The Cowboy and the Indians (1949)

68 or 70 mins | Western | September 1949

Director:

John English

Producer:

Armand Schaefer

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Editor:

Henry Batista

Production Designer:

Harold MacArthur

Production Company:

Gene Autry Productions
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HISTORY

The song "Here Comes Santa Claus" became a Christmas "perennial." This film marked the first time that Jay Silverheels and Clayton Moore appeared together. They later starred in the television program The Lone Ranger ... More Less

The song "Here Comes Santa Claus" became a Christmas "perennial." This film marked the first time that Jay Silverheels and Clayton Moore appeared together. They later starred in the television program The Lone Ranger . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Dec 1949.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 49
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 49
p. 11.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Nov 50
p.
Variety
2 Nov 49
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
SOURCES
SONGS
"One Little Indian Boy," words and music by Robert Bilder
"America," lyrics by Samuel Francis Smith, music by Henry Carey
"Silent Night, Holy Night" words by Joseph Mohr, English words, anonymous, music by Franz Gruber. "Here Comes Santa Claus," words and music by Gene Autry and Oakley Haldeman.
DETAILS
Release Date:
September 1949
Production Date:
14 March--28 March 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Gene Autry Productions
Copyright Date:
30 September 1949
Copyright Number:
LP2668
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68 or 70
Country:
United States
PCA No:
13748
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At the Bar B Ranch, new owner Gene Autry is angry when he discovers that nearby Indians are grazing sheep on his land. He sets out to complain to Chief Long Arrow, but when he arrives on the reservation, he learns that One Mary, the chief's aging relative, is very ill. Concerned, Gene brings her to the trading post and summons a doctor. At the trading post, Gene stops the proprietor, "Smiley" Martin, from cheating Lakohna, an Indian. Then, over Martin's objections, Gene brings One Mary into the post to wait for the doctor. When Nan Palmer, the doctor, arrives, she determines that One Mary is suffering from malnutrition. Gene is shocked by the news and decides to allow the Indians to continue grazing their herds on his land. From Long Arrow's grandson Rona, Gene learns that the Indians do not get enough to eat. Later, Gene encounters Nan at the schoolhouse and helps her inoculate the children. As a favor to Nan, Gene brings medicine to Broken Arm at the reservation. There, he tries to stop some men claiming to be government agents from taking Broken Arm's sheep away from him, but they manage to drive the sheep over a cliff to their deaths. Later, the men are revealed to be cohorts of Martin, who are trying to force Broken Arm's wife Lucy to sell a priceless blanket, but Henderson, the head of the Indian Bureau, refuses to jail them unless he has solid proof that they are harming the Indians. Gene asks Bob Collins, a reporter, to write an expose for the paper, but Bob is not interested in ... +


At the Bar B Ranch, new owner Gene Autry is angry when he discovers that nearby Indians are grazing sheep on his land. He sets out to complain to Chief Long Arrow, but when he arrives on the reservation, he learns that One Mary, the chief's aging relative, is very ill. Concerned, Gene brings her to the trading post and summons a doctor. At the trading post, Gene stops the proprietor, "Smiley" Martin, from cheating Lakohna, an Indian. Then, over Martin's objections, Gene brings One Mary into the post to wait for the doctor. When Nan Palmer, the doctor, arrives, she determines that One Mary is suffering from malnutrition. Gene is shocked by the news and decides to allow the Indians to continue grazing their herds on his land. From Long Arrow's grandson Rona, Gene learns that the Indians do not get enough to eat. Later, Gene encounters Nan at the schoolhouse and helps her inoculate the children. As a favor to Nan, Gene brings medicine to Broken Arm at the reservation. There, he tries to stop some men claiming to be government agents from taking Broken Arm's sheep away from him, but they manage to drive the sheep over a cliff to their deaths. Later, the men are revealed to be cohorts of Martin, who are trying to force Broken Arm's wife Lucy to sell a priceless blanket, but Henderson, the head of the Indian Bureau, refuses to jail them unless he has solid proof that they are harming the Indians. Gene asks Bob Collins, a reporter, to write an expose for the paper, but Bob is not interested in the story. Then Gene telephones Congressman Lawrence, who asks Gene to write a full report. Gene learns that the Indians have lost many sheep, and that they have no water on the reservation with which to irrigate their corn. Without sheep for wool, the Indians are unable to weave the blankets that they sell for money to buy supplies. Thus, Martin is able to cheat them out of their possessions and sell them to curio dealer Fred Bradley. One of his partners covets the necklace that belongs to Long Arrow. Because he knows that the necklace is the property of the tribe, and that Long Arrow would never sell it, Martin decides to kill him, steal the necklace and pin the murder on Lakohna. After Long Arrow is discovered fatally wounded, Gene advises Lakohna to hide until he can discover the identity of the real murderer. That night, Gene and Lakohna sneak into the trading post looking for proof that Martin was behind the attack on Long Arrow. They are discovered and chased by Martin and his confederates. In the morning, Gene and Lakohna are trapped in the rocks, but are saved by the arrival of more Indians. Shortly after, the sheriff arrives with a posse, and Martin is arrested, after which the necklace is returned to Lakohna, who is now the tribe's chief. Bob writes the story, and the resulting publicity causes many people to send gifts to the Indians, and Congress grants the tribe an appropriation. Later, Nan, whose real name is Nanusha, reveals that she is half-Indian and will marry Lakohna. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.