Southside 1-1000 (1950)

73 mins | Drama | 12 November 1950

Director:

Boris Ingster

Producers:

Maurice King, Frank King

Cinematographer:

Russell Harlan

Editor:

Christian Nyby

Production Designer:

Edward S. Haworth

Production Company:

King Bros. Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Counterfeit and National 1-1000 . Actor William Forrest's surname was misspelled as "Forest." According to a HR news item, the film's plot was taken from the files of the United States Secret Service. The film opens with stock footage of combat scenes and a voice-over commentary asserting that with the tension in Korea, the most powerful weapon of all is the American dollar, the integrity of which must be protected. A HR news item adds Danny Morton to the cast, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.
       Portions of the film were shot on location in San Raphael, California at San Quentin Penitentiary. Many scenes were shot on location in Los Angeles, at such sites as Union Station, Angel's Flight and Wrigley Field. A HR news item reports that the film was given a special preview at San Quentin in Oct 1950. According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Breen Office objected to the film's original ending, in which Nora committed suicide by throwing herself in front of the train, and to a tag line about Riggs sending violets for her funeral. The Production Code forbade using suicide as a way to kill off criminals in films, and the tag line was deemed unacceptable because it romanticized a criminal. Allied Artists ran afoul of the U.S. Treasury Department, according to a DV news item, when its publicity department hired a New York printer to produce counterfeit $10 bills for exhibitors to ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Counterfeit and National 1-1000 . Actor William Forrest's surname was misspelled as "Forest." According to a HR news item, the film's plot was taken from the files of the United States Secret Service. The film opens with stock footage of combat scenes and a voice-over commentary asserting that with the tension in Korea, the most powerful weapon of all is the American dollar, the integrity of which must be protected. A HR news item adds Danny Morton to the cast, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.
       Portions of the film were shot on location in San Raphael, California at San Quentin Penitentiary. Many scenes were shot on location in Los Angeles, at such sites as Union Station, Angel's Flight and Wrigley Field. A HR news item reports that the film was given a special preview at San Quentin in Oct 1950. According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Breen Office objected to the film's original ending, in which Nora committed suicide by throwing herself in front of the train, and to a tag line about Riggs sending violets for her funeral. The Production Code forbade using suicide as a way to kill off criminals in films, and the tag line was deemed unacceptable because it romanticized a criminal. Allied Artists ran afoul of the U.S. Treasury Department, according to a DV news item, when its publicity department hired a New York printer to produce counterfeit $10 bills for exhibitors to use in promoting the film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Oct 1950.
---
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1950.
---
Daily Variety
6 Oct 50
p. 3.
Daily Variety
9 May 1951.
---
Film Daily
10 Oct 50
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
14 Oct 50
p. 163.
Hollywood Citizen-News
29 Nov 1950.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 50
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 50
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 50
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jun 50
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 50
p. 21.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 50
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jun 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 50
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 50
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
29 Nov 1950.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Oct 50
p. 517.
New York Times
3 Nov 50
p. 31.
The Exhibitor
25 Oct 50
p. 2956.
Variety
11 Oct 50
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITERS
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus ed
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
Prod mgr
Dial coach
Chief set elec
Tech adv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Je t'aime," words and music by Fritz Rotter and Harold Stern.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
National One One Thousand
Counterfeit
Release Date:
12 November 1950
Production Date:
14 June--late June 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 November 1950
Copyright Number:
LP543
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73
Length(in feet):
6,529
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
14780
SYNOPSIS

Convicted counterfeiter Eugene Deane appears to be a model prisoner, but actually is still practicing his craft, concealing the plates he is engraving in a hollowed-out Bible. After assisting the visiting chaplain with church services, Deane hides some plates in the lining of the chaplain's bag. The chaplain is later called to the home of a sick woman, and while he is with her, the man of the house is joined by a gangster, who retrieves the plates from his bag. Counterfeit $10 bills soon begin to turn up at gambling establishments, drawing the attention of the Treasury Department's Secret Service branch in Washington, D.C. Agent John Riggs searches Deane's prison cell and discovers his tools, but Deane, who has just been told he has only a few months to live, refuses to cooperate. The Secret Service gets its first lead when a Los Angeles detective catches a pickpocket named Nimble Willie with counterfeit money. Willie points out the man he robbed to Riggs, who trails him to the cigar store where the counterfeit money is exchanged, and identifies the ring's courier as Bill Evans, a traveling salesman. After Evans is arrested with a suitcase full of counterfeit bills and released on bail, Riggs instructs him to call the exchange for his contact, Reggie, and arrange a meeting. When Evans shows up for his assignation, however, Reggie and his henchmen take him to the top of an office building and throw him out a window. Riggs breaks the news to Mrs. Evans and searches the dead man's room, where he finds the label of an exclusive Beverly Hills tailor in a suit ... +


Convicted counterfeiter Eugene Deane appears to be a model prisoner, but actually is still practicing his craft, concealing the plates he is engraving in a hollowed-out Bible. After assisting the visiting chaplain with church services, Deane hides some plates in the lining of the chaplain's bag. The chaplain is later called to the home of a sick woman, and while he is with her, the man of the house is joined by a gangster, who retrieves the plates from his bag. Counterfeit $10 bills soon begin to turn up at gambling establishments, drawing the attention of the Treasury Department's Secret Service branch in Washington, D.C. Agent John Riggs searches Deane's prison cell and discovers his tools, but Deane, who has just been told he has only a few months to live, refuses to cooperate. The Secret Service gets its first lead when a Los Angeles detective catches a pickpocket named Nimble Willie with counterfeit money. Willie points out the man he robbed to Riggs, who trails him to the cigar store where the counterfeit money is exchanged, and identifies the ring's courier as Bill Evans, a traveling salesman. After Evans is arrested with a suitcase full of counterfeit bills and released on bail, Riggs instructs him to call the exchange for his contact, Reggie, and arrange a meeting. When Evans shows up for his assignation, however, Reggie and his henchmen take him to the top of an office building and throw him out a window. Riggs breaks the news to Mrs. Evans and searches the dead man's room, where he finds the label of an exclusive Beverly Hills tailor in a suit jacket. After learning that the tailor had delivered several suits to Evans at a Los Angeles hotel, Riggs checks in under the name Nick Starnes and quickly establishes himself as a big spender. Riggs has two FBI agents inform hotel manager Nora Craig that one of her guests has passed a $50 bill traced to a recent armored car robbery in Boston. He then gives Nora an envelope to be stored in the hotel safe, and when she secretly opens the envelope, she finds a stack of bills whose series numbers match those on the FBI's list. Nora and Riggs become romantically involved, and he soon receives a call from Reggie, who meets with Riggs and agrees to sell him $500,000 in counterfeit bills for $100,000. Meanwhile, the gravely ill Deane is on a train to a federal hospital when he overpowers his guard and escapes. Back at the hotel, Reggie becomes suspicious when he intercepts a cryptic telegram from Riggs's supervisor, Hugh Pringle, and Riggs is held prisoner at the gang's hideout in an abandoned warehouse. Reg summons Nora, who turns out to be the head of the counterfeiting ring as well as Deane's daughter. After Deane dies, Riggs calls Pringle and arranges to pick up the money for his transaction with the counterfeiters at Union Station, but when they reach Angel's Flight, Reggie manages to escape the Secret Service agents who are tailing them. They return to the hideout, and Riggs sends one of Reggie's men to the corner deli for sandwiches, giving him a $10 bill on which he has written instructions to call the Secret Service immediately. Meanwhile, Nora finds a sketch in Deane's notebook identifying Riggs as a Secret Service agent, and she orders her men to abandon the warehouse. The deli owner calls the authorities, and the police arrive just as the counterfeiters are setting the warehouse on fire, with Riggs still inside. Nora tries to escape with the money, and Riggs pursues her to a river bridge. There Nora loses her balance and falls into the path of a speeding train. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.