The Girl from Jones Beach (1949)

77 or 79 mins | Comedy | 16 July 1949

Director:

Peter Godfrey

Producer:

Alex Gottlieb

Cinematographer:

Carl Guthrie

Editor:

Rudi Fehr

Production Designer:

Stanley Fleischer

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a 19 Feb 1948 NYT news item, Julius J. and Philip G. Epstein were scheduled to work on the script of this film. On 14 Apr 1948, HR reported that Dennis Morgan had been assigned to star in the film. Lauren Bacall was suspended when she turned down a role in the film, according to a 19 Apr 1948 HR news item. The Girl from Jones Beach marked the last film appearance of character actor Henry Travers (1874--1965), best known for his role as the angel "Clarence Oddbody" in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (see entry). ...

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According to a 19 Feb 1948 NYT news item, Julius J. and Philip G. Epstein were scheduled to work on the script of this film. On 14 Apr 1948, HR reported that Dennis Morgan had been assigned to star in the film. Lauren Bacall was suspended when she turned down a role in the film, according to a 19 Apr 1948 HR news item. The Girl from Jones Beach marked the last film appearance of character actor Henry Travers (1874--1965), best known for his role as the angel "Clarence Oddbody" in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (see entry).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Jun 1949
---
Daily Variety
21 Jun 1949
p. 3
Film Daily
27 Jun 1949
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 1948
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 1948
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1948
p. 17
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 1948
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 1949
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Jun 1949
p. 4658
New York Times
19 Feb 1948
---
New York Times
30 Jul 1949
p. 9
Variety
22 Jun 1949
p. 6
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Daniel de Jonghe
Joyce Lansing
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Art Lueker
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 July 1949
Production Date:
mid May--1 Jul 1948
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
16 July 1949
LP2408
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77 or 79
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Struggling New York City talent agent Chuck Donovan is hired by the producers of a television program to discover the identity of the model for "The Randolph Girl," a shapely woman drawn by commercial artist Bob Randolph. At Bob's studio, Miss Brooks, Bob's secretary, admits that even she does not know who the model is. Donovan then tries to convince Bob to reveal his secret, and while they are speaking, a man from a collection agency presents Bob with a bill for twelve gold bracelets. Later, a model arrives at the studio, and willingly admits to posing as the Randolph Girl. When Donovan confronts Bob with her statement, he confesses that the Randolph Girl is actually a composite of twelve different models, none of whom knows about the others. Thoroughly depressed, Donovan decides to kill himself. After sending a message to his girl friend, photographer Connie Martin, who always rescues him from his frequent suicide attempts, Donovan heads for Jones Beach, planning to drown himself. There, while searching for Connie through his binoculars, he spots a woman who is the perfect likeness of the Randolph Girl. By the time he rows ashore, however, she has vanished into the women's locker room, and he is unable to recognize her once she is fully dressed. Every day for a week, Donovan and Bob haunt the beach looking for the woman. Finally, Donovan guesses that Ruth Wilson is the mysterious woman and follows her home. He learns that Ruth is a schoolteacher who lives with her mother and younger brother Woody. Because she does not want a man to marry her for her looks, ...

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Struggling New York City talent agent Chuck Donovan is hired by the producers of a television program to discover the identity of the model for "The Randolph Girl," a shapely woman drawn by commercial artist Bob Randolph. At Bob's studio, Miss Brooks, Bob's secretary, admits that even she does not know who the model is. Donovan then tries to convince Bob to reveal his secret, and while they are speaking, a man from a collection agency presents Bob with a bill for twelve gold bracelets. Later, a model arrives at the studio, and willingly admits to posing as the Randolph Girl. When Donovan confronts Bob with her statement, he confesses that the Randolph Girl is actually a composite of twelve different models, none of whom knows about the others. Thoroughly depressed, Donovan decides to kill himself. After sending a message to his girl friend, photographer Connie Martin, who always rescues him from his frequent suicide attempts, Donovan heads for Jones Beach, planning to drown himself. There, while searching for Connie through his binoculars, he spots a woman who is the perfect likeness of the Randolph Girl. By the time he rows ashore, however, she has vanished into the women's locker room, and he is unable to recognize her once she is fully dressed. Every day for a week, Donovan and Bob haunt the beach looking for the woman. Finally, Donovan guesses that Ruth Wilson is the mysterious woman and follows her home. He learns that Ruth is a schoolteacher who lives with her mother and younger brother Woody. Because she does not want a man to marry her for her looks, she purposely dresses in a dowdy style. Ruth teaches English to immigrants at night school, and Donovan persuades Bob to attend her class, posing as a recent immigrant from Czechoslovakia. Although Ruth is suspicious of Bob's mutating accent, she agrees to go out with him and gradually falls in love with him. When the newspapers announce that the Randolph Girl will be on television, all twelve of Bob's models expect to make an appearance. In the course of trying to mollify the women, Donovan accidentally drops Bob's address book at the home of one of the models. The next morning, all twelve of the models quit. Then Bob is spotted by Miss Brooks while he is with Ruth, and his real identity is revealed. Bob explains that after he saw Ruth at the beach, he wanted to meet her and thus enrolled in the class. He then adds that he is attracted to her mind, but perversely, Ruth wants him to admire her looks. Later, Bob refuses to attend a big party in honor of the Randolph Girl because he is in love with Ruth and wants to get married. The following day, Ruth asks Bob to meet her at Jones Beach. Donovan then phones Connie, planning to sneak a photograph of Ruth and leak it to the newspapers. When the picture runs, Emma Shoemaker, the dean of the school, asks for Ruth's resignation, and when she refuses, fires her. Ruth takes the school to court. Bob appears as a witness on her behalf and projects a film about bathing suits through the years. In one, a young Emma is seen being arrested for indecent exposure in the early 1900s. Then Ruth takes the stand in her bathing suit and states that her private life is none of the school's business. Ruth is reinstated, and she and Bob plan a double wedding with Donovan and Connie.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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