Sons of New Mexico (1950)

70 mins | Western | January 1950

Director:

John English

Writer:

Paul Gangelin

Producer:

Armand Schaefer

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Editor:

Henry Batista

Production Designer:

Harold MacArthur

Production Company:

Gene Autry Productions
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HISTORY

The film's working title was Sons of North Mexico ... More Less

The film's working title was Sons of North Mexico . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 Jan 1950.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jan 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Dec 49
pp. 137-38.
Variety
28 Dec 49
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"New Mexico Military Institute March," special lyrics by Paul Mertz, music by Capt. F. E. Hunt
"Can't Shake the Sands of Texas from My Shoes," words and music by Gene Autry and Diane Johnston
"There's a Rainbow on the Rio Colorado," words and music by Gene Autry and Fred Rose
+
SONGS
"New Mexico Military Institute March," special lyrics by Paul Mertz, music by Capt. F. E. Hunt
"Can't Shake the Sands of Texas from My Shoes," words and music by Gene Autry and Diane Johnston
"There's a Rainbow on the Rio Colorado," words and music by Gene Autry and Fred Rose
"Honey, I'm in Love with You," words and music by Curt Massey and Abbie Gibbon.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sons of North Mexico
Release Date:
January 1950
Production Date:
15 June--29 June 1949
Copyright Claimant:
Gene Autry Productions
Copyright Date:
5 January 1950
Copyright Number:
LP2838
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70
Length(in feet):
6,314
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As Gene Autry tows a horse trailer down a desert road with his truck, young Randy Pryor shoots at the truck with an air rifle. Gene pulls off the road to investigate, and a troop of students from the New Mexico Military Institute in nearby Roswell ride up on horseback. Goaded by his friend, Gig Jackson, Randy then shoots Chuck Brunton, the captain of the troop, and the cadets, accompanied by Gene, chase the boys. When they finally stop, Gene learns that Randy is the son of his old friend Jim, who recently died after appointing Gene his executor. When Gene arrives at the Pryor ranch, he meets Jim's niece, Eileen MacDonald, who was brought up there. She discloses that Randy has promised to carry nothing more than an air rifle until he is twenty-one, because he has a bad temper. That night, after dinner, Randy joins Gig at the Feeney ranch. After he leaves, Eileen reluctantly tells Gene her belief that Gig, who works at the ranch, has been a bad influence on Randy and has encouraged him to gamble with Pat Feeney. Gene decides to investigate, but when he steps outside, he sees a man leaving the barn in which Randy's prize race horse, Bluebell, is kept and chases him. The man introduces himself as Rufe Burns from the Feeney ranch. Meanwhile, Feeney goads Randy, who has already lost $600, into betting Bluebell in a race against Feeney's best horse, with both horses going to the race's winner. Randy loses the race and Bluebell, and Gene later discovers a piece of rock lodged in Bluebell's hoof. Although Gene ... +


As Gene Autry tows a horse trailer down a desert road with his truck, young Randy Pryor shoots at the truck with an air rifle. Gene pulls off the road to investigate, and a troop of students from the New Mexico Military Institute in nearby Roswell ride up on horseback. Goaded by his friend, Gig Jackson, Randy then shoots Chuck Brunton, the captain of the troop, and the cadets, accompanied by Gene, chase the boys. When they finally stop, Gene learns that Randy is the son of his old friend Jim, who recently died after appointing Gene his executor. When Gene arrives at the Pryor ranch, he meets Jim's niece, Eileen MacDonald, who was brought up there. She discloses that Randy has promised to carry nothing more than an air rifle until he is twenty-one, because he has a bad temper. That night, after dinner, Randy joins Gig at the Feeney ranch. After he leaves, Eileen reluctantly tells Gene her belief that Gig, who works at the ranch, has been a bad influence on Randy and has encouraged him to gamble with Pat Feeney. Gene decides to investigate, but when he steps outside, he sees a man leaving the barn in which Randy's prize race horse, Bluebell, is kept and chases him. The man introduces himself as Rufe Burns from the Feeney ranch. Meanwhile, Feeney goads Randy, who has already lost $600, into betting Bluebell in a race against Feeney's best horse, with both horses going to the race's winner. Randy loses the race and Bluebell, and Gene later discovers a piece of rock lodged in Bluebell's hoof. Although Gene suspects that Feeney is responsible, he cannot prove it. Unknown to Gene and Randy, Feeney wants revenge because, years earlier, Jim turned Feeney in for crooked gambling and then married his girl friend. To keep Randy out of further trouble, Gene decides to send him to the New Mexico Military Institute. Randy is prepared to hate the school but, in spite of himself, is impressed by the level of horsemanship that he sees there. Gene then fires Gig and offers to pay off Randy's debts. Feeney refuses to take the money and orders Gene off his ranch. Some time later, the entire Pryor ranch crew, including Gene and Eileen, goes to the military school to watch Randy play polo. During the game, Randy's bad temper causes him to be dismissed from the school. The next day, Gig tells Randy that Burns put the stone in Bluebell's shoe on Feeney's orders. Randy is so mad that he picks a fight with Gig and knocks him unconscious. Seeing the opportunity to get rid of both Gig and Randy, Feeney then kills Gig and blames the murder on Randy. Burns claims to be horrified by the cold-blooded murder and helps Randy escape. Feeney and his men then chase Randy, planning to kill him as well. Later, Gene and Eileen arrive at the Feeney ranch and discover Gig's body. They hear shots, and while Eileen rouses the cadets at the military school, Gene goes to Randy's aid. When Gene tells Randy that Gig was killed by a blow to the skull, Randy realizes that he was not the murderer. Still determined to get revenge, Feeney shoots Randy, but is overcome by Gene. When Randy recovers, he returns to the New Mexico Military Institute a changed man. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
with songs


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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