Montana (1950)

76-77 or 79 mins | Western | 28 January 1950

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HISTORY

According to a 15 Jul 1947 LAT news item, Thames Williamson was first assigned to write the screenplay for the film, and Vincent Sherman was to direct. A 2 Dec 1947 news item in LAEx reported that Ronald Reagan was to star in the film, which at that time was to be directed by Raoul Walsh. Studio press material states that this was the first film to use director of photography Karl Freund's newly developed "Spectra" device, a color temperature meter which was designed to eliminate the guesswork from color ... More Less

According to a 15 Jul 1947 LAT news item, Thames Williamson was first assigned to write the screenplay for the film, and Vincent Sherman was to direct. A 2 Dec 1947 news item in LAEx reported that Ronald Reagan was to star in the film, which at that time was to be directed by Raoul Walsh. Studio press material states that this was the first film to use director of photography Karl Freund's newly developed "Spectra" device, a color temperature meter which was designed to eliminate the guesswork from color photography. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
7 Jan 1950.
---
Daily Variety
4 Jan 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Jan 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 48
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 48
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 50
p. 3, 6
Los Angeles Examiner
2 Dec 1947.
---
Los Angeles Times
15 Jul 1947.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
7 Jan 50
p. 145.
New York Times
4 Feb 50
p. 9.
Variety
15 Jul 1947.
---
Variety
4 Jan 50
p. 63.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"Reckon I'm in Love," music and lyrics by Mack David, Al Hoffman and Jerry Livingston
"Cielito lindo," traditional
"Old Dan Tucker," music and lyrics attributed to Daniel Decatur Emmett.
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 January 1950
Production Date:
late August--mid November 1948
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 January 1950
Copyright Number:
LP2928
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
76-77 or 79
Length(in feet):
6,867
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the Montana territory, in 1871, sheepherders invade land occupied by cattle ranchers. Morgan Lane, a sheepman whose father was driven off his land by cattlemen, returns to Montana, determined to graze sheep. After one of his herders is killed, Morgan accompanies Poppa Schultz, a traveling salesman, into town, and he presents himself as Poppa's partner. The opposition to the sheepmen is led by cattle ranchers Maria Singleton, whose father was killed in a sheep and cattle war, and her fiancé, Rod Ackroyd. Still pretending to be a salesman, Morgan asks the ranchers about their hostility to sheep. His questions raise the suspicions of cattle rancher Slim Reeves, who challenges him to a gunfight. Later, Tecumseh Burke, an old cowhand, privately reveals to Morgan that he knows his real identity. Later, Maria invites Morgan to dinner with Rod and George Forsythe, who owns the land adjoining Maria's ranch. During the evening, Morgan bets Rod a portion of his land that he can ride any horse on the property. Rod selects a horse that is reputed to be a killer and, to make sure that Morgan loses, cuts the stirrup. Even so, Morgan almost wins his bet. Later, Maria offers to lease some land to Morgan, whom she still believes is interested in running cattle, and makes it clear how strongly she is opposed to sheep. After Morgan's intention to bring sheep onto the land is revealed, however, Reeves severely beats and tries to kill Morgan. Tecumseh saves Morgan and later explains that Reeves's fury stems from the fact that the small cattlemen are being squeezed out of business by the ... +


In the Montana territory, in 1871, sheepherders invade land occupied by cattle ranchers. Morgan Lane, a sheepman whose father was driven off his land by cattlemen, returns to Montana, determined to graze sheep. After one of his herders is killed, Morgan accompanies Poppa Schultz, a traveling salesman, into town, and he presents himself as Poppa's partner. The opposition to the sheepmen is led by cattle ranchers Maria Singleton, whose father was killed in a sheep and cattle war, and her fiancé, Rod Ackroyd. Still pretending to be a salesman, Morgan asks the ranchers about their hostility to sheep. His questions raise the suspicions of cattle rancher Slim Reeves, who challenges him to a gunfight. Later, Tecumseh Burke, an old cowhand, privately reveals to Morgan that he knows his real identity. Later, Maria invites Morgan to dinner with Rod and George Forsythe, who owns the land adjoining Maria's ranch. During the evening, Morgan bets Rod a portion of his land that he can ride any horse on the property. Rod selects a horse that is reputed to be a killer and, to make sure that Morgan loses, cuts the stirrup. Even so, Morgan almost wins his bet. Later, Maria offers to lease some land to Morgan, whom she still believes is interested in running cattle, and makes it clear how strongly she is opposed to sheep. After Morgan's intention to bring sheep onto the land is revealed, however, Reeves severely beats and tries to kill Morgan. Tecumseh saves Morgan and later explains that Reeves's fury stems from the fact that the small cattlemen are being squeezed out of business by the large ranchers. Morgan meets with them and suggests that they run their cattle along with sheep. Later, he tries to bring Forsythe in on their side by pointing out that the price of beef is declining while the price of wool is high. Forsythe is interested, but does not want to go against his neighbors, so he invites Rod and Maria to meet with Morgan and the other ranchers to work out a solution. Rod declines, however, partly because he plans to take advantage of Maria's absence to meet another woman, who is also the sheriff's girl friend. Maria and Forsythe argue about the pros and cons of allowing sheep on the land, and most of the ranchers support Maria. When Forsythe announces that he will allow sheep on his ranch, Reeves kills him. In retaliation, Morgan kills Reeves and a range war starts. The sheriff, who witnessed Rod's rendezvous with his girl friend, unofficially warns Morgan that Rod and Maria are planning to stampede their cattle and drive the sheep away. After a shootout, the sheriff, Morgan and his associates stop the stampede, but Rod is trampled to death. Maria then takes a stand against the sheep and wounds Morgan while trying to stop them from entering the town. She instantly regrets it, however, and as she and Morgan embrace, concedes that sheep and cattle ranchers can live together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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