Colt .45 (1950)

74 or 76 mins | Western | 27 May 1950

Director:

Edwin L. Marin

Producer:

Saul Elkins

Cinematographer:

Wilfrid M. Cline

Editor:

Frank Magee

Production Designer:

Douglas Bacon

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film begins with the following written foreword: "A gun like any other source of power, is a force for either good or evil, being neither in itself, but dependent upon those who possess it." This was the last film that well-known character actor Alan Hale (1892--1950) made before his death, although the 1950 Columbia film Rogues of Sherwood Forest, which was filmed prior to Colt .45, was released later. ...

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The film begins with the following written foreword: "A gun like any other source of power, is a force for either good or evil, being neither in itself, but dependent upon those who possess it." This was the last film that well-known character actor Alan Hale (1892--1950) made before his death, although the 1950 Columbia film Rogues of Sherwood Forest, which was filmed prior to Colt .45, was released later.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 May 1950
---
Daily Variety
3 May 1950
p. 3
Film Daily
3 May 1950
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 1950
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 May 1950
p. 285
New York Times
6 May 1950
p. 8
Variety
3 May 1950
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Thomas Blackburn
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 May 1950
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 5 May 1950
Production Date:
mid Nov--mid Dec 1949
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
22 May 1950
LP123
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
74 or 76
Length(in feet):
6,653
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14347
SYNOPSIS

While gun salesman Steve Farrell is demonstrating the new Colt .45 repeating pistols to a sheriff, prisoner Jason Brett, who is being transferred to another jail, manages to take the pistols and make his escape. The townspeople are convinced that Steve was Brett's partner and jail him. During the four months that Steve is jailed, Brett begins a long siege of theft and murder. Regular rifles and pistols are no match for his Colt .45 pistols. When Steve is finally released, the sheriff offers him a letter clearing him of the charges against him, providing he reveals Brett's hiding place. Steve, however, proclaims his innocence, and vows to get his guns back from Brett. Steve finds Brett's trail when he happens on a group of Indians whom Brett has killed to provide a cover for a stagecoach robbery. After Walking Bear, the sole survivor of the slaughter, tells Steve about Brett's plan, Steve boards the stage and fights off the attack with his own set of Colt .45s, despite the attempts of Beth Donovan, the only passenger on the stage, to prevent him. Unknown to Steve, Beth is the wife of Paul Donovan, one of Brett's associates. Later, Steve notices that a white scarf hung outside the stagecoach is being used as a signal and, sure that Beth is part of the gang, tries to bring her to the sheriff. Beth escapes and returns to camp. Although Beth believes that Paul has been forced to work with Brett, he is actually plotting with the bandit to take over the nearby town of Bonanza Creek. Sheriff Harris, who unknown to the town is allied with ...

More Less

While gun salesman Steve Farrell is demonstrating the new Colt .45 repeating pistols to a sheriff, prisoner Jason Brett, who is being transferred to another jail, manages to take the pistols and make his escape. The townspeople are convinced that Steve was Brett's partner and jail him. During the four months that Steve is jailed, Brett begins a long siege of theft and murder. Regular rifles and pistols are no match for his Colt .45 pistols. When Steve is finally released, the sheriff offers him a letter clearing him of the charges against him, providing he reveals Brett's hiding place. Steve, however, proclaims his innocence, and vows to get his guns back from Brett. Steve finds Brett's trail when he happens on a group of Indians whom Brett has killed to provide a cover for a stagecoach robbery. After Walking Bear, the sole survivor of the slaughter, tells Steve about Brett's plan, Steve boards the stage and fights off the attack with his own set of Colt .45s, despite the attempts of Beth Donovan, the only passenger on the stage, to prevent him. Unknown to Steve, Beth is the wife of Paul Donovan, one of Brett's associates. Later, Steve notices that a white scarf hung outside the stagecoach is being used as a signal and, sure that Beth is part of the gang, tries to bring her to the sheriff. Beth escapes and returns to camp. Although Beth believes that Paul has been forced to work with Brett, he is actually plotting with the bandit to take over the nearby town of Bonanza Creek. Sheriff Harris, who unknown to the town is allied with Brett, agrees to make Steve his deputy, but immediately reveals the fact to Brett, who then plans an ambush for Steve. Steve evades the ambush with the help of Walking Bear's fellow Indians. He captures two members of the gang and brings them back to town. At the hideout, Beth overhears Paul plotting with Brett and realizes her husband is actively working with the gang. After Beth denounces Paul, he locks her in a store room. Later, she manages to escape and hurries into town, planning to reveal everything to the authorities. Donovan stops Beth outside the town, and when she tries to ride past him, shoots her. Steve, hearing the shots, finds Beth lying on the ground and takes her with him to seek refuge with Walking Bear. Beth warns Steve about Paul and Brett's plan to take over Bonanza Creek. Then the Indians discover Donovan's body, shot in the back by a .45. After Steve learns that the Indians intend to go on the warpath, he tries to warn the town, but Brett's men trap and capture him. The Indians kill his captors, but Harris survives. While Steve and the Indians quietly kill many of Brett's men in town, Harris crawls back to warn Brett. Using Beth as a shield, Brett tries to escape, but Beth breaks away and the Indians taunt Brett into using all his powder. Steve then overcomes Brett and is rewarded with Beth's embrace.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.