reluctantly agrees to send Dinah to her aunt in Pittsburgh until his promotion is assured. Tom, meanwhile, finds himself hotly defending Dinah's honor to Bernice, and as the contrite Dinah is about to leave for the train station, he insists on riding with her in the family carriage. On the way there, a suffrage parade is harassed by a group of jeering men, and Dinah and Lily come to the women's rescue, causing a small riot. Just as a regretful Andrew is about to rush to the station to bring Dinah home, he learns of the incident and bails his family and Tom out of jail. The next day in church, Andrew tells Dan he has been "ruminating" about his future and delivers a critical, impromptu sermon on tolerance to his congregation. Andrew's stand moves his family to tears, and just as Tom finally confesses his love to Dinah, Andrew learns that he has been made bishop.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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