Side Street (1949)

82-84 mins | Drama | 14 December 1949

Director:

Anthony Mann

Writer:

Sydney Boehm

Producer:

Sam Zimbalist

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg A.S.C.

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Daniel B. Cathcart

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

Actress Cathy O'Donnell was borrowed for the film from David O. Selznick and Farley Granger was borrowed from Samuel Goldwyn. Publicity materials note that much of the film was shot at various locations in New York City, including Central Park, Stuyvesant Town, Battery Park, the Bellvue Hospital morgue, the Polyclinic maternity ward, Wall Street, Bowling Green Park, the Fulton Fish Market, the Queensboro Bridge and a Greenwich Village nightclub. According to a NYT article, filming of the scene in which a taxicab is being chased through the Wall Street area of New York City ran into some difficulties when the taxicab that was supposed to hit a curb and flip onto its side in front of the J. P. Morgan Building failed to do so after repeated attempts. ...

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Actress Cathy O'Donnell was borrowed for the film from David O. Selznick and Farley Granger was borrowed from Samuel Goldwyn. Publicity materials note that much of the film was shot at various locations in New York City, including Central Park, Stuyvesant Town, Battery Park, the Bellvue Hospital morgue, the Polyclinic maternity ward, Wall Street, Bowling Green Park, the Fulton Fish Market, the Queensboro Bridge and a Greenwich Village nightclub. According to a NYT article, filming of the scene in which a taxicab is being chased through the Wall Street area of New York City ran into some difficulties when the taxicab that was supposed to hit a curb and flip onto its side in front of the J. P. Morgan Building failed to do so after repeated attempts.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 Dec 1949
---
Daily Variety
22 Dec 1949
p. 3
Film Daily
27 Dec 1949
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
5 Apr 1949
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1949
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1949
p. 12
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 1949
p. 2, 6
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 1949
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 1949
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 1949
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
24 Dec 1949
p. 130
New York Times
24 Mar 1950
p. 29
Variety
28 Dec 1949
p. 6
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
John A. Butler
Herbert Vigran
Helen Eby-Rock
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Howard Koch
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus score
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Hair styles des by
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Charley Hunt
Unit mgr
Scr supv
Grip
SOURCES
SONGS
"Easy to Love," music and lyrics by Cole Porter.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 December 1949
Production Date:
21 Apr--mid Jun 1949
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
25 November 1949
LP2649
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82-84
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13954
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Joe Norson, an expectant father and a New York City postman of modest means, dreams of having enough money to take his wife Ellen to Europe. One day, while on his mail delivery route, Joe, frustrated by his inability to provide for his wife and future family, steals $30,000 from the office of disreputable lawyer Victor Backett. Unknown to Joe, the $30,000 was blackmail payoff money that Backett extorted from Emil Lorrison, an innocent man who was framed in a sex scandal by the crooked lawyer. Backett later kills Lorrison and dumps his body in the East River. Joe, meanwhile, tries to explain his sudden wealth by telling Ellen that he has taken a lucrative job in Schenectady. For safekeeping, Joe packages the money and leaves it with his pal Nick Drumman, a bartender. A short time later, Ellen gives birth to a baby boy, and Joe, feeling remorse for the theft, decides to return the stolen money. Backett, however, suspects that Joe is trying to trap him, and refuses to accept the money until he does a background check on Joe. Backett later sends his accomplice, Georgie Garsell, to abduct Joe and get the package, but when Garsell opens it, he discrovers that the money is missing. When Garsell learns that Nick has absconded with the $30,000, he kills the bartender and recovers the money. Joe is later sought by the police for Nick's murder, but he eludes capture and goes to the hospital where Ellen is recuperating from childbirth. There, Joe explains the story to his wife, and she urges him to surrender himself to the police. ...

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Joe Norson, an expectant father and a New York City postman of modest means, dreams of having enough money to take his wife Ellen to Europe. One day, while on his mail delivery route, Joe, frustrated by his inability to provide for his wife and future family, steals $30,000 from the office of disreputable lawyer Victor Backett. Unknown to Joe, the $30,000 was blackmail payoff money that Backett extorted from Emil Lorrison, an innocent man who was framed in a sex scandal by the crooked lawyer. Backett later kills Lorrison and dumps his body in the East River. Joe, meanwhile, tries to explain his sudden wealth by telling Ellen that he has taken a lucrative job in Schenectady. For safekeeping, Joe packages the money and leaves it with his pal Nick Drumman, a bartender. A short time later, Ellen gives birth to a baby boy, and Joe, feeling remorse for the theft, decides to return the stolen money. Backett, however, suspects that Joe is trying to trap him, and refuses to accept the money until he does a background check on Joe. Backett later sends his accomplice, Georgie Garsell, to abduct Joe and get the package, but when Garsell opens it, he discrovers that the money is missing. When Garsell learns that Nick has absconded with the $30,000, he kills the bartender and recovers the money. Joe is later sought by the police for Nick's murder, but he eludes capture and goes to the hospital where Ellen is recuperating from childbirth. There, Joe explains the story to his wife, and she urges him to surrender himself to the police. Joe, however, refuses to do so but Garsell sets a trap for him and enlists the aid of his cab driver friend, Larry Giff, to kill Joe and dump his body in the river. En route to the location where they intend to murder Joe, Garsell and Giff are followed by police Captain Walter Anderson, and a chase ensues. In a desperate move to end the chase, Joe grabs the steering wheel of the taxi and deliberately crashes it. Garsell is shot and killed while trying to escape, but Joe lives to tell the truth to the police.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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