Summer Stock (1950)

108-09 mins | Musical | August 1950

Director:

Charles Walters

Producer:

Joe Pasternak

Cinematographer:

Robert Planck

Editor:

Albert Akst

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Jack Martin Smith

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to HR , M-G-M optioned Sy Gomberg's original screenplay in Dec 1948, at which time Judy Garland and Gene Kelly were announced for the starring roles. Although June Allyson was announced for the leading female role in Feb 1949, Garland was later reinstated. The film was Garland's first picture since being placed on suspension by M-G-M on 10 May 1949. Garland's suspension came during the filming of Annie Get Your Gun (see above), from which she was fired and replaced by Betty Hutton. Following her suspension, Garland spent nearly three months at a Boston hospital, where she was treated for drug dependency.
       According to a May 1949 HR news item, Busby Berkeley, the first director assigned to the film, was replaced by Charles Walters before production began. Contemporary news items in DV indicate that Walter Plunkett replaced Helen Rose as the film's head costume designer, and that garments designed by Rose were discarded following her replacement. Rose was later placed in charge of designing Gloria De Haven's costumes. DV news items list actor Michael Chapin and models Ann Beck, Lola Kendreck, Dona Damron and Pat Dean Smith in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. HR production charts indicate that Joseph Ruttenberg worked as a co-cinematographer with Robert Planck in late Dec 1949 and early Jan 1950. A Mar 1950 DV news item notes that the "Get Happy" production number, which was to have been directed by dance director Nick Castle, was instead directed by Walters.
       Modern sources relate the following information about the ... More Less

According to HR , M-G-M optioned Sy Gomberg's original screenplay in Dec 1948, at which time Judy Garland and Gene Kelly were announced for the starring roles. Although June Allyson was announced for the leading female role in Feb 1949, Garland was later reinstated. The film was Garland's first picture since being placed on suspension by M-G-M on 10 May 1949. Garland's suspension came during the filming of Annie Get Your Gun (see above), from which she was fired and replaced by Betty Hutton. Following her suspension, Garland spent nearly three months at a Boston hospital, where she was treated for drug dependency.
       According to a May 1949 HR news item, Busby Berkeley, the first director assigned to the film, was replaced by Charles Walters before production began. Contemporary news items in DV indicate that Walter Plunkett replaced Helen Rose as the film's head costume designer, and that garments designed by Rose were discarded following her replacement. Rose was later placed in charge of designing Gloria De Haven's costumes. DV news items list actor Michael Chapin and models Ann Beck, Lola Kendreck, Dona Damron and Pat Dean Smith in the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. HR production charts indicate that Joseph Ruttenberg worked as a co-cinematographer with Robert Planck in late Dec 1949 and early Jan 1950. A Mar 1950 DV news item notes that the "Get Happy" production number, which was to have been directed by dance director Nick Castle, was instead directed by Walters.
       Modern sources relate the following information about the production: Producer Joe Pasternak initially wanted to cast Mickey Rooney opposite Garland, but because Rooney was no longer considered the box office draw that he had been in the past, Kelly was cast instead. Kelly and Walters disliked the script but agreed to do it only as a personal favor to Garland, whose career was near collapse. After three weeks of production, Pasternak, frustrated by Garland's frequent delays and erratic behavior, tried to abandon the picture. However, M-G-M production chief Louis B. Mayer refused to allow the picture to be halted and insisted that Pasternak give Garland another chance. The delays continued and additional problems were created by Garland's rapid gain in weight.
       The "Get Happy" number was one of the last items on the film's production schedule, and was shot nearly three months after Garland had filmed her other scenes. During those months, Garland was treated by a hypnotist for weight loss, and succeeded in losing several pounds. Another musical number, entitled "Heavenly Music," was to have featured Garland singing and dancing with Kelly and Phil Silvers, but because she failed to show up on the set, the number was filmed without her. (Garland does, however, appear in her costume for the "Heavenly Music" number in the scene following the "Get Happy" number). Kelly choreographed himself in the "You Wonderful You" musical number, as well as the numbers "All for You" and "Portland Fancy." Castle choreographed other routines, including the "Dig-Dig-Dig Dig for Your Dinner" number.
       Summer Stock was the last film Garland made for M-G-M, the studio to which she had been under contract for many years. Garland was fired by M-G-M in Sep 1950, while working on Royal Wedding in a part she had taken over from the then pregnant June Allyson. Jane Powell replaced Garland, who did not appear in another film until 1954, when she starred in A Star Is Born . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 Aug 1950.
---
Daily Variety
24 Oct 49
p. 8.
Daily Variety
31 Oct 49
p. 2.
Daily Variety
8 Nov 49
p. 1.
Daily Variety
9 Nov 49
p. 8.
Daily Variety
25 Nov 49
p. 11.
Daily Variety
16 Dec 49
p. 7.
Daily Variety
13 Mar 50
p. 6.
Daily Variety
15 Mar 50
p. 10.
Daily Variety
4 Aug 50
p. 3.
Film Daily
11 Aug 50
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Dec 48
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Feb 49
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 49
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Dec 49
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 50
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 50
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 50
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Aug 50
p. 434.
New York Times
1 Sep 50
p. 17.
Variety
9 Aug 50
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Stills
Gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gloria De Haven's cost by
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus dir
SOUND
Rec supv
DANCE
Dances staged by
Co-dir of square dance seq
MAKEUP
Hair styles des by
Makeup created by
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Grip
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Portland Fancy" by Saul Chaplin.
SONGS
"If You Feel Like Singing, Sing," "Happy Harvest," "Dig-Dig-Dig Dig for Your Dinner," "Friendly Star" and "Mem'ry Island," music by Harry Warren, lyrics by Mack Gordon
"All for You" and "Heavenly Music," music and lyrics by Saul Chaplin
"You Wonderful You," music by Harry Warren, lyrics by Saul Chaplin and Jack Brooks
+
SONGS
"If You Feel Like Singing, Sing," "Happy Harvest," "Dig-Dig-Dig Dig for Your Dinner," "Friendly Star" and "Mem'ry Island," music by Harry Warren, lyrics by Mack Gordon
"All for You" and "Heavenly Music," music and lyrics by Saul Chaplin
"You Wonderful You," music by Harry Warren, lyrics by Saul Chaplin and Jack Brooks
"Get Happy," music and lyrics by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1950
Production Date:
21 November 1949--early February 1950
mid March 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 August 1950
Copyright Number:
LP272
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
108-09
Length(in feet):
9,824
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14515
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Jane Falbury, a Connecticut farm owner, has worked hard to keep her family farm productive, but three years of bad crops have left her nearly destitute. Despite her financial crisis, Jane continues to pay for the expensive education of her sister Abigail, who is studying acting in New York. After her farm hands, Frank and Zeb, quit to take jobs in Hartford, Jane realizes that she must get an expensive tractor to help her with the heavy work on the farm. However, because she does not have enough money to pay for the new tractor, Jane tries to get a loan through her boyfriend, Orville Wingait, whose father, Japser G. Wingait, owns a general store in town and is a leader in the community. Jasper initially balks at Jane's extravagant request, but because he knows that his son is in love with Jane, he tells her that she can have the tractor if she consents to marry Orville. Jane refuses to accept Jasper's terms, but Jasper provides her with a new tractor regardless. Jane returns to her farm only to discover that it has been overrun by a troupe of actors that Abigail has brought in from New York to stage a musical in the farm's barn. Furious with Abigail for not asking her about the musical, Jane tells the troupe that they must leave. Joe D. Ross, who is Abigail's boyfriend and the director of the show, is also angry with Abigail for not having asked Jane's permission, but he uses his natural charm to persuade Jane to let them stay. Jane insists, however, that if the actors stay, they must perform some of the daily ... +


Jane Falbury, a Connecticut farm owner, has worked hard to keep her family farm productive, but three years of bad crops have left her nearly destitute. Despite her financial crisis, Jane continues to pay for the expensive education of her sister Abigail, who is studying acting in New York. After her farm hands, Frank and Zeb, quit to take jobs in Hartford, Jane realizes that she must get an expensive tractor to help her with the heavy work on the farm. However, because she does not have enough money to pay for the new tractor, Jane tries to get a loan through her boyfriend, Orville Wingait, whose father, Japser G. Wingait, owns a general store in town and is a leader in the community. Jasper initially balks at Jane's extravagant request, but because he knows that his son is in love with Jane, he tells her that she can have the tractor if she consents to marry Orville. Jane refuses to accept Jasper's terms, but Jasper provides her with a new tractor regardless. Jane returns to her farm only to discover that it has been overrun by a troupe of actors that Abigail has brought in from New York to stage a musical in the farm's barn. Furious with Abigail for not asking her about the musical, Jane tells the troupe that they must leave. Joe D. Ross, who is Abigail's boyfriend and the director of the show, is also angry with Abigail for not having asked Jane's permission, but he uses his natural charm to persuade Jane to let them stay. Jane insists, however, that if the actors stay, they must perform some of the daily chores on the farm. The troupe begrudgingly agrees to the arrangement, and Jane immediately gives them lessons on how to maintain a working farm. One day, while helping her housekeeper, Esme, in the kitchen, Jane improvises a little tap dance, unaware that Joe is watching her. She becomes embarrassed when she notices Joe, but Joe admires her dancing and tells her that she has real talent. As word begins to spread through town that an acting troupe from New York is staying at Jane's farm, Jasper becomes concerned about the sudden influx of show business people in the quiet community. Jane is summoned to town to explain the situation and address the protests of the town leaders. Meanwhile, Herb Blake, one of the actors, accidentally crashes Jane's new tractor. When Jane returns to the farm and learns about the accident, she orders the troupe to leave and demands that Abigail stay on the farm to help her. Jane later reverses her decision when the troupe pools all its money to buy her a new tractor. Joe continues to encourage Jane's interest in the theater, and Jane and Joe soon realize their attraction for each other. When Abigail and Harrison I. Keath, the show's leading man, suddenly leave the farm to star in a play in New York, Joe decides to take over the male lead and asks Jane to take her sister's part. Orville sternly objects to Jane's involvement with the troupe, and when Jasper learns that Jane is in the show, he threatens to use his influence to stop it. Jane responds by threatening to call off her engagement to Orville. Just before the first performance of the show, Abigail returns to the farm and demands that Jane relinquish her role. Jane refuses to give up the part, and when Abigail sees that Jane is in love with Joe, she decides to stop interfering with their romance. Joe proposes marriage to Jane just before the show begins and Jane gladly accepts. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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