John Loves Mary (1949)

96 or 98 mins | Romantic comedy | 19 February 1949

Director:

David Butler

Producer:

Jerry Wald

Cinematographer:

Peverell Marley

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's end credits run over pictures of the actors. This film marked the motion picture debut of actress Patricia Neal (1926--2010). A version of this story, starring Ronald Reagan and Patricia Neal, was broadcast on Lux Radio Theatre on 19 Jun 1950. ...

More Less

The film's end credits run over pictures of the actors. This film marked the motion picture debut of actress Patricia Neal (1926--2010). A version of this story, starring Ronald Reagan and Patricia Neal, was broadcast on Lux Radio Theatre on 19 Jun 1950.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Jan 1949
---
Daily Variety
25 Jan 1949
p. 3, 11
Film Daily
25 Jan 1949
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
6 Feb 1947
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jan 1948
p. 13
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1948
p. 17
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jan 1949
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1949
p. 10
Los Angeles Times
6 Mar 1947
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Jan 1949
p. 4477-78
New York Times
5 Feb 1949
p. 11
Variety
1 Jan 1949
p. 11
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d cam
Asst cam
Gaffer
Gene Richee
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Men's ward
Ladies' ward
MUSIC
Orch arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff dir
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
Ray Foreman
Hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play John Loves Mary by Norman Krasna (New York, 4 Feb 1947).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
MUSIC
"Someone to Watch Over Me," music by George Gershwin.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 February 1949
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 4 Feb 1949
Production Date:
mid Jan--late Feb 1948
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
19 February 1949
LP2106
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
96 or 98
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Returning from four years of war, soldier John Lawrence telephones his girl friend Mary McKinley to announce that he will be with her in New York City that afternoon. Mary buys champagne and caviar and ecstatically waits for his arrival. Before then, Fred Taylor, who saved John's life during the war, appears at Mary's with a suit of civilian clothes for him. Fred has been a civilian for the past two years, so when John finally arrives, the two friends talk over old times. When Mary leaves the room, John tells Fred that while he was in London, he discovered that Fred's English girl friend, Lilly Herbish, whom he thought had been killed in the blitz, is still alive. John explains that because of the immigrant quota, Lilly would not have been able to come to the United States for several years, but as a soldier's wife, she could immigrate immediately, so, wanting to help the man who saved his life, John married her. Although Fred appears to be more disturbed than grateful, John continues to outline his plan for Fred and Lilly to proceed to Reno, where Lilly will divorce him and marry Fred. After Fred leaves, John starts to carefully break the news to Mary, but is interrupted by the unexpected return of her parents, Senator James McKinley and his wife Phyllis. John asks McKinley for permission to marry Mary, but is nonplussed when the senator insists that they hold the wedding immediately. Later, a bemused Fred returns to the McKinley apartment, and once again, John starts to explain the situation, but before he can complete his story, he inadvertently learns that ...

More Less

Returning from four years of war, soldier John Lawrence telephones his girl friend Mary McKinley to announce that he will be with her in New York City that afternoon. Mary buys champagne and caviar and ecstatically waits for his arrival. Before then, Fred Taylor, who saved John's life during the war, appears at Mary's with a suit of civilian clothes for him. Fred has been a civilian for the past two years, so when John finally arrives, the two friends talk over old times. When Mary leaves the room, John tells Fred that while he was in London, he discovered that Fred's English girl friend, Lilly Herbish, whom he thought had been killed in the blitz, is still alive. John explains that because of the immigrant quota, Lilly would not have been able to come to the United States for several years, but as a soldier's wife, she could immigrate immediately, so, wanting to help the man who saved his life, John married her. Although Fred appears to be more disturbed than grateful, John continues to outline his plan for Fred and Lilly to proceed to Reno, where Lilly will divorce him and marry Fred. After Fred leaves, John starts to carefully break the news to Mary, but is interrupted by the unexpected return of her parents, Senator James McKinley and his wife Phyllis. John asks McKinley for permission to marry Mary, but is nonplussed when the senator insists that they hold the wedding immediately. Later, a bemused Fred returns to the McKinley apartment, and once again, John starts to explain the situation, but before he can complete his story, he inadvertently learns that Fred is married, and his wife is expecting a baby. Privately, John and Fred then hatch a plot that will allow John to postpone his marriage to Mary until he can be divorced from Lilly. Fred asks their former lieutenant, Victor O'Leary, who is now working as a theater usher, to put on his old uniform and pretend to order John to proceed to Nevada for sixty days to finish some Army business. O'Leary accepts a payment of fifty dollars to cooperate with the plan. He then leeringly tells Fred that he too had dated Lilly but devised a scheme to avoid marrying her. The next day, at the McKinley apartment, O'Leary carries out his part of the plan, but Mary is so distraught at the thought of postponing the wedding that she insists that her father get John released from his assignment. When John protests that he will not accept special favors, Mary's feelings are hurt and she leaves the apartment with her parents. While they are gone, Lilly arrives and soon learns that Fred is already married. Meanwhile, Mary has asked General Biddle to act on John's behalf. When John again refuses to relinquish his assignment, Mary is convinced that he does not love her and breaks their engagement. Finally, after more complications, John blurts out the entire story. Lilly reveals that she had married O'Leary, but received a letter that purported to be from his mother explaining that he had been killed. She is reunited with an unwilling O'Leary, and John, whose marriage to Lilly turns out to be not legal, is free to marry Mary.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Johnny O'Clock

This was the first film of producer Ed Nealis and well-known celebrity lawyer Jerry Gielser. The film also marked Robert Rossen's directorial debut, and the screen debut of actor ... >>

The Godfather

The film's opening title card reads: "Mario Puzo's The Godfather." While the first strains of a trumpet solo of Nino Rota's "Godfather" theme are heard on ... >>

Cannery Row

       The first attempt at a motion picture adaptation of John Steinbeck’s 1945 novel, Cannery Row, was made in the late 1940s. According to a news item ... >>

Dracula

Bela Lugosi created the role of Dracula onstage in the 5 Oct 1927 American premiere of Hamilton Deane's adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel. Lon Chaney was originally ... >>

The Sound of Music

The onscreen title reads "Rodgers and Hammerstein's The Sound of Music."
       The Sound of Music was adapted from the Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.