Flaxy Martin (1949)

86 mins | Drama | 12 February 1949

Director:

Richard Bare

Writer:

David Lang

Producer:

Saul Elkins

Cinematographer:

Carl Guthrie

Editor:

Frank Magee

Production Designer:

Ted Smith

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's working title was Smart Money. ...

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The film's working title was Smart Money.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Jan 1949
---
Daily Variety
18 Jan 1949
p. 3
Film Daily
19 Jan 1949
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
23 Apr 1948
p. 19
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 1949
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1949
p. 17
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Jan 1949
p. 4469
Variety
19 Jan 1949
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
Asst cam
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Lyle B. Reifsnider
Set dec
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff dir
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Don Page
Unit mgr
Irva Mae Ross
Scr supv
Best boy
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Smart Money
Release Date:
12 February 1949
Production Date:
mid Apr--mid May 1948
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
12 February 1949
LP2108
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
86
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

After Caesar, one of gangster Hap Richie's henchmen, commits a murder, Hap orders his lawyer, Walter Colby, to obtain Caesar's release from jail. Tired of defending criminals, Walt wants to leave Hap's organization, and to prevent this, Hap recruits singer Flaxy Martin, with whom Walt is in love. Flaxy convinces Walt to wait until they have saved more money before quitting his job, and he agrees to work for Caesar's release. Behind Walt's back, Flaxy and Hap pay Peggy Ferrar to say that she was with Caesar the night of the murder, and he is released for lack of evidence. The plan backfires, however, when Peggy tries to blackmail Hap, saying that she will admit to perjury unless he pays her $10,000. Hap then orders Caesar to kill Peggy and implicate Flaxy. When Flaxy, who is in on Hap's plan, goes to Walt for help, he confesses to having killed Peggy in self-defense in order to protect Flaxy. At his trial, however, a cabdriver claims to have witnessed Walt murdering Peggy. The district attorney is suspicious of the cabbie's story and tries to convince Walt to tell the truth, but Walt maintains his silence and is convicted. Garage owner Sam Malko, who owes Walt a favor, later visits him in prison and reveals that Caesar has been bragging that Walt is taking a rap for him. Determined to clear himself, Walt escapes from a train while he is being moved to another prison. He flags down passing motorist Nora Carson, who drives him home and bandages the wounds he sustained in his escape. Learning Walt's identity, Nora offers ...

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After Caesar, one of gangster Hap Richie's henchmen, commits a murder, Hap orders his lawyer, Walter Colby, to obtain Caesar's release from jail. Tired of defending criminals, Walt wants to leave Hap's organization, and to prevent this, Hap recruits singer Flaxy Martin, with whom Walt is in love. Flaxy convinces Walt to wait until they have saved more money before quitting his job, and he agrees to work for Caesar's release. Behind Walt's back, Flaxy and Hap pay Peggy Ferrar to say that she was with Caesar the night of the murder, and he is released for lack of evidence. The plan backfires, however, when Peggy tries to blackmail Hap, saying that she will admit to perjury unless he pays her $10,000. Hap then orders Caesar to kill Peggy and implicate Flaxy. When Flaxy, who is in on Hap's plan, goes to Walt for help, he confesses to having killed Peggy in self-defense in order to protect Flaxy. At his trial, however, a cabdriver claims to have witnessed Walt murdering Peggy. The district attorney is suspicious of the cabbie's story and tries to convince Walt to tell the truth, but Walt maintains his silence and is convicted. Garage owner Sam Malko, who owes Walt a favor, later visits him in prison and reveals that Caesar has been bragging that Walt is taking a rap for him. Determined to clear himself, Walt escapes from a train while he is being moved to another prison. He flags down passing motorist Nora Carson, who drives him home and bandages the wounds he sustained in his escape. Learning Walt's identity, Nora offers to help him, but he does not want to involve her. Before he can leave, however, the police arrive, alerted by a nosy neighbor. At the same time, Roper, one of Hap's men, comes in the back door. He locks the police in the closet, and after handcuffing Nora and Walt together, takes them away. They struggle with their captors and escape, still cuffed together. Heading for New York, they use a ruse to pass the roadblock and drive to Sam's garage for help. Leaving Nora at the garage, Walt then goes to Caesar's apartment, where Roper is waiting for him after having killed Caesar. Walt manages to get away, but Roper follows and tries to kill him. During the ensuing struggle, Roper is killed when he falls off the roof. Walt then confronts Flaxy, who claims that she framed him to save his life. When Hap later arrives at her apartment, she pulls a gun on both men and steals Hap's wallet. There is a struggle and in the confusion, Flaxy shoots Hap. Walt turns Flaxy in for Hap's murder and returns to Sam's garage and Nora. When Nora refuses to run away with Walt, however, he turns himself in, and Nora promises to wait for his release.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.