In the Good Old Summertime (1949)

102 or 103 mins | Comedy-drama, Romance, Musical | July 1949

Director:

Robert Z. Leonard

Producer:

Joe Pasternak

Cinematographer:

Harry Stradling

Editor:

Adrienne Fazan

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Randall Duell

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Working titles for this film were I Don't Care and The Good Old Summertime . Various contemporary news items in HR indicate that the film was originally assigned to producer Arthur Freed, and that production on the film, which was initially scheduled to begin in Jun 1944, was postponed many times over the course of four years. Pre-production news items in HR indicate that the film was originally intended as a Mickey Rooney vehicle, and that Frank Sinatra was later set to star opposite Gloria De Haven . A Dec 1946 HR news item listed Gene Kelly as Judy Garland's co-star. A May 1944 HR news item noted that Keenan Wynn was set for a top role, but he did not appear in the final film. An Oct 1948 LAT news item noted that Peter Lawford and June Allyson were being considered for the starring roles. Although early HR production charts list actress Mary Astor in the cast, she did not appear in the released film.
       The film marked the screen debut of Liza Minelli, who, at age two, appears in the picture's brief epilogue. Actor S. Z. Sakall was borrowed from Warner Bros. A song entitled "Last Night When We Were Young," which was sung by Judy Garland, was cut from the film just prior to its release. The film marked Buster Keaton's last picture for M-G-M.
       An earlier film based on László's play was M-G-M's 1940 Shop Around the Corner (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1931-40 ; F3.4036). The Shop Around the Corner , which ... More Less

Working titles for this film were I Don't Care and The Good Old Summertime . Various contemporary news items in HR indicate that the film was originally assigned to producer Arthur Freed, and that production on the film, which was initially scheduled to begin in Jun 1944, was postponed many times over the course of four years. Pre-production news items in HR indicate that the film was originally intended as a Mickey Rooney vehicle, and that Frank Sinatra was later set to star opposite Gloria De Haven . A Dec 1946 HR news item listed Gene Kelly as Judy Garland's co-star. A May 1944 HR news item noted that Keenan Wynn was set for a top role, but he did not appear in the final film. An Oct 1948 LAT news item noted that Peter Lawford and June Allyson were being considered for the starring roles. Although early HR production charts list actress Mary Astor in the cast, she did not appear in the released film.
       The film marked the screen debut of Liza Minelli, who, at age two, appears in the picture's brief epilogue. Actor S. Z. Sakall was borrowed from Warner Bros. A song entitled "Last Night When We Were Young," which was sung by Judy Garland, was cut from the film just prior to its release. The film marked Buster Keaton's last picture for M-G-M.
       An earlier film based on László's play was M-G-M's 1940 Shop Around the Corner (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films 1931-40 ; F3.4036). The Shop Around the Corner , which is not a musical and is set in Budapest, Hungary, was directed by Ernst Lubitsch and starred Margaret Sullavan and James Stewart. A musical stage version of the play, entitled She Loves Me , opened in New York on 23 Apr 1963. She Loves Me was later produced as a teleplay by BBC, and aired on the PBS network on 19 Dec 1979. In 1998, Warner Bros. released You've Got Mail , an updated version of László's play, directed by Nora Ephron and starring Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Jun 1949.
---
Daily Variety
23 Jun 49
p. 4.
Film Daily
30 Jun 49
p. 7.
Hollywood Citizen-News
7 Feb 1948.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 44
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 46
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 48
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
14 Oct 1948.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Jun 49
p. 4657.
New York Times
5 Aug 49
p. 23.
Variety
29 Jun 1949.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Robert Z. Leonard Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Wrt for the screen by
Wrt for the screen by
Wrt for the screen by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Women's cost
Men's cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
Vocal orch
Mus seq dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairstyles des by
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prog mgr
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Assoc
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Illatszertar (also known as Perfumerie ) by Nikolaus László (copyrighted 10 Nov 1936) and the film The Shop Around the Corner written by Samson Raphaelson (M-G-M, 1940).
SONGS
"In the Good Old Summertime," music by George Evans, lyrics by Ren Shields
"Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland," music and lyrics by Beth S. Huston and Leo Friedman
"Put Your Arms Around Me, Honey," music and lyrics by Junie McCree and Albert Von Tilzer
+
SONGS
"In the Good Old Summertime," music by George Evans, lyrics by Ren Shields
"Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland," music and lyrics by Beth S. Huston and Leo Friedman
"Put Your Arms Around Me, Honey," music and lyrics by Junie McCree and Albert Von Tilzer
"Wait 'Til the Sun Shines, Nellie," music and lyrics by Andrew B. Sterling and Harry Von Tilzer
"Play That Barbershop Chord," music and lyrics by Ballard MacDonald, William Tracey and Lewis F. Muir
"I Don't Care," music and lyrics by Harry O. Sutton and Jean Lenox
"Merry Christmas," music by Fred Spielman, lyrics by Janice Torre.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Good Old Summertime
The One I Love
Release Date:
July 1949
Production Date:
late November 1948--late January 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 June 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2370
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
102 or 103
Length(in feet):
9,234
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13720
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On a spring day in Chicago, at the turn of the twentieth century, Andrew Delby Larkin, a salesman at Otto Oberkugen's music shop, eagerly rushes to the post office in the hope of finding a letter from his secret pen pal, whom he knows only as "Box Number 237." To Andrew's delight, a letter awaits him, and he proudly reads it to his friend and co-worker, Rudy Hansen. By a strange coincidence, Veronica Fisher, who is Box Number 237, enters Oberkugen's shop that day looking for work, unaware that Andrew is her pen pal. Veronica is met with Andrew's condescending disinterest, as he, too, is unaware that his secret pen pal is in his presence. Mr. Oberkugen at first refuses to hire Veronica, but he eventually offers her a sales position when she cleverly persuades a customer to buy one of his pet instruments, an expensive Amboy harp. Veronica's early success at salesmanship proves to a fluke, however, and sales at the store begin to slide. So, too, does her professional relationship with Andrew, who has become increasingly hostile towards her. On the day that Veronica and Andrew are to meet their respective pen pals, the two arrive at work in high spirits, but their mood quickly changes as they become embroiled in a petty dispute. Furthermore, Oberkugen, who is upset at having been spurned by his sweetheart, employee Nellie Burke, angers both Veronica and Andrew when he orders the entire staff to remain after hours to take a store inventory. Oberkugen eventually has a change of heart, though, and lets his employees out just in time for Andrew and Veronica to rush to ... +


On a spring day in Chicago, at the turn of the twentieth century, Andrew Delby Larkin, a salesman at Otto Oberkugen's music shop, eagerly rushes to the post office in the hope of finding a letter from his secret pen pal, whom he knows only as "Box Number 237." To Andrew's delight, a letter awaits him, and he proudly reads it to his friend and co-worker, Rudy Hansen. By a strange coincidence, Veronica Fisher, who is Box Number 237, enters Oberkugen's shop that day looking for work, unaware that Andrew is her pen pal. Veronica is met with Andrew's condescending disinterest, as he, too, is unaware that his secret pen pal is in his presence. Mr. Oberkugen at first refuses to hire Veronica, but he eventually offers her a sales position when she cleverly persuades a customer to buy one of his pet instruments, an expensive Amboy harp. Veronica's early success at salesmanship proves to a fluke, however, and sales at the store begin to slide. So, too, does her professional relationship with Andrew, who has become increasingly hostile towards her. On the day that Veronica and Andrew are to meet their respective pen pals, the two arrive at work in high spirits, but their mood quickly changes as they become embroiled in a petty dispute. Furthermore, Oberkugen, who is upset at having been spurned by his sweetheart, employee Nellie Burke, angers both Veronica and Andrew when he orders the entire staff to remain after hours to take a store inventory. Oberkugen eventually has a change of heart, though, and lets his employees out just in time for Andrew and Veronica to rush to their pen pals. When Andrew peers into the restaurant where he is to meet his secret pen pal, he is shocked to discover that his pen pal is Veronica. Bewildered and embarrassed, Andrew runs away before Veronica sees him, and instead goes to a recital by Louise Parkson, one of the residents at the boardinghouse where he lives. Although Andrew eventually changes his mind and returns to the restaurant, he does not reveal to Veronica that he is the person she has been waiting to meet. Instead, he makes a clumsy attempt to win Veronica's affection by flirting with her. This leads to an argument and ends with Veronica leaving the restaurant thinking that her secret pen pal decided not to approach her after having seen her. Devastated by the apparent rejection, Veronica becomes reclusive and refuses to leave her home. Guilt-ridden about what has happened, Andrew asks Veronica to accompany him to Otto and Nellie's engagement party, and she accepts. Later, when Otto learns that Andrew has loaned his prized Stradivarius violin to Louise for her big recital, he fires him. The decision is eventually reversed, though, when Otto realizes that Andrew acted out of kindness, and he is offered his job back with a raise. Having finally secured the pay raise he felt he needed to marry his sweetheart, on Christmas Eve, Andrew reveals to Veronica that he is her secret pen pal. They kiss, and she consents to marry him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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