Night unto Night (1949)

84 mins | Drama | 14 May 1949

Director:

Don Siegel

Writer:

Kathryn Scola

Producer:

Owen Crompton

Cinematographer:

Peverell Marley

Editor:

Thomas Reilly

Production Designer:

Hugh Reticker

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The title of Philip Wylie's novel was taken from the Nineteenth Psalm, "Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night skeweth knowledge." After the novel was purchased by Warner Bros., a 21 Jan 1946 DV news item speculated that Bette Davis would play the part of "Ann." The film was originally intended to be Viveca Lindfors' American debut, but its release was delayed, and by the time the film was finally released, Lindfors was no longer under contract to Warner Bros. Lindfors and director Don Siegel married in 1949. Night Unto Night was the only film on which they both worked. ...

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The title of Philip Wylie's novel was taken from the Nineteenth Psalm, "Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night skeweth knowledge." After the novel was purchased by Warner Bros., a 21 Jan 1946 DV news item speculated that Bette Davis would play the part of "Ann." The film was originally intended to be Viveca Lindfors' American debut, but its release was delayed, and by the time the film was finally released, Lindfors was no longer under contract to Warner Bros. Lindfors and director Don Siegel married in 1949. Night Unto Night was the only film on which they both worked.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Apr 1949
---
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1946
---
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1949
p. 3
Film Daily
21 Apr 1949
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1946
p. 19
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 1947
p. 19
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 1949
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Apr 1949
p. 4581
New York Times
11 Jun 1949
p. 11
Variety
20 Apr 1949
p. 11
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Owen Crump
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff dir
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Lou Baum
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Night unto Night by Philip Wylie (New York, 1944).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 May 1949
Production Date:
mid Sep 1946--mid Jan 1947
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
15 June 1947
LP2285
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in feet):
7,590
Country:
United States
PCA No:
12007
SYNOPSIS

While looking for a place to rent on Florida's east coast, scientist John Gaylord meets widow Ann Gracie outside her rambling house. Because she seems deeply disturbed by something, John offers to drive her into town. He drops her at the home of her friends, artist C. L. Shawn and his wife Thalia. They invite John inside, and there, Ann reveals that while packing the possessions of her dead husband Bill, she heard his voice. John is skeptical, but Shawn professes his belief in life after death. Later that evening, John suffers an epileptic attack at his hotel, and the following day, he visits a doctor, who explains that John's condition is deteriorating. After John rents Ann's house, her flirtatious sister Lisa pays him a visit. John questions Lisa about Ann, and learns that Bill was killed during the war. Rather than leave town, as Lisa advises, Ann takes a job managing an auto court near her house. One day, John encounters her walking along the beach, and again, Ann insists that she heard Bill's voice that day in the house. Later, John drops in on Shawn, who questions his beliefs about death. John has kept his epilepsy a secret from his new friends, but at an exhibition of Shawn's work, Shawn accidentally discovers the truth. Lisa continues to visit John, but when she kisses him, he rebuffs her advances. One day, while John spends the day with Shawn and his family, Ann is drawn to the house and again hears Bill's voice advising her not to live in her memory. She is still sitting in the house ...

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While looking for a place to rent on Florida's east coast, scientist John Gaylord meets widow Ann Gracie outside her rambling house. Because she seems deeply disturbed by something, John offers to drive her into town. He drops her at the home of her friends, artist C. L. Shawn and his wife Thalia. They invite John inside, and there, Ann reveals that while packing the possessions of her dead husband Bill, she heard his voice. John is skeptical, but Shawn professes his belief in life after death. Later that evening, John suffers an epileptic attack at his hotel, and the following day, he visits a doctor, who explains that John's condition is deteriorating. After John rents Ann's house, her flirtatious sister Lisa pays him a visit. John questions Lisa about Ann, and learns that Bill was killed during the war. Rather than leave town, as Lisa advises, Ann takes a job managing an auto court near her house. One day, John encounters her walking along the beach, and again, Ann insists that she heard Bill's voice that day in the house. Later, John drops in on Shawn, who questions his beliefs about death. John has kept his epilepsy a secret from his new friends, but at an exhibition of Shawn's work, Shawn accidentally discovers the truth. Lisa continues to visit John, but when she kisses him, he rebuffs her advances. One day, while John spends the day with Shawn and his family, Ann is drawn to the house and again hears Bill's voice advising her not to live in her memory. She is still sitting in the house when John returns, and he comforts her. Soon, Ann and John fall in love. One night, John has another, much stronger, seizure. He considers suicide, but is interrupted by the arrival of Dr. Poole, who had treated him in Chicago. Poole explains that John telephoned him during the night while still suffering from the effects of his seizure. Learning of John's love for Ann, Poole advises him to tell her the truth about his condition, but John decides to break off their relationship. The following day, Poole and Shawn have a philosophical discussion, and during its course, Poole reveals that John is getting sicker. When Shawn later realizes that Ann has fallen deeply in love with John, he is disturbed and tells her about John's illness. John holds a dinner party in Poole's honor, and as a hurricane approaches, a drunken Lisa jealously starts to verbally attack Ann. After the storm knocks out the lights, John and Ann search for lamps, and she reveals that she knows about his condition, but does not care. Lisa overhears and taunts John, who leaves the room. Ann follows, and finding him with a gun, begs him not to kill himself. Passionately, she describes the eternal nature of love and proclaims her belief that all happiness should be embraced, even if it only lasts for a short time. Persuaded to accept Ann's love, John decides not to commit suicide.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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