The Reformer and the Redhead (1950)

88 or 90 mins | Comedy-drama | 5 May 1950

Cinematographer:

Ray June

Editor:

George White

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, William Ferrari

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The onscreen credits incorrectly list actor Charles Evans as "Charles Evens." HR news items in Feb 1949 indicate that Lana Turner and Robert Taylor were originally set for the roles played by June Allyson and Dick Powell. Allyson and Powell were married in real life. This was the first of two films that they made together. The Reformer an the Redhead was the first picture directed and produced by Norman Panama and Melvin Frank, who had previously worked as a writing team for radio, theater and film. Modern sources note that the film was made at a final cost of $1,230,000. In her autobiography, Allyson stated that she had a childhood phobia of cats and was terrified of working with lions on the set. Allyson and Powell recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre adaptation of the story, which aired on 25 Jun 1951. ...

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The onscreen credits incorrectly list actor Charles Evans as "Charles Evens." HR news items in Feb 1949 indicate that Lana Turner and Robert Taylor were originally set for the roles played by June Allyson and Dick Powell. Allyson and Powell were married in real life. This was the first of two films that they made together. The Reformer an the Redhead was the first picture directed and produced by Norman Panama and Melvin Frank, who had previously worked as a writing team for radio, theater and film. Modern sources note that the film was made at a final cost of $1,230,000. In her autobiography, Allyson stated that she had a childhood phobia of cats and was terrified of working with lions on the set. Allyson and Powell recreated their roles for a Lux Radio Theatre adaptation of the story, which aired on 25 Jun 1951.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Mar 1950
---
Daily Variety
23 Sep 1949
p. 12
Daily Variety
26 Sep 1949
p. 10
Daily Variety
1 Nov 1949
p. 1
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1949
p. 5
Daily Variety
8 Mar 1950
p. 3, 10
Daily Variety
12 Apr 1950
p. 4
Film Daily
9 Mar 1950
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 1949
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1949
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1950
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Mar 1950
p. 222
New York Times
10 Apr 1950
p. 15
Variety
8 Mar 1950
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Howard Koch
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Props
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Irving Ries
Spec eff
Spec eff
Mont seq
MAKEUP
Hair styles des by
Makeup created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Reformer and the Redhead" by Robert Carson in The Saturday Evening Post (15 Jan 1949).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 May 1950
Production Date:
21 Sep--1 Nov 1949
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
7 March 1950
LP2943
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
88 or 90
Length(in feet):
8,075
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14286
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Commodore John Balwind Parker, the corrupt boss of the most influential political machine in the town of Oakport, California, has just returned from Africa, where he has been on a hunting safari with his niece, Lily Rayton Parker. John and Lily proudly display their animal trophies at the city zoo, much to the disappointment of Dr. Kevin G. Maguire, the zoo superintendent, who does not believe in hunting wild animals. Kevin is later fired from his job, which angers his quick-tempered daughter Kathleen, who works as a tour guide at the zoo. Kathy knows that her father was fired because he opposed the commodore's decision to place his mounted trophies on the walls of the zoo offices. She shows her displeasure at the Parkers' influence on the zoo commission by interrupting their trophy presentation and protesting their cruelty to animals. An argument ensues between Lily and Kathy, and ends in a fistfight. When Kathy is charged with assault and battery, disturbing the peace and suspicion of inciting a riot, she turns to her friend, reporter Tim Harveigh, for help. Tim suggests that she appeal her case to attorney Andrew Rockton Hale, who is running for mayor of Oakport as a reformer and as a "champion of the underdog." Tim and Kathy are unaware, however, that Andrew has been making empty campaign promises and plans to align himself with Parker's political machine to get an advantage in the race. After meeting with Parker and realizing that Parker intends to make him his puppet, however, Andrew decides to postpone the alliance until he can better negotiate the arrangement through blackmail. Kathy unwittingly gives Andrew information with ...

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Commodore John Balwind Parker, the corrupt boss of the most influential political machine in the town of Oakport, California, has just returned from Africa, where he has been on a hunting safari with his niece, Lily Rayton Parker. John and Lily proudly display their animal trophies at the city zoo, much to the disappointment of Dr. Kevin G. Maguire, the zoo superintendent, who does not believe in hunting wild animals. Kevin is later fired from his job, which angers his quick-tempered daughter Kathleen, who works as a tour guide at the zoo. Kathy knows that her father was fired because he opposed the commodore's decision to place his mounted trophies on the walls of the zoo offices. She shows her displeasure at the Parkers' influence on the zoo commission by interrupting their trophy presentation and protesting their cruelty to animals. An argument ensues between Lily and Kathy, and ends in a fistfight. When Kathy is charged with assault and battery, disturbing the peace and suspicion of inciting a riot, she turns to her friend, reporter Tim Harveigh, for help. Tim suggests that she appeal her case to attorney Andrew Rockton Hale, who is running for mayor of Oakport as a reformer and as a "champion of the underdog." Tim and Kathy are unaware, however, that Andrew has been making empty campaign promises and plans to align himself with Parker's political machine to get an advantage in the race. After meeting with Parker and realizing that Parker intends to make him his puppet, however, Andrew decides to postpone the alliance until he can better negotiate the arrangement through blackmail. Kathy unwittingly gives Andrew information with which to blackmail Parker when, while telling her hard luck story, she mentions Parker's corrupt influence on zoo officials. To prove her assertions, Kathy takes Andrew to her ranch to meet her father, who knows more about Parker's dealings. At the ranch, Andrew has his first encounter with the Maguires' unconventional pets, including their lion, Caeser, who gives him a fright. After growing accustomed to the lion's presence, Andrew eventually turns his attentions to Kathy and they spark a romance. Later, while Andrew visits the state capitol offices in Sacramento to investigate Parker's involvement in a questionable construction deal, Kathy, who has learned that Andrew was an orphan, enlists a group of children at the Oakport Orphanage to help with his campaign. When Andrew returns from Sacramento with evidence of Parker's corruption, he makes a secret deal with him to suppress the evidence in exchange for his unconditional support. Kathy and Andrew become engaged, but Kathy breaks off the engagement when Tim tells her about Andrew's secret deal with Parker. The break-up forces Andrew to realize his errors and, during a live radio show, he publicly reveals his deal with Parker. Andrew leaves the studio unaware that Herman, a dangerous lion, has escaped from the zoo and is roaming the streets of Oakport. While driving through town, Andrew sees the lion and, believing that it is Caesar, fearlessly prods him into his car. Kathy eventually finds Andrew, and he faints when she tells him that he has befriended a killer lion. Kathy revives Andrew and gives him a big kiss to show her admiration for his bravery in exposing Parker.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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